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Gerhard Fieseler Aircraft

Cy-27

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Following the sad passing of the author Manfred Griehl last November, I doubt his pending volume on Fieseler (Fieseler: Flugzeuge seit 1933 - Typenkompass) will ever see publication. This is a great shame as Gerhard Fieseler was a World War I fighter ace who was also a stunt, aerobatic and test pilot (similar to Udet) who firm is neglected somewhat in aviation history.

His firm was not prolific but did produce one of the finest STOL aircraft of all time, the Fi 156 Storch as well as giving us the infamous V-1 "Doodlebug".

Please find below some brief notes on his firms output. I hope this may be added to and correct where necessary, at some point.

Fieseler

Gerhard Fieseler, (b. April 15, 1896 d. September 1, 1987) was a pioneering German fighter pilot, aerobatic flyer, and aircraft designer.

F1 Tigerscwalbe - Acrobatic sportsplane (1930)
This aircraft was built as a single-seat Raab-Katzenstein RK-26 Tigerschwalbe (Tiger Swallow) and was used by Gerhard Fieseler as an aerobatic demonstration aircraft. n 1930 Fieseler started his own company and refurbished the RK-26 into a two-seater and redesignated it Fieseler F.1. See also http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,11929.msg115499.html#msg115499

F2 Tiger - Acrobatic sportsplane (1932)
The Fieseler F2 Tiger was a German single-seat aerobatic biplane which was flown to victory in the 1934 World Aerobatics Competition (WAC) by its designer/builder. The F2 Tiger itself would form the basis for later planes, including the Fieseler F5. Later designated Fi 2.

F3 Wesp - Flying Wing (1932)
A competition delta-wing aircraft built by Gerhard Fieseler ito take part in the Europarundflug 1932. The design had the backing of the Haus Bergmann cigarette company. The new type had two motors in tandem with two crew in a covered cockpit sitting between them. The flying wing was chosen for the best placement of the rear engine. Which drove two British seven-cylinder Pobjoy Niagara R radial engines , each with 75/85 hp. For the construction Fieseler of the three prototype examples he made use of Dr. Alexander Lippisch who was very experienced in the field of flying wings. Because of the Europarundflug competition rules, the wing was also to be foldable.

F4 - Touring Aircraft (1932)
The Fieseler F 4 was designed, built and flown as a two-seat sports and touring aircraft in the Fieseler aircraft. Gerhard Fieseler was not satisfied despite good performance of the machine and stopped the activities prior to the start of production.

F5 - Acrobatic Sportsplane & Trainer (1933)
The F 5 was a low-wing tandem two-seat monoplane which retained the fabric-covered steel-tube fuselage of the earlier Fieseler F 4 but introduced a new two-spar cantilever wing. It had a fixed conventional landing gear with a tail-skid and the tandem open-cockpit were fitted with dual-controls. Behind the rear seat was a large luggage locker, the top decking at the rear could be removed to carry a spare propeller or skis. More than 29 built. Later re-designated Fi 5.

F6 - Sportsplane Project (1933)
Modified F 5 aircraft fitted with a uprated Hirth HM.60R engine.

F5R - Acrobatic Sportsplane (1934)
Modified F 5 aircraft fitted with a revised wing, registration D-EBIX allocated.

Fi 97 - Competition & tourer (1934)
The Fieseler Fi 97 was a single-engine 1930s German four-seat cabin touring and competition monoplane aircraft. Following the success of their two-seat tourer/trainer the Fieseler F5, Fieseler were encouraged by the RLMto develop a four-seat version specially to take part in the European touring plane championship Challenge 1934. Designed by Kurt Arnolt, it was a mixed-construction low-wing cantilever monoplane with a conventional tail unit. The fuselage had a fabric-covered steel tubing frame. The wing structure was wood and was covered with fabric and plywood. The wings were able to be folded aft for storage or ground transport. The tailskid undercarriage was fixed. The pilot and three passengers had an enclosed cabin. Five examples completed, three aircraft were fitted with the Hirth HM 8U, 250 hp inverted V8 engine, and two used the Argus As 17A, 225 hp inverted 6-cylinder inline engine. Both engines are air-cooled. The plane had STOL capabilities and the most significant design aspect was the wing's high-lift devices to enable the aircraft to be flown at low speeds.

Fi 98 - Dive bomber (1935)
Biplane fighter and dive-bomber, three prototypes built only.

Fi 99 Jungtiger - Light utility (1938)
A sports aircraft prototype, produced by Fieseler company. The aircraft was a low-wing two-seat aircraft with an enclosed cabin. It was powered by a Hirth HM 506 A engine, producing 160 hp (119 kW).

