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Author Topic: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics  (Read 35175 times)

Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« on: January 03, 2006, 11:32:26 am »
Thread for Typhoon avionics
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Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Typhoon Displays
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2006, 11:35:48 am »
Here are some shots of the Typhoon MFD displays

Sources
« Last Edit: January 03, 2006, 11:57:39 am by overscan »
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Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: Typhoon Displays
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2006, 11:39:30 am »
« Last Edit: January 03, 2006, 12:14:26 pm by overscan »
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Offline Scorpion82

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2006, 01:31:24 pm »
Captor radar (my post from acig.org updated):

History:
The CAPTOR radar was developed since 1990 by the EuroRadar consortium (GEC Marconi, DASA, INISEL and FIAR). Initinally the radar was called ECR-90 (European Collaborative Radar - 90). The radar is based on the Blue Vixen radar of the Sea Harrier FMK.2, but it's at all a completly new design.
The first test version ECR-90A was tested in 1993 in a BAC-111. The B-version was an improved version, after there were some problems with the original version. The ECR-90C was the first Eurofighter compatible version and was integrated into the DA5 (second german single seat prototype) which had it's maiden flight on 24th February in 1997. The production of the radar begun in 1998, the development of the series version of the radar ended in 1999. The name CAPTOR is used since the year 2000. The first production version of the CAPTOR was delivered 21th june 2001.
619 CAPTOR radars will be build.

Design:
The CAPTOR is a digital impulse doppler multi-mode radar, it consists of 61 SRIs and 6 LRIs and weights ~170 kg. The performance lies between 30kV amd 50 kV. The radar works in the X-band frequency with 8-12 Ghz. It chooses automatically between low, medium and high pulse reputation frequencies, which can lie between 1000 and 200000 impulses per second.
The CAPTOR also uses the so called Data Adaptive Scanning (DAS) technology to minimize the movement of the mechanical array.
The software is written in ADA on a MIL STD 2167A and contain a code of 1,2 million lines.
The CAPTOR uses three channels: 1st for target search, 2nd for target track and the 3rd for identification and countering of enemy ECM.

Modes:
The CAPTOR provides a wide range of different AA- and AG-modes. The following modes are available:

BVR AA-modes:
- RWS (Range While Scan)
- TWS (Track While Scan)
- VS (Velocity Search)

CAC AA-modes:
- Boresight Acquisition
- Vertical Acquisition
- Slaved Acquisition
- HUD Acquisition.

AG-modes:
- Sea
- DBS/SAR (Doppler Beam Sharpening/Synthetic Aperature Radar)
- GMTI/T (Ground Moving Target Indication/Track)
- AG-Ranging
- PVU (Precision Velocity Update)
- TA (Terrain Avoidance).
- FTT (Fixed Target Track)

The radar also provides look up/down and shoot up/down capabilities, raid assessment and a non cooporative target recognition (NCTR) function.
Also it is able to create a 3-D picture from the airspace which provides the pilot a better overview about the situation into the airspace.


Performance:
The CAPTOR radar is able to lock onto a large target (like a transporter) at distances of over 300 km and on a fighter sized target at distances above 160 km. The radar is able to track up to 20 targets at once and can engage 6 of them. All targets are track by priority and the radar can collect detailed informations about the primary tracked one. A target change will be automatically undertaken when a missile is fired at one target.
The array can be moved +-60° in azimuth and elevation.


Handling:
The radar functions can all be handled with the VTAS controls. Much functions are automatized. The array will be normally moved automatically and the radar switches automatically between the different modes.


Captor-D:
The Captor-D is the proposed modell for tranche 2 aircraft using new PowerPC processors with a new chip architecture. The D-Version features a 0,3 m resolution SAR mode and improved ECCM as well as full AG-modes which will not all be available for Captor-C in tranche 1.
The radar is designed with later AESA retrofit in mind.

