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Dassault Rafale NEWS ONLY

TomcatViP

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Official Croatian gov. statement:

« The offer of the French Republic envisages the delivery of 12 twin-engine aircraft (ten single-seater and two two-seater) Rafale in the F3-R standard, with a remaining resource of about 3800 hours of 7000 hours and with a potential extension of service life up to 9000 hours »


So that means that ~35% to ~45% of the aircrafts’ service life has been used up and the 12 used Rafales are roughly equivalent to 6.5 to 7.7 new build Rafales.
Those are thr nbr of the most used airframe as projected in 2024. This is different from a service life that have been used.

Issu du parc de l’Armée de l’Air et de l’Espace, un premier lot de 6 appareils sera livré en 2024 et le second en 2025. Dassault Aviation garantissant un potentiel de 9000 heures par appareil. Le plus âgé fêtera ses 10 ans en 2024.
-------((((

Sourced from the Air Force fleet, a first batch of 6 aircraft will be delivered in 2024 and the second in 2025. Dassault Aviation guarantees a potential of 9,000 hours per aircraft. The oldest will turn 10 in 2024.
Here

Notice also the guarantee on the airframe potential.

Last but not least, it won't be long before someone realizes that by selling weapons that are already in service just to allegedly replace them with a latter buy, France will invariably fail to reach its NATO commitment to 2% of GDP as seen through a rational analysis...
 
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H_K

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@TomcatViP An official statement should carry more weight than a news source. The statement is also quite clear.

If you reread the Air & Cosmos article, you’ll see that it doesn’t actually claim that the aircraft have 9,000 hours *remaining*, only that they have a *potentiel service life* of 9,000 hours. It says nothing of how many of those hours have actually been used.

One might quibble that some aircraft won’t have used up all 3,200 hours implied by the official statement... that said if we’re talking 10 year old airframes it won’t be hard for the FAF to pick only aircraft in the high 2,000s - low 3,000s hours.
 
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TomcatViP

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Seems F-4-1 datalink was test flown in a 8 ship dissimilar formation:

View: https://youtu.be/URvGCfc-DJ4


@H_K : you have already been proved wrong in the way you are over estimating the nbr of hours flown and minoring the cost of new airframe. That's 2 singular errors too far overlapping in a certain vision that those used airframe were well sold. I don't want to be dragged further along in that nonsense.
Thank you.
 
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H_K

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Here is a recap of official statements from verifiable sources... trying to limit my posts to the factual since I get flamed every time.

1) Croatian government statement that the Rafales will have 3,800 of 7,000 hours remaining, I.e will have flown 3,200 hours

2) Dassault official website dated early 2018 that Rafale fleet leaders had already flown >3,300 hours

3) French Senat report that Rafale unit production costs as of 2015 were €68 (Rafale C) and €73M (Rafale B)

4) 15 years of French Senat reports tracking Rafale costs that indicate an annual inflation of~2% from 2000 through 2015
 

helmutkohl

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2.jpg.db97051d736f6f6a55dc15f7cd42966a.jpg

 

Deltafan

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There is some articles in France after the article of Le Matin. It's again the discussion at the Swiss National Council ("3700 km"), the speech of Parly in Swiss in March ("Black boxes"), the "SkyView" contract with Thales two weeks later and the threats of popular initiative launched by the left in the event of an American choice. Some articles add cooperation around Swiss trainer PC-21, the Industrial offers from European manufacturers which would be more interesting, the potential duration of production chains (with now no more gap for the Rafale until at least 2030) or the postponement of the order for 12 new Rafale intended to replace second-hand ones sold to Croatia, to favor export deliveries...

But this is just speculation. Better to wait for the official announcement (maybe June 23, if we are to believe Le Matin). For the Rafale, if there have already been announcements of this kind which have been confirmed in the past (such as Greece or Croatia, but with more concrets sources), others have proved to be inaccurate (such as Morocco or Brazil).
 
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Flyaway

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More of the same:
Interesting quote from that article.
Speaking to The War Zone on condition of anonymity, a former Croatian Air Force MiG-21 pilot explained that he saw the Rafale as “absolute unnecessary overkill” for the country, adding that, even today, only around 30 percent of the MiG’s capabilities are actually being utilized — primarily, QRA scrambles and training for these same missions.