Fi 103 (V-1) - Unmanned Flying Bomb (1942)
The V-1 pulse-jet was developed at Peenemünde Army Research Centre by the German Luftwaffe during the Second World War. During initial development it was known by the codename "Cherry Stone". The Fi 103 was also known as FZG 76 (FZG = Flak-Zielgerät = Anti-Aircraft Gun Targeting Device; misleading designation assigned for deception of the Allies), and as V-1 Vergeltungswaffe (Vengeance Weapon) number one. The designation was assigned by the German propaganda machine.

Fi 103R Reichenberg - Piloted Suicide Aircraft
The Fieseler Fi 103R, code-named Reichenberg, was a late-World War II German manned version of the V-1 flying bomb produced for attacks in which the pilot was likely to be killed (as with the Japanese Ohka rocket-powered suicide anti-ship missile) or at best to parachute down at the attack site, which were to be carried out by the "Leonidas Squadron", Group V of the Luftwaffe's Kampfgeschwader 200. The V-1 was transformed into the Reichenberg by adding a small, cramped cockpit at the point of the fuselage that was immediately ahead of the pulsejet's intake, where the standard V-1's compressed-air cylinders were fitted. The cockpit had basic flight instruments and a plywood bucket seat. The single-piece canopy incorporated an armoured front panel and opened to the side to allow entry. The two displaced compressed-air cylinders were replaced by a single one, fitted in the rear in the space which normally accommodated the V-1's autopilot. The wings were fitted with hardened edges to cut the cables of barrage balloons. The aircfaft was to be taken to its target be Heinkel He.111.

Fi 103R-I - Experimental Glider
The basic single-seat unpowered glider.

Fi 103R-II - Experimental Glider
Had a second cockpit fitted where the warhead would normally be. Unpowered glider

Fi 103R-III - Twin-seat Pulse-Jet Flying Bomb
A two seater, powered with a pulsejet.

Fi 103R-IV - Pulse-Jet Flying Bomb
The standard powered operational model. By October 1944 about 175 R-IVs were ready for action.

Fi 103R-V - Twin-seat Pulse-Jet Trainer
Powered trainer for the He.162 (shorter nose)

Fi 104 - Space Rocket Fighter Project (1944)
The Fieseler Fi-104 has been noted as a space fighter, developed from the knowledge gained with the Fi 103. They knew that Germany needed a space fighter if it was to be able to defend its holdings in orbit, and they also knew that it was going to take time to come up with something properly built. General consensus that this was probably work of fiction. See also http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,17115.msg218323.html#msg218323

Fi 156 Storch - STOL Reconnaissance Aircraft (1936)
In 1935, the RLM (Reichsluftfahrtministerium, Reich Aviation Ministry) invited tenders from several companies for a new Luftwaffe aircraft suitable for liaison, army co-operation (today called forward air control), and medical evacuation. This resulted in the Messerschmitt Bf 163 and Siebel Si 201 competing against the Fieseler firm's tender. Conceived by chief designer Reinhold Mewes and technical director Erich Bachem, Fieseler's design had a far better short take off and landing ("STOL") performance. A fixed slat ran along the entire length of the leading edge of the long wings, while a hinged and slotted set of control surfaces ran along the entire length of trailing edge. This was inspired by earlier 1930s Junkers Doppelflügel, "double-wing" aircraft wing control surface design. For the Fi 156, this setup along each wing panel's trailing edge was split nearly 50/50 between the inboard-located flaps and outboard-located ailerons, which themselves included trim tab devices over half of each aileron's trailing edge length.About 2,900 Fi 156s, mostly Cs, were produced from 1937 to 1945 at the Fieseler Factory in Kassel. In 1942, production started in the Morane-Saulnier factory at Puteaux in France. Due to the demand for Fieseler as a subcontractor for building the Bf 109 and the Fw 190, Storch production was shifted to the Leichtbau Budweis in Budweis in 1943.