AMSAR/CAESAR:
The AMSAR /Airborne Multi-Mode Solid-State Active-Array Radar) programme was started back in 1993 by the government founded GTDAR consortium with the aim to research and develope the AESA fighter radar technology. In 2003 german and british industry started the CECAR as a strand of AMSAR to develope a Captor specific AESA. The industry founded CAESAR (Captor AESA Radar) demonstrator developed by the EuroRadar consortium was fully integrated and tested on the ground before it made its first flight aboard a BAC-1-11 on 24th February 2006. The current modell is close to a production modell and will be available ~2010 as a retrofit to the Captor-D or as a new radar for Tranche 3 aircraft. The AESA antenna consists of  1500 T/R-modules with an output of 10 W each.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2006, 03:22:19 pm by Scorpion82 »

Offline JCage

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2006, 05:02:49 am »
Scorpion, the Captor should also have raid assessment.

This is what Michal Fiszer says about the Captor. Relevant excerpts

Typhoon Arises
Eurofighter's plane finally comes in
by Michal Fiszer
Sep. 15, 2005


Attack and Identification System (AIS)

All of the Typhoon's major sensors were integrated into a single Attack and Identification System (AIS). The AIS has been integrated with the use of the 1,000-Mbit/sec. STANAG 3910 optical data bus. A similar data bus has been used for navigation-avionics integration, while five 100-Mbit/sec. MilStd 1553 data buses were used to integrate other systems. The AIS mainly consists of the Captor radar, the Pirate infrared (IR) sensor, and the MIDS tactical data-exchange system, as well as associated processing systems. Two powerful computers based on Motorola 68020 processors are used in the AIS: the Avionics Computer (AC) and the Navigation Computer (NC). Both fully exchange information between one another (i.e., data from the navigation computer are also used for attack solutions, and vice versa).

The $394.2-million contract for development of a production radar was awarded to the EuroRADAR consortium on March 16, 1989. It was initially known as the ECR-90, and the production unit was called the "C-Model," as is common practice in the British defense industry. In September 2000, the radar was named Captor. The first production Captor radar was delivered in March 2001. At the same time, the development example of Captor radar successfully flew in Germany on aircraft DA5.



The DASS for Spain's Typhoons will include all of the systems, save the laser-warning receiver. However, inclusion of the laser warner is still under consideration.
Eurofighter
The Captor is a multimode radar, working in the I/J-band frequency range (8-12 GHz). It has a mechanically steered, grooved, flat (planar) metal antenna, with a diameter of 70 cm. Four electrical servos are used for quick antenna movements horizontally and vertically. The selection of a mechanical scan over a passive electronically scanned antenna was made, because it was assessed that such a solution was proven, and an advanced mechanically scanned antenna could offer better performance than an early electronically scanned antenna. It is now expected that, in the future, the radar will receive an active electronically scanning array (AESA).

The 193-kg Captor is a modular design with 61 shop-replaceable units (SPUs) and six line-replaceable units (LRUs). The LRUs are the two receivers, two transmitters, the antenna, and the processor. The radar processor can perform three-billion operations per second and works with the use of ADA software compatible with MIL-STD 2167A. Three separate data-processing channels are used to enable the radar to perform various modes simultaneously. The radar can observe 60 degrees to the left and right horizontally (some sources claim 70 degrees), and the radar range is at least 160 km for targets with an RCS of 5 sq m. Large targets, such as transport aircraft, can be detected at distances of up to 300 km. The radar has several air-to-air modes in which high-, medium-, and low-pulse-repetition-frequency regimes are used. The available range of pulse-repetition-frequencies (PRFs) is from 1 to 20 KHz. Among the air-to-air modes are range-while-scan (RWS), track-while-scan (TWS), and velocity search (VS). All of the modes are used for BVR engagement with the use of AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles or, in the future, with the use of Meteors. In track-while-scan mode, 20 targets can be simultaneously tracked, and up to six (some sources says eight) can be simultaneously engaged. Range-while-scan is used for initial target detection, with the radar emitting at low PRF and high power. Velocity scan is used for prioritization of the targets detected, and the radar switches to medium PRF. Track-while-scan is the basic mode for air combat and engagement of enemy aircraft. Also, a single-target-track mode is available for engagement of a remote target at the edge of the missile's range. Additionally, the radar has a raid-assessment function that distinguishes individual targets within a group of targets, along with a non-cooperative recognition mode that evaluates target characteristics (counting engine-compressor blades, RCS measurement, etc.) to identify a type of aircraft. The Captor radar also has look-down/shoot-down capabilities. A unique radar feature is the ability to present returns on two multifunction displays in the cockpit, in the vertical and horizontal view, giving the pilot a three-dimensional situational picture.

