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Japanese Secret Projects:Experimental Aircraft of the IJA & IJN 1939-1945

ninjrk

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Amazon US finally shipped mine and I've happily been reading. Very well done and I really like the 3-views. As a modeler, these are mush more useful than perspective drawings and I think give a better idea of how the plane looked. My only minor criticism is that, even though I have lots of the Luft 1946 and tech manuals they seem a little out of place here.

Overall very well done and enjoyable.

Matt
 

eltf177

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My copy arrived yesterday. Only had a chance to skim it but it's quite impressive!
 

blackkite

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I got my copy today and I agree 100% with Robin's post,too.
It's very gorgeous, beautiful and impressive. I am very happy.
Thank you very much Ed! :D
 

Pelzig

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Thank you for the compliment on the book! Though, to clarify, I only say that the J8M1 designation has never been verified in Japanese sources even though it appears from time to time in English sources. Kitsuka is the actual name of the aircraft, which is why I use it in the book. Kikka is the phonetic spelling of Kitsuka as used postwar in reports. Neither is wrong but I preferred to use Kitsuka.

Cheers,

Ed

airman said:
So by this book you will learn that right designation of Nakajima Kikka is Nakajima J8N1 Kitsuka .......mhhh..... :-\.... Kikka was cool ! :)
 

Pelzig

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Actually, there may very well be a second volume. I've drawn up a proposal for a second book which will cover between 40 to 45 aircraft. If it finds favor, it may see a release date of late 2012.

Sales have been very good for the first book and I thank you all for your support as this will likely pave the way for approval of the second book.

Cheers,

Ed


Hoo-2b-2day said:
This book left me with a feeling that could be summarised by quoting Charles Dickens "Please Sir, I want some more". Any chance of a Volume 2? It would be an automatic inclusion on my to buy it list.

Great book, fully recommended to those considering buying it.
 

Pelzig

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Greetings, Matt:

Originally, when the book was first proposed, it was suggested that a section be included on comics (specifically, manga) which featured Japanese x-planes. For example, Seiho Takizawa's "Who Fighter" manga which featured the Ki-83 (which, incidentally, has been translated and sold through Dark Horse Manga). Obviously, the most prominent U.S. comic artist that used Japanese x-planes was Ted Nomura. As with any plan, they don't survive first contact. To research both the scope of Japanese military manga along with the actual aircraft for the book, in the time available, would not have worked. So, one had to give and the manga section was scrapped. However, this was not before Mr. Nomura graciously allowed his work to be used in the book. Some of his profile work was relevant to the technical exchange section and the remainder were included in the section at the back of the book as another bit of "what-if" and as a legacy to the manga section which never materialized.

Cheers,

Ed


ninjrk said:
Amazon US finally shipped mine and I've happily been reading. Very well done and I really like the 3-views. As a modeler, these are mush more useful than perspective drawings and I think give a better idea of how the plane looked. My only minor criticism is that, even though I have lots of the Luft 1946 and tech manuals they seem a little out of place here.

Overall very well done and enjoyable.

Matt
 

blackkite

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Pelzig said:
Actually, there may very well be a second volume. I've drawn up a proposal for a second book which will cover between 40 to 45 aircraft. If it finds favor, it may see a release date of late 2012.

Sales have been very good for the first book and I thank you all for your support as this will likely pave the way for approval of the second book.

Cheers,

Ed
Wow It's great news for me!! I can't wait until 2012.
 

airman

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blackkite said:
Pelzig said:
Actually, there may very well be a second volume. I've drawn up a proposal for a second book which will cover between 40 to 45 aircraft. If it finds favor, it may see a release date of late 2012.

Sales have been very good for the first book and I thank you all for your support as this will likely pave the way for approval of the second book.