Fi 156 V1 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1935)
Prototype equipped with an adjustable metal propeller, registration D-IKVN (produced in 1935–1936)

Fi 156 V2 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1936)
Prototype equipped with a Wooden propeller. First Prototype to fly (May 10, 1936). registration D-IDVS (produced in 1935–1936)

Fi 156 V3 - Test Bed Aircraft (1936)
Prototype identical to the V2. Test machine for various radio equipment, registration D-IGLI (produced in 1936)

Fi 156 V4 - Reconnaissance Ski Aircraft (1936)
Prototype identical to the V3. Skis for landing gear and disposable auxiliary tank. (produced in 1936–1937)

Fi 156 V5 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1937)
Production prototype for A-series. (produced in 1937)

Fi 156 A-0 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1937)
Pre-production aircraft, identical to the V3. Ten aircraft were produced. (produced in 1937–1938)

Fi 156 A-1 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1937)
First production models for service, ordered into production by the Luftwaffe with an order for 16 aircraft, the first production aircraft entered service in mid-1937. Some source cite only six were effectively produced. (produced in 1938)

Fi 156 B - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1938)
Fitted with a new system which could retract the normally fixed leading edge slats and had a number of minor aerodynamic cleanups, boosting the speed to 208 km/h (130 mph). The Luftwaffe didn't consider such a small difference to be important and the Fi-156 B was not produced.

Fi 156 C-0 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1939)
Pre-production. Essentially a "flexible" version of the A model. (produced in 1939)

Fi 156 C-1 - Liaison Aircraft (1939)
Three-seater liaison version. (produced in 1939–1940)

Fi 156 C-2 - Observation Aircraft (1940)
Two-seat observation type, which had a raised, fully glazed rear dorsal gun position for mounting a MG 15 machine gun for defense, produced in 1940.

Fi 156 C-3 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1940)
Replaced the C-1 and C-2 with a "universal cockpit" suited for any role. (produced in 1940–1941)

Fi 156 C-3/Trop - Tropical Reconnaissance (1940)
Version adapted for tropical/desert conditions. Filtered intakes. (produced in 1940–1942)

Fi 156 C-5 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1941)
Addition of a belly hardpoint for a camera pod or jettisionable auxiliary tanks. Some were fitted with skis, rather than wheels, for operation on snow. (produced in 1941–1945) See also http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,10919.msg102778.html#msg102778

Fi 156 C-5/Trop - Tropical Reconnaissance (1941)
Version adapted for tropical/desert conditions. Filtered intakes. (produced in 1941–1945).

Fi 156 D-0 - Ambulance Aircraft (1941)
Pre-production version of the air ambulance version of the C model with a larger cockpit and extra rear fuselage-location starboard-side door for stretcher accommodation. Powered by an Argus As 10P engine. (produced in 1941)

Fi 156 D-1 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1942)
Production version of the D-0. (produced in 1942–1945)

Fi 156 E-0 - Liaison Aircraft (1941)
Liaison version identical to the C-1; 10 pre-production aircraft were fitted with tracked landing gear and were produced in 1941–1942.

Fi 156 F - Counter insurgency Aircraft (1942)
Counter insurgency version. Identical to the C-3 with machine guns in side windows and bomb-racks/smoke laying. (produced in 1942)

Fi 156 P - Counter insurgency Aircraft (1942)
Counter insurgency version. Identical to the C-3 with machine guns in side windows and bomb-racks/smoke laying. (produced in 1942)

Fi 156 U - Anti-Submarine Warfare (1940)
Anti-submarine version. Identical to the C-3 with depth charge. (produced in 1940)

Fi 156 K-1 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1940)
Export version of the C-1 (for Sweden).

Fi 157 - Unmanned Anti-aircraft Target Drone (1937)
The Fieseler Fi 157 was an unsuccessful attempt at developing a radio-controlled, full-sized anti-aircraft target drone for training. The Fi 158 was based on work done on this design. Prototypes completed only.

Fi 158 - Research Aircraft (1938)
Developed from Fieseler Fi 157, the Fieseler Fi 158 was a wooden civilian high-speed research aircraft designed and built in Germany. Designed as a manned version of the Fi 157 radio-controlled drone, the Fi 158 was a low-winged monoplane, with retractable tailwheel undercarriage and twin fins and rudders, with the crew sat in tandem in an enclosed cabin. Prortotype only.

Fi 166 - Vertically Launched Jet Fighter (1941)
In the early 1940s, Erich Bachem, Fieseler's Aircraft's technical manager, developed two designs for a rocket-launched fighter that could reach high altitudes quicker than conventional fighters. See http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,10603.0/all.html

Fi 166 Höhenjäger I - Jet Fighter (1941)
Involved a straight-winged jet fighter powered by two Jumo 004 jet engines. It would be launched upright by liquid-fuel rockets. RLM considered this design as impractical.

Fi 166 Höhenjäger II - Jet Fighter (1941)
Erich Bachem undertook a re-design to produce the Fi 166 Höhenjäger II, this time it a two seat rocketplane with a restartable engine. Again the RLM considered this as impractical.