The MIDS is also extensively used for BVR engagement. It enables the exchange of information between eight Typhoons in formation and with an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft, as well as with a ground-based station, such as the nearest air-operations center (AOC). The aircraft typically attack in pairs, with the leading aircraft well forward and having its radar switched off and the trailing aircraft with the radar turned on. When targets are detected, the lead aircraft silently approaches with its radar in stand-by mode but not emitting. The attack is conducted silently, and, according to some sources, even the mid-course update can be accomplished based on information from the trailing aircraft. In the case of enemy attack, the leading aircraft can perform a break maneuver, and the second aircraft accelerates to engage.

The Captor also has several dogfight modes. For the search and track of maneuvering targets, the vertical-search mode conducts scans in vertical surface sweeps rather than horizontally in descending or ascending bars. There is also a boresight mode for designating a target visible on the head-up display (HUD) and a slaved mode for designating an air target with the use of helmet-mounted cueing system.

The Captor radar will also have some air-to-ground modes, which will be introduced in Tranche 2 aircraft (see below). A Doppler beam-sharpening (DBS) mode will provide a ground picture of one-meter resolution. A synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mode with 0.3-meter resolution is to be available, as well as ground-moving-target-indication/track (GMTI/T) and fixed-ground-target-track (FTT) modes. The range of the SAR is to be 80 km. A sea-surface-search-and-track mode is to have a range of 130 km. As for other modes, a ground-target rangefinding (GR) mode and a terrain-avoidance mode are to be introduced in Tranche 2. All the above modes are to support various weapons types that could be used against ground or naval targets.

In 1992, the EuroFIRST consortium was selected to develop and deliver the forward-looking-infrared/infrared-search-and-track (FLIR/IRST) unit for Eurofighter. The consortium consisted of FIAR (Milano, Italy) as a leading company, Pilkington Optronics (Glasgow, UK, now Thales Optronics LTd), and Tecnobit (Madrid, Spain). The Passive Infrared Airborne Tracking Equipment (PIRATE) system is to be introduced in a basic version for Tranch 1/Block 5 aircraft and in a full version from Block 8. Full integration with other aircraft systems will be achieved on Tranche 2/Block 10 aircraft, except for German aircraft. The system will use a CCD-type FLIR camera with dual wavebands (3-5 and 8-11 microns). The processing speed of the PIRATE is to be up to 24-million pixels per second. The system will have a long range and a wide sector of search (detailed figures are classified) and will also be able to track multiple targets. Unofficial figures say the maximum range will be about 145 km in favorable conditions, with a 40-km identification range. Up to 200 targets will be able to be observed at a time, with tracking of several in a selected sector. The maximum observation sector, again according to unconfirmed information, is to be 75 degrees horizontally. Despite its name, the full version of PIRATE will also be able to track a designated ground target and present its picture on the helmet-mounted display. It will also be used as a navigation and landing aid. Air-to-air modes will include multiple-target track (MTT), single-target track (STT), and single-target identification (STI).


Offline Scorpion82

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2006, 03:21:25 pm »
Right it has, I forgot to mention it. I edit it above.

Offline Gorka L Martinez Mezo

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EADS flight tests Typhoon AESA radar
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2006, 10:14:59 am »
Initial flight tests with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar designed to equip the German-Italian-Spanish-UK Eurofighter Typhoon fighter aircraft have been successful, EADS Defence Electronics (Ulm, Germany) said at the ILA 2006 air show in Berlin.

