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Space-X DRAGON (manned/unmanned) capsule.

Tuna

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This is something that will have to be dealt with, because sooner or later people will be truly living in space. And people will want their pets with them. What pets work in zero-g? Dogs seem wholly wrong... even if they can adjust psychologically, they're just physically unable to deal with zero-g. Same with goats, sheep, pigs. They'd just bounce sadly. Monkeys on the other hand should be able to get around as effectively as humans, if not more so. Cats? I expect (or perhaps "hope") that they'd finally get over the "falling freakout." And if the inside of the capsule or hab is covered in something akin to burlap, kittyclaws should be able to hook in and allow them to hold on and maneuver.
When we will live and work in space, it won't be in zero-g. There are too many physiological problems. The pets will just have to adapt to spin gravity.
It already blew up last week end. I wonder if space launch will ever get to the point of being able to fly in anything but a clear sky. Imagine if the airlines shut down every time there was rain or wind.
F9 is particularly sensitive to weather because it has a too high fineness ratio. This makes wind shear a problem, because the rocket is not very strong against transverse loads, and as it's so long, when it crosses layers of different wind the shear can cause excessive loads.

This is a result of infrastructure limitations: F9 rockets are built in Hawthorne, California, and are then trucked across the country to their texas testing facility, and from there to the launchpad. The diameter of the rocket is exactly as large as it can be and still make that road transport. The original F9 was designed to be a reasonably proportioned rocket at that diameter, but as SpaceX refined the engines to be more powerful, they kept lengthening the rocket until it's now far too tall and narrow for it's own good.

Starship/SH sheds this limitation as they have given up on road transport of finished rockets, and are planning all their production facilities at either the launchpad or at ports. The current Starship/Super Heavy design should be able to take off any basically any weather where any airliner can, and given how they are not married to a specific diameter anymore, there's no reason they would sacrifice this capability.
 
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sferrin

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This is something that will have to be dealt with, because sooner or later people will be truly living in space. And people will want their pets with them. What pets work in zero-g? Dogs seem wholly wrong... even if they can adjust psychologically, they're just physically unable to deal with zero-g. Same with goats, sheep, pigs. They'd just bounce sadly. Monkeys on the other hand should be able to get around as effectively as humans, if not more so. Cats? I expect (or perhaps "hope") that they'd finally get over the "falling freakout." And if the inside of the capsule or hab is covered in something akin to burlap, kittyclaws should be able to hook in and allow them to hold on and maneuver.
When we will live and work in space, it won't be in zero-g. There are too many physiological problems. The pets will just have to adapt to spin gravity.
It already blew up last week end. I wonder if space launch will ever get to the point of being able to fly in anything but a clear sky. Imagine if the airlines shut down every time there was rain or wind.
F9 is particularly sensitive to weather because it has a too high fineness ratio. This makes wind shear a problem, because the rocket is not very strong against transverse loads, and as it's so long, when it crosses layers of different wind the shear can cause excessive loads.

This is a result of infrastructure limitations: F9 rockets are built in Hawthorne, California, and are then trucked across the country to their texas testing facility, and from there to the launchpad. The diameter of the rocket is exactly as large as it can be and still make that road transport. The original F9 was designed to be a reasonably proportioned rocket at that diameter, but as SpaceX refined the engines to be more powerful, they kept lengthening the rocket until it's now far too tall and narrow for it's own good.

Starship/SH sheds this limitation as they have given up on road transport of finished rockets, and are planning all their production facilities at either the launchpad or at ports. The current Starship/Super Heavy design should be able to take off any basically any weather where any airliner can, and given how they are not married to a specific diameter anymore, there's no reason they would sacrifice this capability.

One would think the need to be trucked, on it's side, across country would mean it would be LESS susceptible to transverse loads than a rocket that goes by barge.
 

galgot

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sferrin

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(that smiley color, veering on tangerine, is very convenient... :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: Somebody should make a variant of it with a weird, blond and bouffant hairdo...)
View attachment 634223
To take with full glass of bleach.
Please tell me you don't actually believe he said that.
:) Please , tell me you don't actually believe whats written on that box...
Other than TDS being an actual thing, nah.
 

uk 75

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Wow! At a time when so much bad stuff is happening this is much needed good news.
Nice that they named the ship after a British cop show (sorry couldnt resist).
Hope all goes well for the rest of the journey.
 

FighterJock

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Wow! At a time when so much bad stuff is happening this is much needed good news.
Nice that they named the ship after a British cop show (sorry couldnt resist).
Hope all goes well for the rest of the journey.
Same here uk 75, let's hope the re-entry and splash down goes just as smooth as the first part of the mission.
 

TomcatViP

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Great day for us all. A private company safely bringing people into space is really a sign that space is open for all.
Nasa Chief wasn't wrong when he said that today (aborted launch day) was all about inspiring the next Elon's.
 

Orionblamblam

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When we will live and work in space, it won't be in zero-g. There are too many physiological problems. The pets will just have to adapt to spin gravity.
While that's all true, and Odin willing the United States will *finally* *at* long* *freakin'* *last* get off it's ass and launch some *real* space stations, the fact is that even in a mature space faring civilization zero-g will still be a thing. Unless grav plating straight out of Star Wars/Trek comes to be, "gravity" will come form rotation. Which means that at the space station core "gravity" will be arbitrarily low. Additionally, spacecraft will spend non-trival periods in zero g. So you'll have critters along the centerlines of stations, and critters in spacecraft that might spend hours, days, weeks, months drifting between destinations.
 