Fi 167 - Ship-borne Torpedo bomber & Reconnaissance (1938)
The Fieseler Fi 167 was a 1930s German biplane torpedo and reconnaissance bomber designed for use from the Graf Zeppelin class aircraft carriers under construction from 1936 to 1942. The aircraft exceeded by far all requirements, had excellent handling capabilities and could carry about twice the required weapons payload. Like the company's better known Fieseler Fi 156 Storch, the Fi 167 had surprising slow-speed capabilities; under the right conditions, the plane would be able to land almost vertically on a moving aircraft carrier. Two prototypes (Fi 167 V1 and V2) were built, followed by twelve pre-production models (Fi 167 A-0) which had only slight modifications from the prototypes.

Fi 168 - Ground-attack (1938)
The Fieseler Fi 168 was a projected German communications and ground attack aircraft designed in 1938 by Frederik Kassel. The two-engine aircraft was a strut-braced high-wing monoplane with two tail-booms and a narrow fuselage pod carried by struts under the centre-section, and was designed to operate in areas featuring rough terrain, and boasted two rigidly mounted forward-facing machine guns. Existed in mock-up form only. See also http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4718.msg229776.html#msg229776 and http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,17115.msg218323.html#msg218323

Fi 169 - Experimental (1938)
The Fi 169 was allocated by the RLM the code 8-169, but no details found, possibly not used.

Fi 203 - Manned pulse jet
Twin hulled Fi-103 development, probably a fictional design.

Fi 253 Spatz - Sports Aircraft (1939)
A light civilian aircraft, only six units were produced, however, due to the Second World War. Had may features of the Storch aircraft.

Fi 256 - Reconnaissance Aircraft (1943)
A five seat civil version of the Fi 156 design; two were built by Morane-Saulnier.

Fi 333 - Large Transport
The Fieseler Fi 333 was a prototype transport aircraft developed by Fieseler, and backed by the Luftwaffe. The aircraft was to utilise detachable pods of varying sizes to carry cargo, a system that would allow a rapid turnaround on the ground. The very tall braced undercarriage was made unretractable so that the fuselage would be able to take the strain of the heavy cargo. Three prototypes were built, but without the distinctive undercarriage.
The Storch was also license produced as the

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-500 - Liaison Aircraft
Liaison version. French produced with 240 hp French built Argus engine.

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-501 - Reconnaissance Aircraft
With a 233 hp Renault 6Q engine

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-502 - Reconnaissance Aircraft
Liaison version. Identical to the MS-500, with the Argus engine replaced by a 230 hp Salmson 9ab radial

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-504 - Reconnaissance Aircraft
Fitted with a 304 hp Jacobs R-755-A2 radial engine.

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-505 - Reconnaissance Aircraft
Observation version of the MS-500 with the Argus engine replaced by a 304 hp Jacobs R-755-A2 radial engine.

• License-built Morane-Saulnier MS-506 - Reconnaissance Aircraft
Fitted with a 235 hp Lycoming engine.

• License-built Mráz K-65 Čáp - Reconnaissance Aircraft
Production in Czechoslovakia after World War II.

Antonov OKA-38 Aist - Reconnaissance Aircraft
An unlicensed Soviet copy of the Fi 156, powered by a copy of a Renault MV-6 inverted, air-cooled straight-6 engine, was starting production as the factory was overrun by German forces in 1941

The later Slepcev Storch and Pazmany PL-9 Stork also follow Fi 156 principals in their design.

Sources:

http://www.luftarchiv.de/index.htm?/flugzeuge/fieseler/fi3.htm
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fieseler
http://www.fantastic-plastic.com/FieselerFi166CatalogPage.htm
http://www.histaviation.com/Fieseler_Fi_157_and_Fi_158.html

Karnas, Dariusz and Pawel Przymusiala. Fi 156 Storch Vol.1 (Militaria n.68). Warsaw: Wydawnictwo, 1998. ISBN 83-7219-019-4.
Karnas, Dariusz and Pawel Przymusiala. Fi 156 Storch Vol.2 (Militaria n.100) Warsaw: Wydawnictwo, 1999. ISBN 83-7219-059-3.
Kay, Antony L.; J. Richard Smith; Eddie J. Creek (2002). German Aircraft of the Second World War. Putnam.
Bateson, Richard. Fieseler Fi 156 Storch Aircraft Profile No. 228. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1971. ASIN: B000J443X2.
Heinz J. Nowarra: Die deutsche Luftrüstung 1933–1945. Bernard & Graefe, Koblenz 1993, ISBN 3-7637-5464-4
Manfred Griehl: Deutsche Flugzeugbewaffnung bis 1945 (German Aircraft Armament until 1945)
Green, William. Warplanes of the Third Reich. New York: Doubleday, 1972. ISBN 0-385-05782-2.
Gerhard Fieseler: Meine Bahn am Himmel. Der Erbauer des Fieseler Storch und der V 1 erzählt sein Leben. Bertelsmann Verlag, München 1979, ISBN 3-570-01192-5
Flugzeug 2/1990
Jet & Prop Magazine 1/92
Luftfahrt History Heft 13
Flying Revue International #65 July 1969
 