Flight trials in a real Typhoon are now anticipated to take place possibly later in 2006, depending on Eurofighter test aircraft availability.

The tests, held earlier this year -- using a BAC One-Eleven flying testbed aircraft -- at Bournemouth, southern England, involved the prototype of a future electronically scanning Captor-E derivative of the mechanically scanning Captor radar that is currently in production for the Typhoon Tranche 2 aircraft, said Dr Elmar Compans, head of the company's sensors department.

The prototype is known as CAESAR (Captor AESA Radar) and features an array with a classified number (between 1,000-2,000) of transmit/receive (T/R) modules. Its diameter is "slightly larger" than the mechanically scanned antenna that is now on Captor.

CAESAR has been developed since April 2002 by the four-country Euroradar consortium, led by Selex in the UK and including EADS Defence & Security in Germany; Galileo Avionica in Italy; and Indra in Spain.

Compans described the current mechanically scanning Typhoon radar, which he referred to as "Captor-M", as a "high-end multifunction X-band (10 GHz) pulse-Doppler radar with a modular architecture and more than 30 operational modes for air-to-air and air-to-ground operations". The radar, developed and produced by Euroradar (and delivered to BAE Systems in Warton, England), has a high resistance against electronic countermeasures and multitarget capability including track-while-scan, he said.

Scanning, however, is done by mechanically pointing the radar's antenna, which means that "a lot of time is wasted moving the antenna so that relatively little time can be spent on analysing targets", Compans added, "particularly if several targets spread out in space have to be tracked.

"By moving to an AESA radar, featuring an array packed with many hundreds of independently controlled [T/R] modules, it would become possible to do zero- delay switching between differ- ent look-angles
of the antenna, greatly enhancing the track-while-scan process."

Another advantage is the ability to introduce adaptive power management, which means that the radar's computer uses no more transmitting power than is needed to obtain the required information for each individual target -- resulting in a reduced probability that hostile forces can intercept the radar's signals.

Furthermore, the large number of T/R modules means that an AESA radar is not immediately in trouble if components start to fail, a process known as graceful degradation. "Performance degradation becomes
visible only after about 10 per cent of the T/R modules become extinct; you can lose around 100 before you have to cancel the mission," Compans explained.

In the fully developed version, a future Captor-E radar features multichannel signal processing and space-time adaptive processing, allowing the radar to distinguish between a moving target on the
ground and the ground clutter (ground moving target indication -- GMTI). The radar is also capable of adaptive beamforming, which includes the generation of multiple independent beams by dividing up the AESA array into sub-arrays. This is useful for jammer suppression.

According to Compans, an AESA fighter radar such as Captor-E will be able to simultaneously perform search, track, datalink, synthetic aperture radar imaging and other functions.

CAESAR was started in 2002 as a Euroradar-funded technology- demonstrator project. It was backed by a bilateral German-UK Captor radar e-scan risk-reduction project known as CECAR, which started in 2003.

According to Compans, CAESAR and CECAR objectives are to:

· perform experimental flight trials to demonstrate the feasibility of e-scan technology and its potential operational benefits;

· make maximum use of existing Captor radar subsystems;

· gathering data on the performance of the AESA array placed inside the standard Captor radome so that the radar's air-to-air radar modes could be optimised;

· de-risking the possible development and integration of an e-scan radar by identifying critical integration issues early on; and

· demonstrating the e-scan radar capabilities of the four Euroradar companies.

"The concept for CAESAR was to take the existing Captor radar; to replace its mechanically scanned antenna with the new AESA array, and to leave the whole of the back-end as it is, with the exception of
the antenna control unit and the antenna power supply unit. All Eurofighter avionics also remain unchanged. In terms of the new array there are no weight or centre of gravity issues that the aircraft cannot deal with.

"We believe that this evolutionary approach toward introducing an AESA radar on board Typhoon is the only way that it will be affordable for the customers." However, the proposed Captor-E is still expected to be more expensive than the standard Captor-M, Compans admitted. "It will certainly not be a factor two more expensive, but it will not be factor one," he said.

