Marcelo

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Oh..well...it's me again asking about Mistel combinations..sorry for being a pain..:)

In the book " Mistel - German Composite Aircraft and Operations 1942-1945", by R. Forsyth, published by Classic Publications, on page 194 ,
there is a comment about a mistel combination that involved a Fw 190 and a He 177 Greiff as lower component. Unfortunately, the book does not provide a drawing of this composite.

Could anybody post a 3-view drawing about the arrangement between these planes? ( If it is available, of course...)

Thanks for help!!

Marcelo.
 
From german magazine "Jet & Prop" #3 1993.
Though I seem that my posting was more appropriately in section beside Thorvic in Scale Modelling, Fan Art & Profiles.
 

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Hi,

here is the Heinkel He.177 Greif profile and variants.
 

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The Heinkel He.274 is very interesting. It had been completed by the Ateliers d'Aéronautique de Suresnes under the type name A.A.S. 1. It was used as launcher for some french prototypes at the end of the 40's.
 
Hi all,

a 3view of the "Junkers Ju.177" with Daimler-Benz D.B.613. (A version of the Heinkel He.177 "Greif".)
 

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I don't quite understand - this is the fuelage, wings and tail assembly of the He177 with a Junkers cockpit?
 
Yes lark:

"Heinkel He.177, 277, 274" by Manfred Griehl and Joachim Dressel (Airlife Publishing Ltd.).

Servus Maveric
 
Gondola aside, the nose glazing looks a bit like that of the Ju-277B-6/R3.
 
Just a guess, but could it be some kind of alternative design to
the Ju 488, maybe to make the own design look better ?
To me it doesn't make much sense for Junkers, with an own design
on the drawing board and trying to introduce a kind of "modular
construction", to give much effort to a Heinkel design.
 
[...]According to Dipl-Ing Günter, the best improvement in performance was promised by the installation of the heavier DB 613 coupled power plant med up of two DB 603 12-cylinder liquid-cooled engines. However, keeping the main existing main undercarriage units (but with bigger tyres) would require a thicker wing of deeper leading leading-edge section. Apart from the additional construction effort necessary, the new and heavier wing would alter the aerodynamics of the He 177. As a consequence, the increased all-up weight of the aircraft would necessitate strengthening of the fuselage, tailplane and tailwheal. Yet another drawback would be the marked loss of speed and a 5% reduction in operational speed caused by the fitment of 4 engine exhaust flame dampers. [...]

He 177 /”Ju”-177
Crew: 5
Powerplant: 2*DB 613
Output(each): 3,800hp
Wing Span: 31.50m (103 ft 8in)
Weight (loaded): 34.700 kg (76.500 lb)
Max Speed*: 425 km/h (264 mph)
Ceiling: 8.000m (26,247 ft)
Range: 4.600 km (2.858 miles)
Arment
Nose (lower): 1*FDL 131Z
Dorsal(fwd): 1* FDL 151Z
Dorsal(aft): -
Ventral: 1* WL 131Z
Tail: 1*HL 131V
Source: Page 96-98 from the book "Heinkel He.177, 277, 274" by Manfred Griehl and Joachim Dressel (Airlife Publishing Ltd.)
 
Could this be a case similar to that of the Me263/Ju248? Junkers had excess design capacity, so a Heinkel project was reassigned and given a free type number in the Junkers series?
 
DISCLAIMER: First off, lets clear something up....ABSOLUTELY NO POSTS ABOUT NAZI ATOM BOMBS!! Mods, if that crazy talk starts up again, feel free to lock up the thread.

That being said.......

Here's a little sumthin-sumthin on the He-177. It's an 8-page article, also suitable for either print or download

Courtesy of War Eagles Air Museum, out in my neck of the woods (more or less):
http://www.war-eagles-air-museum.com/newsletters/weam_newsletter_2011-1.pdf
 
Hi,


we can transfer this topic to Early Aircraft Projects section.
 
Topics merged, and from Griehl/Dressel "He 177-277-274" a 3-view
of an early design for the He 177B-5, featuring a nose wheel landing gear.
 

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Hi,


here is the Heinkel He.177 V.1 or P.1041 drawing.
 

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To prevent misunderstandings: It' the drawing of the windtunnel model (!) of the
He 177. the stick protruding from the tail isn't a part of the aircraft, but just the
attachement point and measurements are just for that model, too.
 
Hi, could someone please tell me the actual max bomb load of the He 277 (not He 177B)? Many thanks.
 
In "Heinkel 177-277-274" by Manfred Griehl and Joachim Dressel, the highest
bombload for the He 277 is given as 5,600 kg (for the version with a fuselage width
of 1,750 mm), resulting in a range of 8,600 km. For the maximum range of 11,100 km,
bombload was reduce to 3,000 kg.

(will merge this thread with the older one about He 177 versions and projects, to be found
here http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3183.msg218413.html#msg218413 )
 
But how? That makes absolutely no sense as the He 177's max payload was 7200 kg. Was the He 277's bomb bay smaller?:eek:

EDIT: After some quick calculations it turns out the He 177's bomb bay is 7,560mm long, 1750mm wide, and 900mm deep. This compares to 7,500mm long 1,500mm wide (don't have the depth) for the tailwheel version, and 1,750mm wide, and 7,000mm long (don't have the depth) tricycle version of the He 277. But why? The He 277 is slightly larger, and both don't hold a candle to the Me 264 who in comparison an entire 1 and 2 meters shorter to the He 177 and 277 respectively and can hold and absolute maximium of 2x SC2500 and 4 x SC1800 bombs which is 13200 kg or 29,000 lbs compared to the absolute maximum of the He 177 which is 4 x SC1700 which is 6800kg or 15200lbs.
 