Describing the Rafale decision as politically motivated, he said he was concerned that no serious cost/benefit calculation had been provided for the full planned service life of the new jets and he also pointed out that the existing infrastructure at Zagreb-Pleso Air Base will require significant renovation, including modern hangars.
 

helmutkohl

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^ yep I agree. for a small country like Croatia, something like the FA-50 or M-346 should be sufficient for QRA and training
 

Archibald

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^ yep I agree. for a small country like Croatia, something like the FA-50 or M-346 should be sufficient for QRA and training

Resources - wise : you are certainly right. BUT - counterpoints: a) Balkans, one of the world most troubled zones beside Korea, MiddleEast... and b) Serbia as a client of Russia and btw, it's Vlad Putin, so better to watch your back. Also, since 2001 or 2011 or COVID, considering the way events go in this angry and dangerous century, you'd better get a handful of Rafales at least to protect your airspace.

Only peaceful and remote New Zealand can still afford not having fast jets for air defense (until the PRC navy starts playing havoc that far from home - you'll never known, they have started pissing off nearby Australia...)
 

TomcatViP

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The only overkill I see is the twin engine layout. Money spent for nothing IMOHO. But then it would have been hard to get a better deal given that France was so eager to sign a new contract.

There is, however the concerns that come with a major NATO partner claiming it reaches the 2% threshold in defense spendings while divesting that effort in foreign sales...
 
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Archibald

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Shame the Mirage 2000 has been dead and buried for 15 years but really - Dassault isn't Lockmart, not big enough to afford a smooth transition between one steamroller (the F-16 4500 airframes) and the next steamroller (F-35, 3000 airframes + planned those days). Had the Rafale sold earlier and better, just like the Mirage 50 and F1 in the 2000 early days (before 1990) the 2000-9 might have been allowed to survive longer and still evolve.
 

Deltafan

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Maybe another step for Rafale toward Indonesia:


To be confirmed, or not, in December...

Good news, the Ministry of Defense and Dassault have signed the initial 36 Rafale contracts

June 10, 2021

Good news from the planned purchase of defense equipment by the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia (Kemhan RI).
An Airspace Review source in Jakarta said the Indonesian Ministry of Defense and Dassault Aviation (the manufacturer of the Rafale ) from France had signed an initial contract for the procurement of 36 multi-role fighter jets.

The signing of the initial contract called the “Come Into Force” contract was signed on Monday, June 7, 2021 and will take effect in December 2021.
“The 'Come Into Force' contract was signed on Monday, June 7th. The contract will take effect in December this year," said an AR source.
He added that Indonesia's journey to get the Rafale plane from France is still long.

The “Come Into Force” contract will then become the basis for the Effective Contract after all agreements between Indonesia and France are reached and Indonesia has paid an advance for the purchase of 36 Rafales.
Meanwhile, until now Indonesia and France have not reached agreement points for Trade Returns, Local Content and/or Offsets (IDKLO) in terms of the planned purchase of 36 Rafale .

As is known, Law no. 16 of 2012 concerning the Defense Industry mandates that the purchase of alpalhankam (defense and security equipment) from abroad must be accompanied by an IDKLO. (...)
 
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helmutkohl

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The only overkill I see is the twin engine layout. Money spent for nothing IMOHO. But then it would have been hard to get a better deal given that France was so eager to sign a new contract.

There is, however the concerns that comes with a major NATO partner claiming it reaches the 2% threshold in defense spendings while divesting that effort in foreign sales...
yup i totally agree, something I've always said (but usually disliked by French posters on various boards)..

France should have stuck with a single engine light jet, as far as exports goes. the Mirage III and F.1 were great examples. Imagine if they made the Novi Avion!

Although yes, a twin engine medium fighter is better for France's specific needs.

I predict that if they ever get around to FCAS (lets call it Mirage 5000 because i like the Mirage name)
it'll probably be mainly used by Germany and France, maybe some other wealthy gulf state. but won't be as in high demand like the past French aircraft.
 

Archibald

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something I've always said (but usually disliked by French posters on various boards)

I feel sorry for you, really. The real story is extremely tortured.

Blame the French Air Force !