The SMTRM T/R modules in the CAESAR prototype are based on expertise gathered by EADS Defence Electronics in several other programmes, including the French-German-UK AMSAR fighter radar technology
programme, the SOSTAR-X airborne ground surveillance radar programme, the MEADS air-defence radar, the TERRA-SAR space-based radar and the BÜR next-generation ground-surveillance radar.

The standardised modular T/R modules (known as SMTRMs, size 64.4x13.5x4.5 mm) for CAESAR were completed by EADS Defence Electronics in April 2004, after which integration of the AESA array plus ground and environmental tests started in Ulm in July 2004.
Around that time, EADS also performed a fit check using a German Eurofighter at Manching, Germany, to verify that the CAESAR array would actually fit with the mechanical interfaces and the radome. In May 2005, the array was shipped to Selex in the UK where it was integrated with the rest of the radar.

In September 2005, the first transmission test of the complete CAESAR system was done, followed by: system integration in November 2005, installation on the BAC One-Eleven flying testbed aircraft at FR
Aviation in Bournemouth in December 2005/January 2006 and flight tests starting on 24 February 2006.

The flight-test campaign involved seven missions during which a total of 50 test runs were made over Wiltshire county in the southwest of England. "The AESA array operated successfully for more than 20 hours within one single T/R module failure," Compans stated. For the campaign, two aircraft were available to fly co-operative target profiles (these were an Alpha Jet A jet trainer and a Hawker Siddeley 748 twin-turboprop aircraft). "These targets were detected and tracked, including during crossing and weaving manoeuvres, while it was also possible to distinguish between them when they were flying
in close formation," said Compans.

"Various targets of opportunity were also detected and tracked. Data recording was successful and we have demonstrated track revisiting [looking back at targets detected earlier]. For cost reasons, the
CAESAR array was not fully populated with T/R modules, but approximately 75 per cent." The flight tests on the BAC One-Eleven involved the radar operating at "limited range but still representative of the full-up system". The AESA array's datalink capability was not included.

According to Compans, the CAESAR and CECAR projects have opened the door to full-scale development of the Captor-E radar for Typhoon Tranche 3, deliveries of which are scheduled to start in 2012. "That
means the radar deliveries are to start in 2011, and that means that there is less than six years left for development, industrialisation and production. We propose to use the existing back-end of the Captor
as is used in Tranche 2, as this is basically e-scan ready. The AESA array and the new LRUs [line-replacable units] are to be inserted in a plug-and-play fashion while the main avionics software would also not need to be changed.

"The intention is that the first production Captor-E sets should have the same functionalities that are now available in the Tranche 2 variant. Some easily implemented 'low hanging fruits' may also be added, but more difficult new capabilities will probably be introduced later as part of the radar's growth path."

In case the Tranche 3 aircraft are not built (Compans stressed that the contract for them has been signed), the Captor-E radar could be retrofitted into the fleet of Tranche 2 aircraft.

"The next step now is to perform CAESAR flight tests on board a real Typhoon aircraft, the main goal being to check out the radar's features in relation with the overall weapons system. There is no date fixed for this yet, but I would be disappointed if it did not take place during 2006," Compans said. He could not say at which location the Typhoon AESA flight trials will happen, but added that he "would be happy with any location as long as it happens".

Euroradar completed deliveries of Captor radars for Eurofighter Typhoon Tranche 1 at the beginning of 2006. The Tranche 1 version of Captor cannot be readily converted to an AESA radar because it features older, less performant processing technology. The Tranche 2 Captor radar that is now in production has the latest processing equipment and features a high-resolution ground-mapping mode that is not available in Tranche 1.

Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2006, 08:15:14 am »
Scorpion82's article here :

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=394.0

Has a good description of the Typhoon avionics.
"They can't see our arses for dust."
 
