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Perseverance Rover

DrRansom

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Does anybody have a report as to how well Perserverance's terrain relative navigation system worked?
 

Flyaway

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TomcatViP

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French President laser blasts Martian rocks

. Le Président a écouté une présentation de la mission. Devant lui, des écrans et plusieurs horloges. L’une indique l’heure à Toulouse, Los Alamos et Pasadena. Image amusante : sur le mur du fond, une photo du sol de Mars a été placardée sur toute la surface. Le Président, seul devant, semble alors se tenir sur la planète rouge. Puis il a été invité à s’asseoir. Les scientifiques toulousains, qui se partagent le pilotage de SuperCam avec les Américains, par tranches horaires, avaient une séquence de tirs au laser à l’ordre du jour. Ces tirs permettent d’analyser les roches prélevées. Et c’est Emmanuel Macron qui est convié à déclencher une séquence de trente tirs. L’opération, comme la guerre des étoiles (lire ci-dessus), n’est guère spectaculaire et se règle en deux clics de souris sur un écran d’ordinateur avec l’aide d’un opérateur. Chaque cible identifiée sur le sol de Mars a reçu un nom de baptême en langue navajo. Quinze minutes sont nécessaires avant que l’action soit effectuée. A sa sortie, Emmanuel Macron a reçu un cadeau du CNES : une des premières photos de Mars prise par SuperCam.
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. The President listened to a presentation of the mission. In front of him, screens and several clocks. One shows the time in Toulouse, Los Alamos and Pasadena. Funny image: on the back wall, a photo of the ground of Mars has been plastered over the entire surface. The President, alone in front, seems to be standing on the red planet. Then he was invited to sit down. Toulouse scientists, who share the piloting of SuperCam with the Americans, in time slots, had a sequence of laser shots on the agenda. These shots allow analysis of the rocks collected. And it is Emmanuel Macron who is invited to unleash a sequence of thirty shots. The operation, like Star Wars (read above), is hardly spectacular and can be done with two mouse clicks on a computer screen with the assistance of an operator. Each identified target on the soil of Mars was given a baptismal name in the Navajo language. Fifteen minutes are required before the action is taken. Upon his release, Emmanuel Macron received a gift from CNES: one of the first photos of Mars taken by SuperCam.

Obviously, now we know that man should read Mars attacked:

MV5BNThlMjBmOWItNjljZi00ZGU4LWJkZjgtNWU1ZjI1MTg4MzczXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNTIzOTk5ODM@._V1_.jpg
 

Flyaway

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View: https://twitter.com/nasajpl/status/1372264729352105984


Teams for @NASAPersevere & Ingenuity have chosen a flight zone where the #MarsHelicopter will attempt the first-ever powered flight on another planet!

Join us to discuss next steps for Ingenuity. March 23 at 10:30am PT (1:30pm ET/1700 UTC) go.nasa.gov/38QwpmY. Reply with Qs


NASA to Host Briefing to Preview First Mars Helicopter Flights
Mar 17, 2021

Members of the projects will lay out the steps necessary before the helicopter attempts its historic test flights.

NASA will hold a virtual media briefing at 1:30 p.m. EDT (10:30 a.m. PDT) Tuesday, March 23, to discuss upcoming activities for the agency’s Ingenuity Mars helicopter. The teams operating Ingenuity and NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover have chosen the flight zone where the helicopter will attempt the first powered, controlled flights on another planet.

The briefing will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website and will livestream on multiple agency social media platforms, including the YouTube and Facebook channels for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California.

Briefing participants include:

Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, NASA Headquarters
Bobby Braun, director for planetary science, JPL
J. (Bob) Balaram, Ingenuity chief engineer, JPL
Håvard Grip, Ingenuity chief pilot, JPL
Farah Alibay, Perseverance integration lead for Ingenuity, JPL

Members of the media and the public also may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #MarsHelicopter.

Ingenuity’s test flights are expected to begin no earlier than the first week of April. The exact timing of the first flight will remain fluid as engineers work out details on the timeline for deployments and vehicle positioning of Perseverance and Ingenuity. Photos showing some of the progress are available on Perseverance’s raw images website.

Perseverance – with Ingenuity attached to its belly – landed in Jezero Crater Feb. 18. Ingenuity is a technology demonstration with a limited test flight duration of up to 31 days (30 Mars days, or sols). The rover will deploy the helicopter and provide environmental monitoring and imaging support. It also hosts Ingenuity’s base station, enabling communication with mission controllers on Earth.

An Ingenuity press kit, with more information about the helicopter, is available at:


More information is also available on the Ingenuity website:


To learn more about Perseverance, visit:


and

 

Flyaway

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This podcast has info on the Ingenuity helicopter and why it needs to deployed so soon in the mission. Being on the underside of the rover it reduces ground clearance.

 

FighterJock

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Lets hope that Ingenuity succeeds, nine feet does not sound like much, but NASA are obviously going to play it safely with the helicopter. I do not want to see Ingenuity crash on the first attempt at flying on Mars.
 

sferrin

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Two frames? And sub-AM, quality audio up the page? Is it just transmission time or what? Anybody know what the bitrate for Mars to Earth is?
 

Hobbes

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I think it also varies by the camera uses as I don’t believe they are all equal so to speak.

- 2 Mbit/s is the maximum and is only achieved when the relay satellite is overhead, which is one pass per day
- Transmission rate does not vary by camera. Camera resolution does vary, and they have the option to send thumbnails instead of the whole image (so the ground team can decide which images are interesting enough to be sent in high res).




An orbiter passes over the rover and is in the vicinity of the sky to communicate with the rover for about eight minutes at a time, per sol. In that time, between 100 and 250 megabits of data can be transmitted to an orbiter.
 

Flyaway

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FighterJock

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Hobbes

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The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
 

sferrin

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The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.
 

FighterJock

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The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.

I thought that Ingenuity would have some sort of video camera onboard to take pictures and video when it was flying? I think that is an opportunity missed.
 

Hobbes

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The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.

Yes, video will get queued along with the other data.
The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.

I thought that Ingenuity would have some sort of video camera onboard to take pictures and video when it was flying? I think that is an opportunity missed.
What makes you think there won't be?

A 0.5-megapixel navigation camera on Ingenuity’s underside will be snapping 30 photos per second of the ground to inform its movement.


Ingenuity has another, more powerful camera with 13 megapixels facing the horizon. That will snap pictures in midair, while cameras aboard Perseverance will aim to capture the helicopter in flight. All of those pictures will eventually be transmitted back to Earth.

 

sferrin

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The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.

Yes, video will get queued along with the other data.
The usual MO:
1. download low-res images quickly
2. choose which images they want in higher quality and put them in a queue for later download.

So I'd expect high-res images to show up in a few days, same as with the landing.
How about video with sound? I thought that was the whole point of the sensor suite? If it gets trickled out over a month, so it doesn't interfere with other stuff, so be it.

I thought that Ingenuity would have some sort of video camera onboard to take pictures and video when it was flying? I think that is an opportunity missed.
What makes you think there won't be?

No video yet (of anything, a 2-frame repeated slide-show is not a video) and sub-AM quality "sound" so far.
 

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