Dassault was no fool: he knew that single-engine types a) were more affordable for France and b) sold like hot cakes for export (1400 Mirage III, 700 F1 and 620 Mirage 2000 build: 2720 Mirages not counting the prototypes).
But the AdA was self-obsessed with very unaffordable twin-engine types.
I already wrote that list in many other threads
- Mirage IVC (1958 - NO - turned into a nuclear bomber)
- AFVG (1967 - NO - died)
- Mirage G4 (1968 - NO - shrunk into the G8)
- Mirage G8 (1969-72 - NO - too expensive)
- ACF (1972 - 1975 -NOOO - TOO EXPENSIVE)
- Mirage 4000 (1975 - 1988 -NOOOOOOOO - TOO EXPENSIVE, THRICE - get the 2000 instead)

Would you believe the Armée de l'Air would grow discouraged ? They had dreamed of Phantoms (once), then of F-111s (thrice), and then of F-15s (twice).

Hell, no. They argued that the F-18 could make a twin-jet affordable, and they carried the day - by the early 2000's...

SEVENTH TIME was the charm !

Dassault usually built what the Armée de l'Air wanted yet thanks to foreign sales he would also build "private ventures prototypes" - and once the AdA budget would not afford the big aircraft, he would pitch the private venture prototype - and carry the day !

The Mirage III was a happy accident born of the LWF quagmire that were the Mirage I and II

The Mirage F1 was a happy accident born out of the multiple failures of VSTOL, VG and swept wing types (F2 / F3, G, III-V...)

The Mirage 2000 was a happy accident born out of the F1M53 / ACF / 4000 failures.
 
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Wyvern

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More of the same:
Interesting quote from that article.
Speaking to The War Zone on condition of anonymity, a former Croatian Air Force MiG-21 pilot explained that he saw the Rafale as “absolute unnecessary overkill” for the country, adding that, even today, only around 30 percent of the MiG’s capabilities are actually being utilized — primarily, QRA scrambles and training for these same missions.

Describing the Rafale decision as politically motivated, he said he was concerned that no serious cost/benefit calculation had been provided for the full planned service life of the new jets and he also pointed out that the existing infrastructure at Zagreb-Pleso Air Base will require significant renovation, including modern hangars.
That is something that always got me questioning the Rafale purchase by the Croatians, it is a bit of a leap to go from a MiG-21 to a Rafale. Something like a Gripen would be more suited to their requirements.

I'm not saying that they made the wrong decision, I just found it a bit....odd.
 

TomcatViP

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@Wyvern : Well, when the USAF will start to re-sale their brand new F-15EX at 40+M€ (half the acquisition cost) with a complete weapon package at an extra 200M€ per dozen of planes and with a couple of years of included maintenance, you'll probably see even the Irish air Corps start placing order*.


*something thankfully Mr Macron has yet not think of
 
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kaiserd

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More of the same:
Interesting quote from that article.
Speaking to The War Zone on condition of anonymity, a former Croatian Air Force MiG-21 pilot explained that he saw the Rafale as “absolute unnecessary overkill” for the country, adding that, even today, only around 30 percent of the MiG’s capabilities are actually being utilized — primarily, QRA scrambles and training for these same missions.

Describing the Rafale decision as politically motivated, he said he was concerned that no serious cost/benefit calculation had been provided for the full planned service life of the new jets and he also pointed out that the existing infrastructure at Zagreb-Pleso Air Base will require significant renovation, including modern hangars.
That is something that always got me questioning the Rafale purchase by the Croatians, it is a bit of a leap to go from a MiG-21 to a Rafale. Something like a Gripen would be more suited to their requirements.

I'm not saying that they made the wrong decision, I just found it a bit....odd.

There are 2 elements to this.

ANY fighter aircraft the Croatians bought will need their associated infrastructure totally revamped so that’s an inevitability, and it would likely to be a long-term false economy to try to “get-away” with carrying over any miss-matched existing infrastructure from the MIG-21 era.

My first impression would also be that a Rafale may well be over kill for a dedicated QRA-type role and that a cheaper option may be available to do that. However it is worth querying if in this specific case some of these “cheaper” options actually are cheaper (the Gripen, for example). And given the lack of sales for the likes of the FA-50 it is notable that a lot of airforces (and their governments) don’t appear to want this class of fighter and are opting for something a bit heavier and more capable (like the Rafale in this case).
 

Hood

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Nations have always wanted 'proper' fighters if they can get their hands on them. That's why so many smaller air forces have clung onto F-86s, MiGs and F-5s in the past until they were practically flying museum pieces.
Smaller subsonic fighters like the Hawk 200, AMX or FA-50 have never sold well when the Air Marshals want afterburning thunderous displays on national days and makes their air force look potent against the neighbours.