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Offline Scorpion82

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2006, 06:22:57 am »
Eurofighter Typhoon avionics overview by Scorpion82:

General:
Typhoon's avionics are built to the federated concept, with each system using its own computers to perform various processes. More than 80 computers in 5 families flying aboard the aircraft, many of them are there for redundancy reasons. All the avionics are divided into 7 sub-systems which are linked to each other by 5 MIL STD 1553B and 2 STANAG-3910 databusses.

Subsystems include:
- cockpit instrumentation & control elements
- attack, identification and navigation
- DASS
- Communication
- IFF
- Utility Control System
- Armament controls system

Additional subsystem bus systems include a MIL STD 1760 weapon interface bus and the flight control system bus.

Specific Systems:

UCS:
Utility Control System to control the different utilities. The UCS consists of 6 computers which are linked via a MIL STD 1553B databus to the other avionics. The six computers include:
- 2x fuel computers
- 2x SPS computers
- landing gear computer
- front computer+maintainance display panel (on the left airliftintake)

IMRS:
The integrated monitoring and recording system features audio- and video recorders as well as the digital flight data recorder. It includes a fully integrated and automated seft-diagnostic system ensuring automatic fault detection and indication in the case of a critical systems failure.

HMS:
The health monitoring system uses 20 sensors to monitor the airframe and engine status. Data are collected ever 1/16 second. The HMS enables on condition maintainance and increases flight safety.

Communication:
Typhoon's communication systems are integrated into the CAMU (cockpit audio management unit) which comprises warning sound genration, direct voice input and direct voice output. There are 2 sets of XT622P1 VHF/UHF radios developed by Rohde & Schwarz, BAE Systems, ELMER and ENOSA. The UHF radios are built to the SATURN standard (Second generation ANTI-jam Tactical UHF RADIO for NATO) ensuring a secured and jamming resistant over crypted channels.

Navigation:
The comprehensive navigation suite enables autonomous, day/night and allweather operations. Single systems include:
- Litton LN-93EF laser inertial navigation system
- GPS receiver
- Smith Industries radar altimeter
- Instrument-/Microwave landing systems (ILS/MLS)
- TACAN and DME-P
- digital map generator (DMG)
- BAE Systems TERPROM II (Terrain Profile Matching)

Autopilot:
The autopilot offers a number of modes and is able to catch and hold speed, altitude and heading. In some modes the autopilot offers automatic terrain following. Specific modes include:
- Tracking
- Heading
- Auto Throttle
- Climb
- Altitude stabilization
- Attack
- Approach

The system can also fly CAPs and offers flight director modes for airborne interceptions.

DASS:
The Defensive Aids Sub System consists of abput 20 LRUs and is fully integrated within the airframe. It ensures threat detection, identification and priorization at long ranges and automatically activates the best suited counter measures. Single components include:
DAC: Defensive Aids Computer consisting of 5 Radstone Technologies PowerPC processors to control the entire DASS
ESM: Using superheterodyne digital receiver antennas in the wingtip pods. Electronics support messures ensure:
- 360° RF emitter detection up to 100 km+
- Frequency coverage 100 MHz to 10 GHz+
- direction finding with an accuracy better than 1°
- ranging via sequential triangulation and amplitute measurement
- Emitter type identification and differentiation between operating modes like search, acquisition or missile guidance
- IFF
- threat priorization
- Lethal zone indication taking into account terrain profiles
LWR: 6 Selex Sensors & Airborne Systems laser warning sensor for detection and direction finding of laser range-finding and targeting systems, with full spherical azimuth coverage. 3 pairs of sensors in the forward and rear fuselage. (RAF only, EdA maybe)
MAW: 3 active missile approach warners based on pulse doppler mm wave radars. 2 in the wing roots and 1 at the base of the fin. Ensure missile detection and tracking up to 100 km with full azimuth coverage. Threat priorization and linked to the flare dispensers. The DASS suggests evasive manoeuvres using HuD symbols.
ECM: Fully integrated and automated electronic counter measures system with same spherical and frequency coverage as ESM. Using DRFM, a technics generator and PESA. The system can jam multiple threats simultanously.
X-Eye: Jamming technic requiring a second rearward looking antenna. Offered as option and might be used by italian aircraft
TRD: Up to 2 BAE Systems Ariel towed radar decoys on a 100 m cevlar cable. Effective against monopulse, TWS and command-line-of-sight radars. Twice as effective as the internal ECM
Decoys: 2xSpA Elettronica flare dispensers with 16 rounds each in the inner trailing edge flaperon actuators and 2xSaab BOL 510 chaff dispensers with 160 packages each in the outboard missile launch rails. Automatically deployed by the DAC, AIS or MAW.


