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McDonnell-Douglas F-15 Projects

Colonial-Marine

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Did Boeing ever consider resuming production of new "light airframe" F-15s for the air-superiority role? With a pair of F100-PW-229 or 232 engines that would have an amazing T/W ratio.
 

Pioneer

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Did Boeing ever consider resuming production of new "light airframe" F-15s for the air-superiority role? With a pair of F100-PW-229 or 232 engines that would have an amazing T/W ratio.
Sorry, I've missed something somewhere....whats this about "light airframe" your speaking of??

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overscan (PaulMM)

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F-15E was heavier, stressed for low altitude strike. All recently produced F-15s are F-15E based. I'm pretty sure Colonial-Marine is suggesting producing new F-15C airframes with modern engines. It's a non-starter because its been out of production since... forever.
 
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TomS

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F-15E was heavier, stressed for low altitude strike. All recently produced F-15s are F-15E based. I'm pretty sure Colonial-Marine is suggesting producing new F-15C airframes with modern engines. It's a non-starter because its been out of production since... forever.
Plus, one of the major airframe changes in the E was the common engine bay needed for those new engines. A new air superiority F-15 would end up being a weird hybrid airframe anyway. You'd need the E's aft fuselage for the engines and something like the SA's new wing for the restored outboard missile hardpoints (since a new air superiority F-15 would likely need to be able to serve as a missileer backing up stealthy planes like the F-22).
 

litzj

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TomS

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Possible F-15G could load lots of HARMs !
Just one in that picture (two assuming the other side is loaded symmetrically). The shoulder stations have Sparrow, not HARM. Being a foot longer and two inches wider than Sparrow, HARM is probably too big to mount on the shoulder stations.
 
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Mark Nankivil

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Possible F-15G could load lots of HARMs !
The chin pod played hell with the directional stability of the aircraft - a friend was heavily involved with the testing and commented on that. In the end, the F-4G carried on and the F-16C/D Block 30 and later CJ/DJ picked up where the F-4G left off.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

Grey Havoc

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SHiELD is comprised of three elements: the laser itself, which is being developed by Lockheed Martin; the beam control system made by Northrop Grumman; and the pod that encases the weapons system, from Boeing. Heggemeier said the pod is under construction, with integration of the laser and beam control system planned to start next year.

“A lot of the challenge is trying to get all of this stuff into this small pod. If you look at other lasers that are fairly mature, we have other laser systems that some other contractors have built that are ready to be deployed. But these are ground-based systems, and they are much, much more mature,” he said.

In April 2019, the Air Force Research Lab conducted a ground test with a surrogate laser system — the Demonstrator Laser Weapon System, or DLWS, now in use by the Army. The demonstration involved the successful downing of several air-to-air missiles.

“It turns out the DLWS system, when you take everything into account, is a really good surrogate for the laser power on SHiELD,” Heggemeier said.

Because both SHiELD and DLWS generate similar amounts of energy on target — in SHiELD’s case, Heggemeier would only say that it amounts to “tens of kilowatts” — the surrogate test gave the lab a good idea how the laser physically affects a target.

In 2019, the team conducted a flight test of a pod with the same outer mold line as the one under development by Boeing. The pod was mounted to an aircraft — Heggemeier declined to specify the model — and flown around Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, to help measure how vibrations, the force of gravity and other environmental factors might influence the performance of the weapon.

Air Force Magazine reported in 2019 that aerial demonstrations of SHiELD would occur onboard an F-15 fighter jet.
 

Mark Nankivil

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SHiELD is comprised of three elements: the laser itself, which is being developed by Lockheed Martin; the beam control system made by Northrop Grumman; and the pod that encases the weapons system, from Boeing. Heggemeier said the pod is under construction, with integration of the laser and beam control system planned to start next year.

“A lot of the challenge is trying to get all of this stuff into this small pod. If you look at other lasers that are fairly mature, we have other laser systems that some other contractors have built that are ready to be deployed. But these are ground-based systems, and they are much, much more mature,” he said.

In April 2019, the Air Force Research Lab conducted a ground test with a surrogate laser system — the Demonstrator Laser Weapon System, or DLWS, now in use by the Army. The demonstration involved the successful downing of several air-to-air missiles.

“It turns out the DLWS system, when you take everything into account, is a really good surrogate for the laser power on SHiELD,” Heggemeier said.

Because both SHiELD and DLWS generate similar amounts of energy on target — in SHiELD’s case, Heggemeier would only say that it amounts to “tens of kilowatts” — the surrogate test gave the lab a good idea how the laser physically affects a target.

In 2019, the team conducted a flight test of a pod with the same outer mold line as the one under development by Boeing. The pod was mounted to an aircraft — Heggemeier declined to specify the model — and flown around Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, to help measure how vibrations, the force of gravity and other environmental factors might influence the performance of the weapon.

Air Force Magazine reported in 2019 that aerial demonstrations of SHiELD would occur onboard an F-15 fighter jet.
Footage from inside cockpit of Qatar Emiri Air Forces F-15QA during first flight.

Here's a couple of pics of QA#2 (17-0002) I took last week as it was shooting approaches at Lambert Field.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

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