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Little-Known French Projects and Prototypes

hesham

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From TU 147 & 170;

Mr. Gratien Beyt, from Toulouse, did his pilot training towards the end of the first world conflict on the training
tracks around your city of Pau, using Nieuport devices.Subsequently, he built two airplanes: The first was equipped
with a Harley-Davidson engine. Drouillet, pilot of the squadron club at Francazal, will just try it on the ground.
The second was a parasol monoplane parasol, fitted with a 14-horsepower, 4-cylinder Ford engine. This automobile
engine had a major drawback, a mass of 75 kg. The landing gear was made up of motorcycle wheels. This machine
carried out its first tests in 1932 at Francazal.
 

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Apophenia

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There's a lot of confusion out there about the homebuild designer Mourlot. Some say Mourlot hid behind the pseudonym 'Max Williams'. There was a Max Williams-Mourlot whose firm - Mourlot et Cie of Billancourt/Seine - manufactured the Max cyclecar between 1927 and 1929. Did M Mourlot take his pseudonym from there? Or was this aircraft designer the selfsame Max Williams-Mourlot?

Max Williams-Mourlot was also an author of technical books for homebuilders (mainly of cyclecars, etc). The article also mentions a Hervé Lauwick. Since Hervé Lauwick was the name of a well-known humorist author of the day, I'd make a guess that another pseudonym is involved here and that this article's collaborateur, 'Hervé Lauwick', is none other than Mourlot (or Williams-Mourlot) himself.
 

Aubi

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Hervé Lauwick is mostly known as humorist, but he also was aviation enthusiast - French wiki mentions he owned a Santos-Dumont Demoiselle, and also he wrote a book called Heroines of the Sky: Women in Aviation.
The article mentions Hervé only as fervent supporter of popular aviation (and also as 'old flyer') who wrote many articles about the subject, and then the article transitions into description of Mourlot's F.M.60 aircraft as an example.
In short - not a pseudonym.
 

hesham

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Thank you my dears Apophenia and Aubi,and I will open a new topic for Max Williams aircraft,

Here is a light monoplane of 1929,created by B.F.B.,TU 170;

Contrary to what was written previously in this section,it was not in 1932, but in 1929 that the presentation of
the BFB device has the Aeronautical Competition Section at Lépine. The aircraft, equipped with the Anzani 35
hp, took off in 450 m at 70 km / h. At the 1929 exhibition, it was equipped with a 6 cylinder Anzani of 50 hp.

In 1932, the creation of the Société des Avions BFB was announced. intended for the construction and sale of
aircraft for tourism. Headquarters social was located 23 rue de Solférino and the managers were René Poisson
and ... Gaston Botali.

However, the relationship between the BFB aircraft of 1929 and the BFB company of 1932 remains to be
demonstrated.
 

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hesham

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From TU 161,

here is a monoplane designed by Mr. Emile Bogaert,many called EB-1;

in 1938, Emile Bogaert flew a small parasol monoplane equipped with a 20 hp Aubier-Dunne engine at Moisselles. The wing was carried by a tube cabin in the middle of which the pilot settled in a circular opening of the fuselage. Above his head, a transparent mobile panel allowed to restore the continuity of the upper surface of the wing, once the pilot installed.
 

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hesham

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From TU 161,

Mr. Charles Boishard designed a motorcycle powered ultra light monoplane in 1923;

in 1923, Mr. Boishardy built a small motorcycle-aviette for the Grand Prix du Petit Parisien which took place
on July 15, 1923.The device was built at Salmson's house under the direction of M. Béchereau. Put under
investigation on June 25, it made its first flight on the 13 July, two days before the Grand Prix. Under these
conditions, the designers used the most classic solutions from wooden monoplane, almost rectangular wing,
single piece, stiffened by oblique and guyed masts. The wing was thin, built around box and rib rails in spruce.

The wing and tail profiles, very hollow and very thin,recalled those of 1912.The quadrangular fuselage was built
around beams,uprights and crosspieces in spruce.The landing gear consisted of four uprights and two wheels
Hutchinson 500 x 45 with bungee cords.

The cell weighed 39 kg. This car was equipped with a Salmson engine 3 Ad of 12 ch & 1400 rpm.Too freshly
finished for the Grand Prix Moto-Avielle, he did not succeed in his qualifying climb and can be qualified.
He made only 2 or 3 flights, a climb of which 200 m. However, later, he succeeded quite a number of
flights, in particular a trip from Paris & Rochefort and back.
 