The He 277 is said to have used the fuselage of the He 177 A-7. The
aim of its construction was range, not bomb load, AFAIK, so the weight
of the biggest possible bomb load may not be that relevant.
 
Jemiba said:
The He 277 is said to have used the fuselage of the He 177 A-7. The
aim of its construction was range, not bomb load, AFAIK, so the weight
of the biggest possible bomb load may not be that relevant.

Huh, really? It seems to me that the He 277 had a completely different fuselage:

0
 
SpicyJuan said:
... It seems to me that the He 277 had a completely different fuselage:

Initial production He 277B-5/R2s followed the pattern of the He 277 V3, using He 177A-5/R8 airframes (modified with twin tailplanes).

The unbuilt He 277B-6/R1 would have had extended wings but used the He 177A-6/R2 fuselage. The He 277B-6/R2 would have begun the major fuselage changes (having its width reduced, its bomb bay shortened, and the cockpit glazing shape revised). The He 277B-6/R3 had its cockpit section revised again, the forward fuselage deepened, and the overall fuselage length increased ... so, in effect, a completely new fuselage.

The last The He 277 built was the sole 'B-7 which employed a standard He 177A-7 fuselage.

This is all from an ancient source -- Wm Green's Bombers and Reconnaissance Aircraft Volume Nine of 1967 -- but the information is repeated in Kay & Smith's 2002 German Aircraft of the Second World War.
 
Ok, thank you very much. I found this weird tidbit as well:

mqvlGkO.png
 
Apophenia said:
SpicyJuan said:
... It seems to me that the He 277 had a completely different fuselage:

Initial production He 277B-5/R2s followed the pattern of the He 277 V3, using He 177A-5/R8 airframes (modified with twin tailplanes).

The unbuilt He 277B-6/R1 would have had extended wings but used the He 177A-6/R2 fuselage. The He 277B-6/R2 would have begun the major fuselage changes (having its width reduced, its bomb bay shortened, and the cockpit glazing shape revised). The He 277B-6/R3 had its cockpit section revised again, the forward fuselage deepened, and the overall fuselage length increased ... so, in effect, a completely new fuselage.

The last The He 277 built was the sole 'B-7 which employed a standard He 177A-7 fuselage.

This is all from an ancient source -- Wm Green's Bombers and Reconnaissance Aircraft Volume Nine of 1967 -- but the information is repeated in Kay & Smith's 2002 German Aircraft of the Second World War.

Upon further review, I believe that may be incorrect as the He 177B-5 was a four-engined A-5 and the He 177B-7 was a four-engined He 177A-7 (this is important because in old literature, the He 177B and He 277 are know as the same aircraft under different designations when in reality they were quite different).
 
Yes, I've seen online assertions that He 277B-5 as a 'cover designation' was an erroneous post-war assumption. Are you aware of any documentary evidence that backs this up?

For others, in Dec 1943, some 120 four-engined He 177B-5s ordered under Programm 225-1. This production order was then recinded by Programm 226-1 of July 1944.
German Aircraft Industry and Production, 1933-1945, F-A Vajda & P Darcy, Airlife Publishing, Ramsbury, Wilts, 1998
 
Apophenia said:
Yes, I've seen online assertions that He 277B-5 as a 'cover designation' was an erroneous post-war assumption. Are you aware of any documentary evidence that backs this up?

For others, in Dec 1943, some 120 four-engined He 177B-5s ordered under Programm 225-1. This production order was then recinded by Programm 226-1 of July 1944.
German Aircraft Industry and Production, 1933-1945, F-A Vajda & P Darcy, Airlife Publishing, Ramsbury, Wilts, 1998

Manfred Griehl's and Joachim Dressler's Heinkel: He 177,277,274 completely blows the cover-designation story, but alas it is infested with nasty typo's such as:

hgrAK6x.png


Which leave doubt and second-guessing everywhere. At this point, there seems to be so much confusion in other literature caused by the interchangeability between He 177B and typos in the book (a good example is wikipedia which seems to get a lot right but then confuses the specifications with the He 177B!), that it will take a lot to convince me if a particular point is actually referring to the He 277 and not the He 177B. Thankfully I'mm also getting the original German version (of Heinkel: He 177,277,274) to see exactly what's what.
 
SpicyJuan said:
... but alas it is infested with nasty typo's such as: ...

Maybe not the authors, but just the translation is to blame. The shown error doesn't
show up in the German edition:
 

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Jemiba said:
SpicyJuan said:
... but alas it is infested with nasty typo's such as: ...

Maybe not the authors, but just the translation is to blame. The shown error doesn't
show up in the German edition:

Oh great, well I'm excited! Also I'm even more confused by this:

2YQbdob.png


What? How does it have more compared to this?:

ztuI2WL.png
 
From
Airprofils Nº6 Artipresse
 

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