Cheers,

Ed
Wow It's great news for me!! I can't wait until 2012.
2012 ?
But .... @ end of world ! !!! ;D ;D ;D
i am joking ;) ,
news of second volume it's good news ! :p
Pelzig can you tell us more about this 40-45 type of aircraft ?
 

ninjrk

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Pelzig said:
Greetings, Matt:

Originally, when the book was first proposed, it was suggested that a section be included on comics (specifically, manga) which featured Japanese x-planes. For example, Seiho Takizawa's "Who Fighter" manga which featured the Ki-83 (which, incidentally, has been translated and sold through Dark Horse Manga). Obviously, the most prominent U.S. comic artist that used Japanese x-planes was Ted Nomura. As with any plan, they don't survive first contact. To research both the scope of Japanese military manga along with the actual aircraft for the book, in the time available, would not have worked. So, one had to give and the manga section was scrapped. However, this was not before Mr. Nomura graciously allowed his work to be used in the book. Some of his profile work was relevant to the technical exchange section and the remainder were included in the section at the back of the book as another bit of "what-if" and as a legacy to the manga section which never materialized.

Cheers,

Ed
Seems fair. i will say I very much hope the 3-view rendering style used in this book becomes standard for the various Secret Projects books moving forward. Much more attractive and useful than the old off-center paintings. From a modeler's perspective, this is vastly more useful.

I'm curious, is there any information on Japanese air to air missiles that wasn't included?

Matt

Matt
 

sagallacci

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I just got a copy and found it awfully slight. I would have much preferred some original drawings instead of the fakey looking computer art.
 

Pelzig

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Greetings, Steve:

I regret to hear of your disappointment with the book in so far as how I elected to illustrate it. Several factors came into play on this aspect of the publication. Firstly, obtaining original photographs (let alone actual copies of original blueprints and technical drawings) is not a inexpensive affair. Although photographs taken by official U.S. government agencies (which, in WW2, included the Signal Corps) is public domain (and in Japan, any photos before 1953 is considered public domain), one cannot simply copy from other books or sources, even if the photographs are public domain. To do so is violation of copyright law, as strange as it may sound. Thus, I would have to go to, for example, the U.S. National Archives to purchase prints to use in the book. The cost is based on the print run of the book. The more copies of the book printed, the more the cost is. This made using original photographs very cost prohibitive. In addition, the publisher requires documented proof for any photograph used to both verify the ability to publish the photograph as well as permission to do so. This, of course, entails that whomever the photograph was obtained from can verify and document where they got it from. In the end, it is a rather time consuming and expensive process but understandable to avoid any litigation.

Line art was considered (and in fact, when I first started this project, I contacted you about hiring your talent to do line art drawings but to no avail sadly) but ruled out since, in all honestly, line art is readily available in other sources and online through the internet. It was felt that having original artwork was not only in keeping in line with other publications in Midland's secret project books (notably the German x-plane series) but gave the readers something fresh, vivid, and still worthwhile in terms of profiles and unit markings and colors which benefit modelers and those interested in unit heraldry. It was also the more cost effective means to illustrate the book with the budget available.

I understood going in that the finalized choice for illustrating the book may not please all but understand a lot goes on behind the scenes in bringing a book to life and concessions sometimes have to be made.

I can say that my forthcoming book on Italian x-planes, co-authored with Skybolt, will be far more photographs and drawings which should please those who crave that sort of book illustrating.

Cheers,

Ed

sagallacci said:
I just got a copy and found it awfully slight. I would have much preferred some original drawings instead of the fakey looking computer art.
 

Pelzig

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;D The Mayans may disagree with all the 2012 doom and gloom. ;D

At any rate, the tentative aircraft slated for the companion volume are:

Imperial Japanese Army Air Force:

Tachikawa Ki-104 fighter
Kawasaki Ki-48-II Kai and Ki-174 suicide light bomber
Nakajima Ki-117 high altitude fighter
Kawasaki Ki-119 light bomber
Kayaba Ka-1/Ka-2 autogyro
Kobeseiko Te-Go army cooperation plane
Kawanishi Ki-85 heavy bomber
Nakajima Ki-86 heavy bomber
Mitsubishi Ki-90 heavy bomber
Mitsubishi Ki-95/Ki-103 reece plane/escort fighter
Mitsubishi Ki-109 heavy interceptor
Kawasaki Ki-108 high altitude, twin-engine fighter
Mitsubishi Ki-167 suicide bomber
TB strategic long range bomber
Ku-17 glider
Mitsubishi Ki-97/Ki-112 escort/heavy fighters