Stargazer2006

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Jemiba

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Many thanks for this compilation !
I would like to add information about the Fi 256. A good article written by Karl Kössler, based on
more comprehensive information can be found here
http://www.adl-luftfahrthistorik.de/dok/Fieseler_Fi256.pdf .
It's in German only, I'll just quote his comments with regards to some statements in
many other sources, repeating errors, or at least giving suppositions as hard facts:
- The stated pure civil character is at least uncertain, if not unprobable given the time
of its development, more probable is an intended "dual use".
- Production of prototypes by Morane Saulnier is not proven and probably deduced by the fact,
that this company was engaged in manufacturing the Fi 156.
- The number of just two prototypes is stated to be wrong in that article, as documents like
flight reports and logbooks are mentioning at least 8, probably 12 aircraft and even more seem
more probable.

Nevertheless, thanks again for your effort ! ;)
 

Jemiba

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hesham

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Jemiba said:
I have the feeling, that all links mentioning the "Fi 356" just going around in a circuit.
I've found no information about this project, or a source and I'm not sure, if this isn't
just as fictional, as the Fi 203.



Impossible my dear Jemiba,


The Fieseler Fi.356 is real design,here is a paragraph from the book;
German Aircraft of the Second World War,Putnam.
 

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Jemiba

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hesham said:
Impossible my dear Jemiba,


The Fieseler Fi.356 is real design,here is a paragraph from the book;
German Aircraft of the Second World War,Putnam.

Again, careful with such designations, please !
A prove for the "Fi 356" having been really a project by the "Fieseler Flugzeugwerke Kassel"
would be a document mentioning it as a Fieseler design. But there's NO in the Putnam book.
If you have a look into the designations list made by Andreas Parsch, you'll find, that the
number 8-356 is "8-356 is associated both with a Fieseler project (based on Fi 156) and a
Junkers project (no details)" and in this list, it is printed in gray, which, according to the
key means, that "numbers, which were either allocated to unknown projects or never used
at all, are shown in gray". Principally the German system allocated numbers in steps of 100
to developments of the basic aircraft, as for the Bf/Me 109 - Me 209 - Me 309, or Ju 88 -
Ju 188 - Ju 288 - Ju 388 (although the Ju 288 hardly was related to the Ju 88), but there
were exceptions from that rule. And such numbers seem to have been kept clear, if there
was the possibilty of a development. But that doen't necessarily mean, that such a design
was actually started ! The Fi 256 was just in the state of prototype/pre-production testing
at the end of the war, so the number "356" may well have been allocated to Junkers.

So, please, no such statements, it's not useful to cement such things without any real evidence !
 

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OK my dear Jemiba,


we must search about more evidences about the existing of this designation,but why
they insisted on number 356 allocated to Fieseler,even in the book; German Aircraft
Industry and Production 1933-1945,Airlife.


And in my files,the Junkers 356 may be developed from Fieseler Fi.156,but of course
I am not sure,so I will check.
 

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hesham

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Hi,


the RLM number 356 was released to Junkers as a development of Fieseler Fi.156;


http://www.geocities.ws/hjunkers/ju_ju356_a1.htm


Ju356 was reserved for a further developement of the Fieseler Fi156 Storch.
It seems, as if this further developement should have been transfered from Fieseler to Junkers.
However, before any design studies were started, this project was cancelled.
 

Jemiba

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Good find ! If correct, it makes clear, that there was no such project.
 

hesham

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hesham said:
How we forget the Fieseler "P" series;

P.19 & P.22 were a carrier based twin engine aircraft projects.
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4771.0.html

P.35 was initial design for Fi.103.

To complete;

P.29 was a military transport Project,intended to compete Arado Ar.232,led to develop Fi.333
P.30 was an unconventional military transport Project,later became Fi.333

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fieseler_Fi_333
 

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Please find attached an interesting entry in "Morane-Saulnier Ses Avions, Ses Projets" by H Lacaze, one of the excellent books on French aircraft companies published by Lela Presse. It states that although Morane-Saulnier intended to build the Fieseler 256 and, it seems, 2 pattern aircraft were sent to them, no aircraft were completed. It also states that 6 prototypes & 5 A0 series aircraft were built in Germany.
 

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