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Hawker HS.141 VTOL airliner, HS.140 VTOL business jet

mike.kent

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The Hs 140 and 141 were schemed in the 'Research & Future Projects Dept' at Hatfield headed by Derek Brown. The model with the ogival wing was the HS 133 I believe. I don't remember the twin fins but a powered wind tunnel model existed using small Dowty fans (about 3").

Charles Bradbury's HS 140 was schemed by David Kent. The wind tunnel model used the same 6" fan that was used in the HS 141 model (x16). David Kent later worked on Ian C-Miles' business jet ('Leopard' I think) post HS.

The large scale HS 141 wind tunnel model was developed by John Holmes-Walker who ran the powerplant group within the office. Major parts of the model were manufactured at HS Brough in the model shop. If you are interested, more later.
My Father is David Kent and searching through his old paperwork I have come across quite a bit of documentation regarding the HS140/141 project including drawings and a few photos. I am arranging to take the items to Brooklands Museum this month so they can reside in the Hawker Siddeley archive.
As far as my Dad's work is concerned he worked on several Light Aircraft designs and projects after leaving HS at Hatfield including the Optica for which he won a Design Council Award, the Nash Peterel and designed and built the CMC Leopard as mentioned above from a workshop in Dilton Marsh, Wiltshire. Mike Kent 02/09/2019
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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The Hs 140 and 141 were schemed in the 'Research & Future Projects Dept' at Hatfield headed by Derek Brown. The model with the ogival wing was the HS 133 I believe. I don't remember the twin fins but a powered wind tunnel model existed using small Dowty fans (about 3").

Charles Bradbury's HS 140 was schemed by David Kent. The wind tunnel model used the same 6" fan that was used in the HS 141 model (x16). David Kent later worked on Ian C-Miles' business jet ('Leopard' I think) post HS.

The large scale HS 141 wind tunnel model was developed by John Holmes-Walker who ran the powerplant group within the office. Major parts of the model were manufactured at HS Brough in the model shop. If you are interested, more later.
My Father is David Kent and searching through his old paperwork I have come across quite a bit of documentation regarding the HS140/141 project including drawings and a few photos. I am arranging to take the items to Brooklands Museum this month so they can reside in the Hawker Siddeley archive.
As far as my Dad's work is concerned he worked on several Light Aircraft designs and projects after leaving HS at Hatfield including the Optica for which he won a Design Council Award, the Nash Peterel and designed and built the CMC Leopard as mentioned above from a workshop in Dilton Marsh, Wiltshire. Mike Kent 02/09/2019
Cool. Might see that when I'm visiting Brooklands next.
 

blackkite

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Hi!
Explanation board says that,
HAWKER SIDDELEY 141
This is a wind tunnel model of the H.S.141 VTOL based on their Trident air liner, but employs banks of small fan jet engines to give it vertical lift off the ground & two large jet engines for forward propulsion. Project 1970.
 

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uk 75

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Grey Havoc Some years ago I had Aviation Retail Direct make me a 1/72 model of the BEA version. Love this artwork for an RAF Andover replacement for the 70s
 

Tony Hays

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I joined Future Projects at Hatfield in 1967, and worked for John Holmes-Walker on several tasks related to the HS.133/141. The first was to write a computer program to evaluate RB.202 (lift engine) thrust loss as a function of compressor bleed required for roll control. The mainframe was in London, and the interface was a teletype terminal at Hatfield. Programs were stored on punched paper tape. I was also tasked with designing and rig testing a variety of scaled RB.202 thrust deflectors that doubled as lower surface doors. The thrust deflectors would be used for transition from vertical to horizontal flight. I also did some aerodynamic analysis of the powered wind tunnel for Eddie Kemp. I left in 1969 to go to graduate school at MIT, and that unfortunately was the end of an enjoyable two years working for John and Eddie.
 
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