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Apophenia

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The event in question was the 15 July 1923 Grand-Prix de moto-aviette de Buc - Le Petit Parisien newspaper posted the prize (125,000 F). According to L'Express du Midi of 16 Juillet 1923, Boishardy (not Boishard) was thwarted in reaching the minimum height due to mist, limited time preventing him from making another attempt.

I'm not sure how 'Moto-Avielle' (sic) got past the Trait d'union editors (although it is a common OCR error). Span for the Boishardy Aviette (as AviaFrance styles it) was 8.00 metres, wing area 14.00 m², and length 6.10 m. https://www.aviafrance.com/boishardy-aviette--aviation-france-10297.htm

A small photo of the Boishardy moto-aviette being prepared for the Grand-Prix was published on the front page of Le Petit Parisien, 14 jullet 1923. Unfortunately, the little monoplane is mostly obscured by participants standing in front of the machine.

https://www.retronews.fr/journal/le-petit-parisien/14-juillet-1923/2/53932/1

BTW: In this instance, 'chez' mean 'at' not 'house'. So, this moto-aviette was constructed at the Salmson factory. Charles Boishardy seems to have been a pilot for Salmson. Ing. Louis Béchereau was, of course, a Salmson designer (while, at the same time, part of the Société des Avions Bernard).

Question: Can anyone confirm that this pilot was the prewar industrial designer Charles Eugène Alexandre Boishardy? If so, Sgt. Boishardy flew with SPA 315 late in WWI.
 

avion ancien

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I fear that the problems which you identify, Apophenia, result from using google translate - or similar automated systems - to translate from the original French text, rather than the translation being undertaken by someone who can read French and translate it into English. However I do not say this by way of criticism. If hesham intends to post all that Charles Claveau has written for TU, concerning the large number of little known, largely homebuilt, French light aircraft of the past decades, the task of translating his text into English will be enormous.
 

hesham

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From TU 161 & 224,

Mr. Raymond Boisson designed a biplane glider in 1922,there was also airplane of 1936,and the author
didn't know if he was the same guy or not;

Founding member of the V.S.M. de Montguyon in 1933, Raymond Boisson built a ramiant biplane aviette which he registered at the Congres de Combegrasse in 1922. Bearing the number 50 and the name Tourel-Boisson, this machine
was not, however, presented at the event of Camp Mouillard. The editor doesn't know who Mr. Tourel is,probably
someone who participated in the construction of the device.

The aircraft was to land on the fuselage. It had a wingspan of 5.75 m, a length of 5.50 m, an area of 16 m2 and an
empty weight of 25 kg.

The author does not know if this machine has stolen.
 

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Apophenia

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I think two different people have been conflated here. The Raymond Boisson of Montguyon was an amateur aviator, banker, and businessman (behind the clay and mineral-processing plant Société Boisson et Bourgoin of 1912 which became the Société de Raymond Boisson in 1926).

Tourel Boisson is a family name (which ClaudeL also shows as hyphenated). M Tourel Boisson's Nr. 50 was a flapping wing aircraft - if avion ancien can confirm the translating of "l’appareil h ailes battantes de M Tourel Boisson". [1]

So, was it Raymond Boisson of Montguyon who built the 1936 biplane? o_O

---------------

[1] La Libre Parole, Paris, 18 août 1922, front page
 

hesham

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From TU 169,

Mr. Jacques Boitard designed a parasol wing monoplane Project in 1929,but no more Info
was known.
 

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hesham

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From TU 161,

there was a light aircraft,built by amateur,and called Bonnefont-Peduplan,who has a more
Info about it ?.
 

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hesham

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From TU 162,

Mr. Botty designed an experimental airplane in 1920,no more details are known.
 

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Apophenia

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Mr. Botty designed an experimental airplane in 1920,no more details are known.
From NACA's Bibliography of Aeronautics 1909-1916, Paul Brockett, NACA, Washington, DC, 1921

The Botty Monoplane.
Aero, No. 35, Vol. 2 (Jan. 18, 1910), London, p. 49.
So, at least we know that M Botty created an experimental monoplane of some sort.
 

hesham

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Thank you my dear Apophenia,and from TU magazine;

here is all activities of Mr. Bouffort,and his association with de Rouge.
 

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hesham

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From TU 162,

here is an airplane,created by Mr. Marcel Bouvet;

In 1937, Marcel Bouvet had built a Pou du Ciel HM 14 in Saint-Arnoult in Yvelines, but did not make any
flight with this device. In 1938, he Contact Charles de Rougé to transform it into élytroplan. It accepts
and the transformation begins. only some rolling will be carried out before the war. After the conflict,
the aircraft is changed again and there appear to be some flights was made in 1947. It was quickly
abandoned.
 