Imperial Japanese Navy Air Force:

Hitachi "He-Type" heavy bomber
Aichi S1A Denko night fighter
Mitsubishi Q2M1 ASW bomber
Kawanishi G9K Gunzan bomber
Mitsubishi Rifuku carrier fighter
Kawanishi K-100 bomber
Aichi B8A Mokusei torpedo bomber
Kyushu Q3W1 Nankai ASW aircraft
Kawanishi K-60 flying boat
Nakajima G8M Renzen four-engine bomber
Yokosuka D5Y1 Myojo Kai suicide aircraft
Mitsubishi G6M1 Wingtip Convoy Fighter
Kawanishi K-120 flying boat
Yokosuka MXY4 radio-controlled target
Hiro H7Y1 flying boat

Pre-War:

IJA:

Koshiki A-3 long range recce aircraft (1924)
Gasuden Koken long range research aircraft (1937)
Mitsubishi Ki-20 four-engine bomber (1931-1935)

IJN:

Mitsubishi 1MT1N torpedo carrier (1922-1923)
Mitsubishi 2MR1 Tobi reece aircraft (1927)
Nakajima B3N1 carrier attack bomber (1933)

Like the first book, this is subject to change as there were some last minute additions to the first book and I've no doubt this will be the case with this one along with other data on missiles, weapons, etc.

Cheers,

Ed

airman said:
2012 ?
But .... @ end of world ! !!! ;D ;D ;D
i am joking ;) ,
news of second volume it's good news ! :p
Pelzig can you tell us more about this 40-45 type of aircraft ?
 

blackkite

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Wow Yokosuka H7Y1, Kawanishi K-100 and Gunzan!!
 

lark

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Some sources state there's 200 year error in the interpretations
of the Maya calendar , so we have all the time to
enjoy this mouthwatering collection ;)
 

Skyraider3D

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lark said:
Some sources state there's 200 year error in the interpretations
of the Maya calendar , so we have all the time to
enjoy this mouthwatering collection ;)
That depends which way the error works... :)
Given infinite parallel dimensions, we should be lucky to be in one where it gets released and "2012" happens 200 years later! ;D
But who knows... CERN may have big plans for 2012 too ::) Funny how they seem to be busy convincing themselves everything will be fine with their experiments, here: http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHc/Safety-en.html
I wasn't worried before, but now I wonder if I should be! How long does it take for a black hole in Switzerland to absorb Surrey, UK? ;)
 

ninjrk

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Rather late as a reply, I realize but I wanted to chime in that I think the CG art was one of the best parts of the book, actually. Line drawings tend to be quite undetailed and don't visually illustrate the curves very well. CG art, when rendered without perspective distortion, gives you the same information as a line drawing but frankly more attractive and more detailed. Throw in that you can then use those models for replicated flight scenes and I would be perfectly happy if line art wen the way of the dodo in these books. Perhaps more importantly, when I show people my Secret Projects library they've been very complimetary of the Cg art and two people went off and bought the Japanese projects book specifically for the art. Renders are just more visually attractive than B&W line art to the non-obsessed amongst us!

Matt

Pelzig said:
Greetings, Steve:

I regret to hear of your disappointment with the book in so far as how I elected to illustrate it. Several factors came into play on this aspect of the publication. Firstly, obtaining original photographs (let alone actual copies of original blueprints and technical drawings) is not a inexpensive affair. Although photographs taken by official U.S. government agencies (which, in WW2, included the Signal Corps) is public domain (and in Japan, any photos before 1953 is considered public domain), one cannot simply copy from other books or sources, even if the photographs are public domain. To do so is violation of copyright law, as strange as it may sound. Thus, I would have to go to, for example, the U.S. National Archives to purchase prints to use in the book. The cost is based on the print run of the book. The more copies of the book printed, the more the cost is. This made using original photographs very cost prohibitive. In addition, the publisher requires documented proof for any photograph used to both verify the ability to publish the photograph as well as permission to do so. This, of course, entails that whomever the photograph was obtained from can verify and document where they got it from. In the end, it is a rather time consuming and expensive process but understandable to avoid any litigation.