Captor radar:
Design characteristics:
The Captor is a digital impulse doppler multi-mode fire control radar.
- Modulare designe comprising 6 LRIs, which consist of 61 SRIs
- weight ~170 kg
- TWT with output of 30-50 kVA
- Receiver with 3 data processing channels (detection, tracking and ECCM)
- mechanically steered planar array with a diameter of 70 cm, driven by 4 smarium-cobalt servomotors.
- Data Adaptive Scanning
- X-Band frequency range (8-12 GHz)
- Variable pulse repetition frequency between 1000 and 200000 pulses/sec
- Radar computer consists of 17 processors, 5 of which are fully programmeable (including digital signal processing) and performs up to 3 bln operations/second
- Software written in ADA to the MIL STD 2167A standard consisting of a 1.2 million lines long code
- 31 operating modes and submodes and functions


Modes:
The CAPTOR provides a wide range of different AA- and AG-modes. The following modes are available:

BVR AA-modes:
- RWS (Range While Scan)
- TWS (Track While Scan)
- VS (Velocity Search)

CAC AA-modes:
- Boresight Acquisition
- Vertical Acquisition
- Slaved Acquisition
- HUD Acquisition.

AA-submodes:
- STT (Single Target Track)

AG-modes:
- Sea
- DBS/SAR (Doppler Beam Sharpening/Synthetic Aperature Radar)
- GMTI/T (Ground Moving Target Indication/Track)
- AG-Ranging
- PVU (Precision Velocity Update)
- TA (Terrain Avoidance).
- FTT (Fixed Target Track)

The radar also provides look up/down and shoot up/down capabilities, raid assessment and a non cooporative target recognition (NCTR) function.
It is also able to create a 3-D picture from the airspace which provides the pilot a better overview about the situation into the airspace. It features an automatic IFF system, an integrated fighter-missile datalink and automatically prioritizes all threats in TWS mode.

Performance:
The CAPTOR radar is able to lock onto a large target (like a transporter) at distances of over 300 km and on a fighter sized target at distances above 160 km. The radar is able to track up to 20 targets at once and can engage 6 of them. All targets are tracked by priority and the radar can collect detailed informations about the primary tracked one. A target change will be automatically undertaken when a missile is fired at one target.
The array can be moved +-60° in azimuth and elevation.

Handling:
The radar functions can all be handled with the VTAS controls. Much functions are automatized. The array will be normally moved automatically and the radar switches automatically between the different modes.


Captor-D:
The Captor-D is the proposed modell for tranche 2 aircraft using new PowerPC processors with a new chip architecture. The D-Version features a 0,3 m resolution SAR mode and improved ECCM as well as full AG-modes which will not all be available for Captor-C in tranche 1.
The radar is designed with later AESA retrofit in mind.

AMSAR/CAESAR:
The AMSAR /Airborne Multi-Mode Solid-State Active-Array Radar) programme was started back in 1993 by the government founded GTDAR consortium with the aim to research and develope the AESA fighter radar technology. In 2003 german and british industry started the CECAR as a strand of AMSAR to develope a Captor specific AESA. The industry founded CAESAR (Captor AESA Radar) demonstrator developed by the EuroRadar consortium was fully integrated and tested on the ground before it made its first flight aboard a BAC-1-11 on 24th February 2006. The current modell is close to a production modell and will be available ~2010 as a retrofit to the Captor-D or as a new radar for Tranche 3 aircraft. The AESA antenna consists of  1500 T/R-modules with an output of 10 W each.