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Apophenia

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...In 1938, he Contact Charles de Rougé to transform it into élytroplan...
And that was how the vicompte Charles de Rougé first used élytroplan. Later, it ended up being applied to any of de Rougé's experiments - like the central-masted Élytroplan Sigma. Fortunately, the article is explicit about Bouvet's Pou de Ciel modifications.

Something like: "The rear fixed wing of the Pou is deleted; the tail is considerably enlarged with a triangular fixed fin; the formerly-movable wing is fixed in place with a solid, triangular metal frame. The front part of this frame will be a support for a 1.50 m tubular dural mast which itself receives the well-known vertical stabilizer. The rest of the aircraft structure and its original engine are preserved."

... After the conflict, the aircraft is changed again and there appear to be some flights was made in 1947...
Not at all sure about that. Although the text isn't explicit, I assume that the comment about François Vallier 'at the controls' is not meant literally. The text actually says "Mais aucun vol n'est tenté tout de même..." which I read as meaning that no flights were made.
 

hesham

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Thank you my dears Apophenia and Grey,

from TU 224,here is an ultra-light airplane of 1930s,by Bouvier-Gaveau ;

M.Gaveau, gliding pilot,built in the thirties a single-seat airplane on the plans of Henri Bouvier. It was planned with a
20 hp Vaslin 4-cylinder engine. The editor doesn't know if construction was actually finished.
 

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hesham

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From TU 162,

here is an airplane designed by Mr. Marcel Brau;

Marcel Brau, of Hussein-Dey in the Algiers region, built a original aircraft, named BBG 2, which made its first
flight on 26 September 1938 in the hands of Jacques Duchêne Marullaz. The editor of this section does not
have any other information on this manufacturer nor its achievements.
 

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hesham

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From TU 171,175 & 186,

here is a small Info about Brylinski-Wehrle and his gliders,JJ-1,JJ-2 & JJ-3.
 

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Apophenia

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Research on all things Brylinski-Wehrlé springs from Norbert Mosson (although he uses Wehrlé-Brylinski for the type JJ2). Mosson helped recover the finished but disassembled JJ2 components from Louis Soeur's barn and is working to make the airframe flightworthy - the JJ2 never having been flown back in 1939. The type JJ2 was designed as an intermediate training and aerobatics glider for the Aéroclub d'Héricourt. Jean Wherlé was the club president, Jacques Brylinski a gliding instructor (the 'JJ' designations standing for 'Jean et Jacques').

(BTW: Jacques Brylinski is also credited with a 1934 Pétrel design. AFAIK, however, 'Pétrel' was simply the name applied to a club-built AVIA XIA glider.)

The JJ2 had been designed for Louis Soeur who had consulted Brylinski about the possible building a lightweight Minéo M5 for use as a training glider. Brylinski sketched out a new glider design over the plans for an M5. However, in the end, "le JJ2 de Soeur" retained only the wing attachment principles of the Minéo design. Mosson explains that damage to the JJ1 prototype at Banne prompted a rebuild which distracted attention from completing the JJ2.

The rebuild of the JJ1 resulted in the JJ3 prototype. It was planned to begin mass production of both the JJ2 - as a training glider - and JJ3 - as a high-performance sailplane - at a factory near Montbéliard. However, on 31 July 1939, the JJ3 crashed killing Jean Wherlé. The outbreak of WW2 ended plans for production but the essentially completed JJ2 and damaged JJ3 airframes both survived the war.

To the gull-winged JJ-3M derivative mentioned by TU can be added the unbuilt JJ-31. In 1945,
Jacques Brylinski recovered the damaged wing from his JJ3. (It was rumoured that a British pilot had recovered the remainder of the JJ3 at the end of WW2 but there has been no further sign of it). Brylinski's plan was to strip the damaged JJ3 components and use them in a new JJ-31 ('JJ31'?) design. This plan was never realized and there seems to be no other record of the unbuilt JJ-31 glider ... unless the JJ-3M and JJ-31 are one and the same?

WEHRLE-BRYLINSKI TYPE JJ2 n°01

A number of JJ2 and JJ3 photographs and drawings/plans can be viewed on the Retroplane site:
 

hesham

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Many thanks to you my dear Apophenia,

the C.A.F. ( Compagnie Aérienne Française) designed a twin engined long-range postal airplane Project,
powered by two 220 hp engines,in 1931.