Line art was considered (and in fact, when I first started this project, I contacted you about hiring your talent to do line art drawings but to no avail sadly) but ruled out since, in all honestly, line art is readily available in other sources and online through the internet. It was felt that having original artwork was not only in keeping in line with other publications in Midland's secret project books (notably the German x-plane series) but gave the readers something fresh, vivid, and still worthwhile in terms of profiles and unit markings and colors which benefit modelers and those interested in unit heraldry. It was also the more cost effective means to illustrate the book with the budget available.

I understood going in that the finalized choice for illustrating the book may not please all but understand a lot goes on behind the scenes in bringing a book to life and concessions sometimes have to be made.

I can say that my forthcoming book on Italian x-planes, co-authored with Skybolt, will be far more photographs and drawings which should please those who crave that sort of book illustrating.

Cheers,

Ed
 

theponja

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Finally I was able to buy the book and it arrived last week to my home. :) :)

Buy books from Argentina is very expensive and I've to pay nearly the 70% of book in Shipping so I try to choose very carefully the books.

I'm happy to say the books delivers what I wanted: A lot of information about unknown Japanese projects. I like the style of book and It's great the inclusion of "fantasy" planes like the Suzukase 20 or the Kamikaze Airplane.

But I've to say I'm somewhat disappointed with some of CG work in the book. I'm a fan of CG and I frequent visitor of sites like www.military-meshes.com and the sub forum for CGI in this site. I'm understand perfectly how great is the treatment of light and shadows in pictures like this one:



but the exaggeration of lights and shadows in profiles get makes them near unusable to modeling or to appreciate fine detail, some cases are to me:
Nakajima ki-201 Karyú: the colors and lights are so heavy the details can be appreciated.
Mitsubishi J4M Senden: in pages 94-95: the dark color against the very bright turn it's in a near black/white picture without detail.
Suzukase 20 in page 102: exagerated shadows striped detail from some parts of aircraft.
Nakajima J1N Gekko page 113: the same the shadows remove detail from the aircraft.
I was unable to found an example online and I don't want to scan nothing from the book so I've took a profile from from the wed and I adjusted it to look like the ones in the book. You can see a lot of details is lost in the shadows.

I prefer a lot the work from from Peter Allen , even some profiles have dark colors you can appreciate the detail, for example, here:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,4791.msg93284.html#msg93284
or the work from Skyrider3d on the Manshu ki-98 on the page 26 of the book.

I hope this don't sound to harsh I'm just trying to give my opinion about what is a very good and unique work but I think could be even better with some not so real render in the profiles.

Regards
Alcides
 

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Pelzig

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Just a note. I heard from the publisher that a reprint is planned for the book. Not sure when this run is supposed to occur but they are planning it. If it comes to pass, means the opportunity to obtain it for cover price or less again. ;D
 

Grey Havoc

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Hikoki1946 said:
Just a note. I heard from the publisher that a reprint is planned for the book. Not sure when this run is supposed to occur but they are planning it. If it comes to pass, means the opportunity to obtain it for cover price or less again. ;D
[rubs hands]
 

Pelzig

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I just had a look at the U.S. Amazon.com and see that they have 13 new starting at $30.14. So, looks like suppliers have gotten more copies which brought the price down to a reasonable level. ;D

Cheers,

Ed


Grey Havoc said:
Hikoki1946 said:
Just a note. I heard from the publisher that a reprint is planned for the book. Not sure when this run is supposed to occur but they are planning it. If it comes to pass, means the opportunity to obtain it for cover price or less again. ;D
[rubs hands]
 

pathology_doc

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Got my copy yesterday. I waited a long time because several previous attempts to order failed miserably and then the price was something exorbitant. But it was there, it was inexpensive, and I grabbed it.

I am... both elated and somewhat disappointed. It's certainly interesting to see the lines the Japanese designers were working on, and there are excellent analyses of why the projects either failed or were cancelled. I thought the illustrations were lovely, and I've got no issues on that score. It was interesting to see, as a contrast from Tony Buttler's books, the airplanes' stats presented with the aircraft instead of being summarised at the end of the chapter - thumbs up. Also BIG bonus points for detailing contemporary aircraft in other air forces and a brief history-in-a-sentence of what point the project got up to before it got the axe.