Saying that, I must admit this Rafale revival has taken me by surprise. Ignoring any political shenanigans and AdA attempts to make the fleet look younger, it has certainly stolen a march on the Typhoon which for its last sales relied on the Middle Eastern pro-buying British market and heavy export credits too.
 

helmutkohl

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Nations have always wanted 'proper' fighters if they can get their hands on them. That's why so many smaller air forces have clung onto F-86s, MiGs and F-5s in the past until they were practically flying museum pieces.
Smaller subsonic fighters like the Hawk 200, AMX or FA-50 have never sold well when the Air Marshals want afterburning thunderous displays on national days and makes their air force look potent against the neighbours.

Saying that, I must admit this Rafale revival has taken me by surprise. Ignoring any political shenanigans and AdA attempts to make the fleet look younger, it has certainly stolen a march on the Typhoon which for its last sales relied on the Middle Eastern pro-buying British market and heavy export credits too.
More of the same:
Interesting quote from that article.
Speaking to The War Zone on condition of anonymity, a former Croatian Air Force MiG-21 pilot explained that he saw the Rafale as “absolute unnecessary overkill” for the country, adding that, even today, only around 30 percent of the MiG’s capabilities are actually being utilized — primarily, QRA scrambles and training for these same missions.

Describing the Rafale decision as politically motivated, he said he was concerned that no serious cost/benefit calculation had been provided for the full planned service life of the new jets and he also pointed out that the existing infrastructure at Zagreb-Pleso Air Base will require significant renovation, including modern hangars.
That is something that always got me questioning the Rafale purchase by the Croatians, it is a bit of a leap to go from a MiG-21 to a Rafale. Something like a Gripen would be more suited to their requirements.

I'm not saying that they made the wrong decision, I just found it a bit....odd.

There are 2 elements to this.

ANY fighter aircraft the Croatians bought will need their associated infrastructure totally revamped so that’s an inevitability, and it would likely to be a long-term false economy to try to “get-away” with carrying over any miss-matched existing infrastructure from the MIG-21 era.

My first impression would also be that a Rafale may well be over kill for a dedicated QRA-type role and that a cheaper option may be available to do that. However it is worth querying if in this specific case some of these “cheaper” options actually are cheaper (the Gripen, for example). And given the lack of sales for the likes of the FA-50 it is notable that a lot of airforces (and their governments) don’t appear to want this class of fighter and are opting for something a bit heavier and more capable (like the Rafale in this case).
to clarify

1. the KAI Golden Eagle does not lack exports. It's already been exported to 4 countries and in comparable numbers to the Gripen A-D. It would have been 5 countries had the UK not blocked the Argentine sales

2. the Golden Eagle is supersonic, not sub-sonic. It has an F404 engine (same as Gripen, Hornet, Tejas) with a proper afterburner.

3. Even the Gripen was picked up by many small European countries that are in NATO, similar to the situation Croatia is in. such as Czech and Hungary.

but I agree on the last point about the Rafale revival. I remember in the 2000s and early 2010s, people were always harping about how successful the Typhoon was and all these articles about..Will the Rafale ever gain one export? Why is the Rafale unpopular? Is the Rafale a failure?
it seems the Rafale is on track to maybe surpass the Mirage 2000 in terms of exports.
 

ssdunkel

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Ha! Rafale F4-1 will get a Scorpion HMD for the French Air Force!!!


 

Archibald

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Then again there is the very unfortunate case of Austria, which went for Typhoons and proved unable to assume them - don't know if the issues were technical, financial, maintenance costs ?
But I do know it ended very badly for the Typhoons.
This is an interesting example of a country bitting more than it could chew - but I'm not sure if Typhoons were just overkill - or if it was the Austrian air force that proved unable to use them properly ?
Coming from Drakens, must have been one hell of a generational leap for the mechanics and support teams.
 

Maro.Kyo

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Then again there is the very unfortunate case of Austria, which went for Typhoons and proved unable to assume them - don't know if the issues were technical, financial, maintenance costs ?
But I do know it ended very badly for the Typhoons.
This is an interesting example of a country bitting more than it could chew - but I'm not sure if Typhoons were just overkill - or if it was the Austrian air force that proved unable to use them properly ?
Coming from Drakens, must have been one hell of a generational leap for the mechanics and support teams.
It was simply a a very corrupt government program, which turned out to be a disaster, which in turn has not much to do with Austrian Air Force's capabilities I feel. It was already out of their control before they even received their planes, since they were getting those horrendous Tranche 1 aircrafts.