GTX

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(that smiley color, veering on tangerine, is very convenient... :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: Somebody should make a variant of it with a weird, blond and bouffant hairdo...)
View attachment 634223
To take with full glass of bleach.
Please tell me you don't actually believe he said that.

He did say "And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in one minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning, because you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs"


But why would he need to bother when he told everyone it would be gone by April. Or perhaps we should listen to Eric Trump who said recently COVID-19 will 'Magically' disappear after election day. Of course 370,000 (including 105,000 Americans) dead people worldwide (as of today) and growing might disagree with that...
 

The Artist

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Note the zero-g indicator:



Someday someone will launch a fur coated razorblade into orbit. This will either be one of the crowning achievements in human history, or a blood-soaked disaster. In either event, there'd better be several live-feed camera angles.

Why a dinosaur? With the first flight of a spacecraft class called Dragon, I'd have brought a dragon.
 

Richard N

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The dino is one of the astronaut's kid's toys. They rounded up their favorites and picked one to go with their dads.

The manufacturer must be very pleased. Advertising money couldn't buy. Kind of like the Teslas that took them to the pad.
 

FighterJock

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The dino is one of the astronaut's kid's toys. They rounded up their favorites and picked one to go with their dads.

The manufacturer must be very pleased. Advertising money couldn't buy. Kind of like the Teslas that took them to the pad.
I thought that was a nice thing to do when I heard it during Saturday’s live feed during the launch, getting the next generation interested in spaceflight is the key thing to do these day’s.
 

Flyaway

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NASA HQ PHOTO
SpaceX Demo-2 Launch (NHQ202005300113)

Hans Koenigsmann, vice president for build and flight reliability at SpaceX hugs Kathy Lueders, manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program, following the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft on the Demo-2 mission with NASA astronauts Douglas Hurley and Robert Behnken onboard, Saturday, May 30, 2020, in firing room four of the Launch Control Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission is the first launch with astronauts of the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program. The test flight serves as an end-to-end demonstration of SpaceX’s crew transportation system. Behnken and Hurley launched at 3:22 p.m. EDT on Saturday, May 30, from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. A new era of human spaceflight is set to begin as American astronauts once again launch on an American rocket from American soil to low-Earth orbit for the first time since the conclusion of the Space Shuttle Program in 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

https://flic.kr/p/2j7uYgk
 

RanulfC

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As an aside my wife was (prior to the launch) watching the World of Warcraft Arena Championships and there were major complaints about the 'low' attendance... till she pointed out what was going on OUTSIDE the game and attendence suddenly dropped even more :)

Randy
 

FighterJock

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Some very big / interesting news; NASA has modified the SpaceX commercial crew program contract to allow reuse of both Falcon 9s and Crew Dragons in future manned missions, beginning with PCM-2 (the third manned Crew Dragon mission, including DM-2).
That is certainly interesting news Dragon029, hopefully that will mean that the cost of launching astronauts to the ISS will come down in the future.
 

Flyaway

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The wording I saw previously by someone to describe it would be that NASA would use ‘gently used’ first stages. Whatever that means in context
 

FighterJock

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The wording I saw previously by someone to describe it would be that NASA would use ‘gently used’ first stages. Whatever that means in context
I think that probably means that there has to be no damage or hard landings onto the drone ships by the Falcon 9.
 

Flyaway

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The wording I saw previously by someone to describe it would be that NASA would use ‘gently used’ first stages. Whatever that means in context
I think that probably means that there has to be no damage or hard landings onto the drone ships by the Falcon 9.
Do you think that it would discount first stages that had been used on ‘high energy’ launches?
 

FighterJock

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That would be good news for us budding astronauts, that would mean more ways of getting into space instead of relying on Virgin Galactic, and hopefully mean that the price would come down eventually.
 

TomcatViP

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Bowersox, though, said the cost savings that both commercial crew and cargo vehicles provide compared to the shuttle, on a per-seat or per-kilogram basis, aren’t as big as expected. “It’s kind of surprising. We did lower the costs, but we didn’t lower it as much as we were hoping,” he said. “People were hoping for a factor of 10 reduction in costs, right? And we’re just not there. I’d say it’s probably more like 20% to 40%.”

However, he said the commercial vehicles, because they are smaller than the shuttle, are significantly less expensive to operate on a per-flight basis. “If you have more commercial participation, costs can come down more,” he said. “I think there’s tremendous promise. I think we’re on a good path.”
Interesting. I also wonder what are the rates range and conditions for SpaceX astronauts. It's an important aspect of any commercial endeavor.
 
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TomS

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Mission likely to last until August.

That is news to me, I wonder why the mission got an extension?
It's not really a new extension, this is the duration planned when they launched. They just confirmed that it looks possible.

They did extend the planned mission from a few days to a couple of months several months before launch because they wanted to reduce the window where there is only a single Soyuz crew on board. Extra hands means they can get past maintenance and actually do some science.
 
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Flyaway

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