Negatives - I think the editors were having a bad day; there are a few more spelling and typo errors than in the other books. I'm of two minds about the style. At times I wondered whether Mr Dyer was channelling the spirit of Stewart Cowley, and the book feels far more disjointed, with relatively discrete descriptions of the various aircraft rather than a seamless whole. On the one hand, the individual projects are fascinting, and I commend the author for his efforts; on the other hand, the thing I've become accustomed to and enjoy so much about the other SP books is seeing the context of success in which the unsuccessful designs failed.

Of course it may also be that this was a feature of the Japanese procurement process, unlike the one described for the Western aircraft that saw several designs all compete to the same requirement and only one (or sometimes more) make it through. It's been a while since I read the Luftwaffe books, but I have a funny feeling that if I re-read them now (and I will re-read them when they finally arrive from Australia), I would have a similar complaint! And possibly for the same reason. (Was this one of the reasons the Allies won? Because their development/procurement cycle was generally more efficient, and less time was spent chasing dead ends?)

I shall have a re-read over the next few days. I suspect much of my praise will be reinforced and some of my criticisms diminished. All in all, though, a good read. 7/10.
 

Pelzig

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Greetings! Firstly, I'd like to thank you for purchasing the book but more importantly, for offering up your comments about it. Also, glad you were able to get it for a good price. True, for awhile, prices were well above the retail cost but of late, I've seen them down to at or below cover price which is good news for consumers.

As it happens, I actually do have a copy of "Spacecraft 2000-2100 AD" as well as "Spacewreck: Ghost Ships and Derelicts of Space". ;D But it has been many years since I looked at them and I can assure you my writing style wasn't influenced by Mr. Cowley. I think I bought them more for the art than the text.

And my apologies for typos. We tried to catch them all but yes, some got through. Curious what printing your copy is?

I can see what you mean in terms of structure to the book. The intent was to give each aircraft their chapter and within each chapter, give them a detailed description which I sought to write in such a way as to avoid being too "clinical" in the discourse. Tidbits of relative information were infused into the aircraft history to give the reader additional historical data to take away from the book (for example, the chapter on the Kitsuka and giving information on jet developments outside of Japan).

And yes, I do agree with you that the Allied weapon development was more centralized. A great fault of the German side was having multiple companies working in isolation on the same type of weapon. No sharing of information, just using up resources in duplicated efforts. The Imperial Japanese military, unlike most of the major powers, had two services (Army and Navy) with their own air forces and both were in competition with the other. Both had their own development centers and in some cases, components could not be shared between the aircraft of both services (one example is the Syusui's cannon armament which did not allow the Army's 30mm ammunition to work in the Navy's 30mm cannon and vice versa, thus requiring two different cannons to be produced along with ammunition for each type; this sucked up more resources and added to the logistical burden). Another example, again with the Syusui, is that the Army didn't like being forced to accept the Navy's J8M (as the Ki-200) and so they just went off and started their own version which they thought would be better (the Ki-202). Likewise, there was no sharing of technical research between the Navy's Kitsuka program and the Army's Ki-201 Karyu jet program. Granted, both jet designs were different but nonetheless, useful data could have been shared between the two groups. You would think that with the dawning of the jet age for Japan, they'd like to have their engineers and scientists working together rather than apart from each other. But the two air forces didn't think that way and fought working together pretty much throughout the war.

The Japanese still had competitions where competing designs battled it out for acceptance. But a good portion of the aircraft in the book did not (one example of a competition was between the Ki-87 and the Ki-94).

Thanks again for your kind words and comment. Much appreciated.



pathology_doc said:
Got my copy yesterday. I waited a long time because several previous attempts to order failed miserably and then the price was something exorbitant. But it was there, it was inexpensive, and I grabbed it.