Now it seems like they are going to ditch them away sooner than later, the fate of those Tranche 1 aircrafts are pretty clear, just like the other Tranche 1s of other EF-2000 operators. Interesting to see would be which option they take as their next step and I feel Rafale is definitely up there as a candidate, provided that this time no one rigs the show with bribery.

Anyways, back to the news only.
 
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Deltafan

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Maybe another step for Rafale toward Indonesia:


To be confirmed, or not, in December...

An Airspace Review source in Jakarta said the Indonesian Ministry of Defense and Dassault Aviation (the manufacturer of the Rafale ) from France had signed an initial contract for the procurement of 36 multi-role fighter jets.
According to french articles, the "initial contract" is a "letter of intent".

Well, as said, to be confirmed, or not, in December...

Moreover, I wonder where Indonesia will find all this money ...

 
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Archibald

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Then again there is the very unfortunate case of Austria, which went for Typhoons and proved unable to assume them - don't know if the issues were technical, financial, maintenance costs ?
But I do know it ended very badly for the Typhoons.
This is an interesting example of a country bitting more than it could chew - but I'm not sure if Typhoons were just overkill - or if it was the Austrian air force that proved unable to use them properly ?
Coming from Drakens, must have been one hell of a generational leap for the mechanics and support teams.
It was simply a a very corrupt government program, which turned out to be a disaster, which in turn has not much to do with Austrian Air Force's capabilities I feel. It was already out of their control before they even received their planes, since they were getting those horrendous Tranche 1 aircrafts.

Now it seems like they are going to ditch them away sooner than later, the fate of those Tranche 1 aircrafts are pretty clear, just like the other Tranche 1s of other EF-2000 operators. Interesting to see would be which option they take as their next step and I feel Rafale is definitely up there as a candidate, provided that this time no one rigs the show with bribery.

Anyways, back to the news only.

Ok thank you for the info, I hadn't followed the Austrian quagmire closely.
 

Archibald

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Maybe another step for Rafale toward Indonesia:


To be confirmed, or not, in December...

Good news, the Ministry of Defense and Dassault have signed the initial 36 Rafale contracts

June 10, 2021

Good news from the planned purchase of defense equipment by the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia (Kemhan RI).
An Airspace Review source in Jakarta said the Indonesian Ministry of Defense and Dassault Aviation (the manufacturer of the Rafale ) from France had signed an initial contract for the procurement of 36 multi-role fighter jets.
According to french articles, the "initial contract" is a "letter of intent".

Well, as said, to be confirmed, or not, in December...

Moreover, I wonder where Indonesia will find all this money ...


It probably doesn't help Ferrero dropping palm oil from Nutella... (no insult toward Indonesia, I just vaguely remember some years ago they were to pay some military stuff with the goddam thing).
 

KimIrSen

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Maybe another step for Rafale toward Indonesia:


To be confirmed, or not, in December...

Good news, the Ministry of Defense and Dassault have signed the initial 36 Rafale contracts

June 10, 2021

Good news from the planned purchase of defense equipment by the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia (Kemhan RI).
An Airspace Review source in Jakarta said the Indonesian Ministry of Defense and Dassault Aviation (the manufacturer of the Rafale ) from France had signed an initial contract for the procurement of 36 multi-role fighter jets.
According to french articles, the "initial contract" is a "letter of intent".

Well, as said, to be confirmed, or not, in December...

Moreover, I wonder where Indonesia will find all this money ...


It probably doesn't help Ferrero dropping palm oil from Nutella... (no insult toward Indonesia, I just vaguely remember some years ago they were to pay some military stuff with the goddam thing).
Indonesia wanted to pay for part of the Su-35 order that was cancelled under US pressure with palm oil and rubber deliveries iirc.
 

eagle

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Then again there is the very unfortunate case of Austria, which went for Typhoons and proved unable to assume them - don't know if the issues were technical, financial, maintenance costs ?
But I do know it ended very badly for the Typhoons.
This is an interesting example of a country bitting more than it could chew - but I'm not sure if Typhoons were just overkill - or if it was the Austrian air force that proved unable to use them properly ?
Coming from Drakens, must have been one hell of a generational leap for the mechanics and support teams.
It was simply a a very corrupt government program, which turned out to be a disaster, which in turn has not much to do with Austrian Air Force's capabilities I feel. It was already out of their control before they even received their planes, since they were getting those horrendous Tranche 1 aircrafts.