TU 186
 

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hesham

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From TU 224,

Mr. Casteix designed a ultra-light or Avionnette airplane;

M.Coucilles, delegate of the RAA at Boulogne-sur-Gesse (31), mentions in an issue of "Envol" in the middle
construction in its thirties region, from a light aircraft by Mr. Casteix.No further details.
 

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hesham

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From TU 1983,

Mr. Chartoire designed a Dupuy D50 derivative,called a "Sport",

A pilot at Air France, Chartoire was friends with the engineer Dupuy. He attempted a flight to Saigon on the
plane D40 of the latter, but he failed and was injured in the accident which ended this attempt. Influenced by
Dupuy, he designed and built a derivative of the Dupuy D50 which he called "Sport".

The device is a monoplane with low wing, very elegant line. The very fine wing is equipped with flaps
soffit. It is trapezoidal in shape and will be called "the smallest wing in the world" of made of its surface
of 6.10 m °. The fuselage carries in front a Salmson 9 Aers engine of 75 hp in star reduction and compressor.
Pilot and passenger are placed in tandem behind the wing under a long windscreen in the interior. There is
dual control, main pilot in the back. The propeller is a Merville double blade with fixed wooden step.
The construction is entirely of wood. The classic fixed undercarriage is fitted with two well-faired wheels
with Messier shock absorbers. Takeoff is carried out in 220 m. The maximum speed will reach 294.540 km / h
and the practical ceiling 7700 m. All remarkable performances.

The first flights were made at the beginning of 1937 and on June 6 of that same year, Chartoire, accompanied
by Pierre Perney, broke the world speed record over 2000 km for a two-seater 4-liter Displacement at an average
of 180 km / h on the Marignane-Arles circuit. The future fate of the machine is unknown.
 

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Apophenia

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M. Chartoire was Etienne Chartoire. Interesting that his 'Sport' was based on the Dupuy D50 ... there's a hard aircraft to find details about!

BTW: That 'Sport' name may not have originated with Etienne Chartoire. "Monoplace de Sport" was commonly applied to the Dupuy D40. So, no reason that the D50 wouldn't have been dubbed a 'Biplace de Sport'.

I find it odd that there isn't more info available about Roger Dupuy himself. According to one online source, Dupuy was (amongst others) associated with Latécoère, Air Orient, Air Afrique (as chief pilot according to Henry Dupuy), Forces Françaises Libres, and Air France. One entry claims that he won the 1939 Prix du Pilote de Ligne medal and was an officer of the Légion d'Honneur (although 'Roger Dupuy' is a fairly common name).

Anyway, I wish we knew more about these guys ...
 

hesham

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Thank you my dear Apophenia,also there was Dupuy D60.

Mr. Chevade designed an airplane in 1934,


Mechanic at the Air France overhaul workshop in Damascus, Chevade and four of his work mates designed and
built a remarkable amateur device. During the conflict, Chevade will be the ankle worker in the L.A.M. (Military
Air Lines) from Damascus which provided transport aerial photography of Free France. Begun in September
1934, the aircraft flew on November 1, 1935. Because of his five "fathers", he will be named S.B.P.C.C. DS1
"Papillon". LR-AA registered? ? then SYRIA it will be used as a liaison aircraft during the conflict in the Levant.

The aircraft is a high-wing monoplane equipped with a 40 hp Salmson 9 Ad engine from a Klemm
rugged. The fuselage is made of molybdenum steel tubes, welded and crossed by piano strings with
floor forming box. The front part is made of 0.6 mm duralumin and the rear part is clothed.
The wing is carried by a cabin in profiled and welded steel tubes and by nets in duralumin tubes
profiled and covered. The wing is made of wood, consisting of a monolonger forming a box with scythe
spar to support the fins. The empennage is also made of wood. All the recovery is in
canvas. The undercarriage is made of duralumin tubes triangulated by recoil legs. Everything is streamlined and
Canvas. Bungee cords provide cushioning for the lander and crutch. The tanks are made of sheet metal
of welded aluminum and the controls in steel cables with torsion bar mounted on bearings
balls. The aircraft is two-seater in tandem under the open sky.
 

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hesham

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From TU 183,,

Mr. Louis Clement built a single seat racer monoplane in 1919 and a single seat ultra-light triplane
in 1921,but he had also a design for seaplane triplane of 1919.
 

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hesham

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From TU 183 & 186,

Mr. de Croismare designed and built a motor-glider aircraft in 1935.
 

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hesham

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