PIRATE:
The PIRATE (Passive Infrared Airborne Tracking Equipement) is a 3rd generation dual-band infrared sensor with image processing capabilities.

Design:
- Image processing speed is 24 mln pixel/second
- azimuth coverage up to +/-75°
- wavelength 3-5 and 8-11 micron

Roles:
The PIRATE acts as IRST and FLIR. Modes include:
- Multiple Target Track
- Single Target Track
- Single Target Track Identification
- Sector Acquisition
- Slaved Acquision
- kinematically raning
- Thermal cueing for ground targets
- FLIR image generation with output on HuD, HMD and/or MHDD

MIDS:
The MIDS datalink (Multifunction Information Distribution System) is LINK-16 compatible and offers secured bi-directional communication and dataexchange. Functions include:
- Transmission of sensor pictures and target data
- position data exchange
- secured voice communication
- text messaging

AIS:
The Attack & Identification System consists of two identical computers, designated AC and NC. The system fuses navigation and sensor data, increasing data reliability and overall sensor capabilities, while enhancing the pilots situational awerness and reducing workload.

EMCON:
The DASS features an emission controll function to reduce active RF emissions. The system has the full authority to control all RF emissions. Signature profiles can be saved in the missions computer.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cockpit systems follow soon.

Scorpion82

Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2006, 06:53:35 am »
Typhoon MHDD (Smiths Industries)
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Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2007, 03:32:33 pm »
Quote
EF2000/IRST

TECNOBIT forma parte junto a GALILEO AVIONICA y THALES OPTRONICS del consorcio EUROFIRST que desarrolla el sistema FLIR/IRST del Eurofighter.

Este sistema, denominado comercialmente PIRATE, constituye el estado del arte en este tipo de sensores.

PIRATE aúna a las capacidades típicas de visión por Infra-rojo la capacidad de detección y seguimiento automático de múltiples blancos, esto es, actúa como un radar, pero sin necesidad de emitir señal alguna con lo aumenta significativamente la capacidad "stealth" del avión y su superioridad en el combate.

PIRATE es capaz de realizar un seguimiento automático de más de 500 blancos simultáneamente y de detectar aviones a distancias superiores a 74Km.

TECNOBIT participa en otros programas IRST nacionales que desarrollan esta tecnología en otros campos.

Tecnobit website
« Last Edit: July 13, 2007, 03:34:09 pm by overscan »
"They can't see our arses for dust."
 
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Offline Pit

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2007, 07:45:57 am »
How can a passive IRST system that have difficulties with range-ranging track 500 targets and a radar no more than 30?

How do you explain those tremendous history tracking capabilities of an advanced IRST?

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2014, 06:11:18 am »
http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2014/11/better-late-never/

Quote
Its seems that the Euro-fighter partner nations have finally got together and signed a development and integration contract for the AESA radar for the Typhoon.

Details are a little thin on the ground but its seems likely that the RAF will be the first force to take delivery of the Captor E Scan radar.

One of the key features of the Captor E scan radar is supposedly incorporation of the Electronic Attack Capability pioneered in the Bright Adder Radar.

A Typhoon carrying SPEAR 3 missiles with the Praetorian DASS and Captor E Scan should give the aircraft a fairly potent capability against enemy air defences and hopefully go some way to offset the capability gaps left with the retirement of the ALARM missile  and Tornado.

To the Stars


Offline DWG

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Re: Eurofighter Typhoon Avionics
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2017, 09:07:40 am »
Largely missing from the description of avionics here is the Flight Control System, to which the Autopilot is largely an add-on module. Feeding into the multiply-redundant Primary Flight Control Computers are the Air Data System, and the pilot's inceptors - throttle and stick. The FCS offers full carefree handling, the ability to move the inceptors to any extreme at any point in the envelope, from any other extreme, without the aircraft departing controlled flight.