Now it seems like they are going to ditch them away sooner than later, the fate of those Tranche 1 aircrafts are pretty clear, just like the other Tranche 1s of other EF-2000 operators. Interesting to see would be which option they take as their next step and I feel Rafale is definitely up there as a candidate, provided that this time no one rigs the show with bribery.

Anyways, back to the news only.

This is not true.
No corruption has been proved until this day.

EF's troubles in Austria are purely political. It was and basically still is the favourite object of hate for the socialist party and the general public.
 

Archibald

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(I had my share of political poison for today, and on top of that I know absolutely zero about Austrian politics, so I will carefully stay some light years away from this...)
 

Maro.Kyo

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This is not true.
No corruption has been proved until this day.

EF's troubles in Austria are purely political. It was and basically still is the favourite object of hate for the socialist party and the general public.
Ah, thanks for the correction. It seems that the investigation was dropped at the end of last year all together. I wasn't updated on this.

To avoid any misunderstandings, I should stress that I cannot care less about if it was the left wing or the right wing part who was alleged of corruption and who sued em'. It also seems to be the case that no matter how misconducted or not the program was, the Austrian AF is unhappy about the jet. They would eventually get a new fighter soon enough.
 
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helmutkohl

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Then again there is the very unfortunate case of Austria, which went for Typhoons and proved unable to assume them - don't know if the issues were technical, financial, maintenance costs ?
But I do know it ended very badly for the Typhoons.
This is an interesting example of a country bitting more than it could chew - but I'm not sure if Typhoons were just overkill - or if it was the Austrian air force that proved unable to use them properly ?
Coming from Drakens, must have been one hell of a generational leap for the mechanics and support teams.
in the old ACIG site, I recalled when news of Austria getting the typhoons, Tom was pretty excited.
but then everyone was warning him that its not that great.. much more expensive to operate and maintain compared to the Gripen offer.. AND for less capability since it was a gimped version of the Typhoon.

as for Serbia, I dont really buy that argument to be honest.
sure Croatia and Serbia has had history.. but the Serbian air force is not in the greatest shape, and i doubt their old mig-29s *slightly upgraded, are a even a threat to the FA-50 with AMRAAM, let alone a Gripen or Rafale.
even if Serbia was a threat, money better be used to invest in the Army and drones.
and in the case Russia becomes involved.. it doesnt make a huge difference if they are flying golden eagles or rafales.. they need huge support. fortunately they are in NATO.
 

stealthflanker

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Maybe another step for Rafale toward Indonesia:


To be confirmed, or not, in December...

Good news, the Ministry of Defense and Dassault have signed the initial 36 Rafale contracts

June 10, 2021

Good news from the planned purchase of defense equipment by the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Indonesia (Kemhan RI).
An Airspace Review source in Jakarta said the Indonesian Ministry of Defense and Dassault Aviation (the manufacturer of the Rafale ) from France had signed an initial contract for the procurement of 36 multi-role fighter jets.

The signing of the initial contract called the “Come Into Force” contract was signed on Monday, June 7, 2021 and will take effect in December 2021.
“The 'Come Into Force' contract was signed on Monday, June 7th. The contract will take effect in December this year," said an AR source.
He added that Indonesia's journey to get the Rafale plane from France is still long.

The “Come Into Force” contract will then become the basis for the Effective Contract after all agreements between Indonesia and France are reached and Indonesia has paid an advance for the purchase of 36 Rafales.
Meanwhile, until now Indonesia and France have not reached agreement points for Trade Returns, Local Content and/or Offsets (IDKLO) in terms of the planned purchase of 36 Rafale .

As is known, Law no. 16 of 2012 concerning the Defense Industry mandates that the purchase of alpalhankam (defense and security equipment) from abroad must be accompanied by an IDKLO. (...)

Well the concern is whether our Minister of Finance are willing to provide its approval. The amount of initial deposit hasnt been disclosed but it's in hundreds of millions of Euros as far as i heard.

There is already lenders which will help financing the deal, but this again depend on our Minister of Finance to actually take the loan and approve it as funding source for the aircrafts.
 

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