I am... both elated and somewhat disappointed. It's certainly interesting to see the lines the Japanese designers were working on, and there are excellent analyses of why the projects either failed or were cancelled. I thought the illustrations were lovely, and I've got no issues on that score. It was interesting to see, as a contrast from Tony Buttler's books, the airplanes' stats presented with the aircraft instead of being summarised at the end of the chapter - thumbs up. Also BIG bonus points for detailing contemporary aircraft in other air forces and a brief history-in-a-sentence of what point the project got up to before it got the axe.

Negatives - I think the editors were having a bad day; there are a few more spelling and typo errors than in the other books. I'm of two minds about the style. At times I wondered whether Mr Dyer was channelling the spirit of Stewart Cowley, and the book feels far more disjointed, with relatively discrete descriptions of the various aircraft rather than a seamless whole. On the one hand, the individual projects are fascinting, and I commend the author for his efforts; on the other hand, the thing I've become accustomed to and enjoy so much about the other SP books is seeing the context of success in which the unsuccessful designs failed.

Of course it may also be that this was a feature of the Japanese procurement process, unlike the one described for the Western aircraft that saw several designs all compete to the same requirement and only one (or sometimes more) make it through. It's been a while since I read the Luftwaffe books, but I have a funny feeling that if I re-read them now (and I will re-read them when they finally arrive from Australia), I would have a similar complaint! And possibly for the same reason. (Was this one of the reasons the Allies won? Because their development/procurement cycle was generally more efficient, and less time was spent chasing dead ends?)

I shall have a re-read over the next few days. I suspect much of my praise will be reinforced and some of my criticisms diminished. All in all, though, a good read. 7/10.
 

pathology_doc

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Hi,

As I suspected, another read diminishes the criticisms somewhat, especially of layout. Though as far as Cowley is concerned, I have to say - once seen, never forgotten (joke!). ;) Perhaps it's seeing the completely fictitious Japanese designs which triggered that comparison.

The American air services were also separate (USN/USMC and USAAF), but their industry was big enough (and invulnerable enough) to afford it, and at least some of their companies (e.g. Douglas) built aircraft for both services.
 

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Just a quick note that work has commenced on the book with the Nakajima B4N1 and Hitachi He-Type Heavy Bomber chapters in the can with the Mitsubishi Ki-90 chapter nearing completion. ;D


Cheers,


Ed
 

Stargazer2006

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Hikoki1946 said:
Just a quick note that work has commenced on the book with the Nakajima B4N1 and Hitachi He-Type Heavy Bomber chapters in the can with the Mitsubishi Ki-90 chapter nearing completion. ;D
Awesome news!!! ;D
 

Pelzig

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Just a little update in that the Ki-90, Ki-84-II Kai, and G6M1 chapters are complete. 32 chapters to go. ;D
 

airman

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Any updates ?
::) ::)
Hikoki 1946 i am following you since your old site about japanese projects named like your nickname !
 

Pelzig

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Recent chapters in the can include the Kawanishi K-60, Koshiki A-3, the Yokosuka D5Y1, Mitsubishi 1MT1N, Kyushu Q3W Nankai, Kobeseiko Te-Go, Ki-48-II Kai and Ki-174, and the Aichi B8A Mokusei. Currently in the works is the chapter on the Ki-95 and Ki-103.

I should mention that the Ki-84-II chapter includes the Ki-106, Ki-113, Ki-116, and Ki-117.

Cheers!



airman said:
Any updates ?
::) ::)
Hikoki 1946 i am following you since your old site about japanese projects named like your nickname !
 

Stargazer2006

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Fascinating stuff!!! I'm really looking forward to it all, especially the Ki-174, B8A and D5Y1...
 

airman

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If Hikoki1946, in his work, have chance to also unedited materials on english language , surely is fascinating :)
 

Pelzig

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Aichi S1A Denko, Nakajima Ki-68, Kawanishi K-100, and the Kusho H7Y1 chapters complete.
 

Pelzig

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If you mean Japanese sources, yes, I use them. :)

airman said:
If Hikoki1946, in his work, have chance to also unedited materials on english language , surely is fascinating :)
 

Pelzig

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Kawasaki Ki-85, Nakajima Ki-86, Mitsubishi Ki-109, Kayaba Ka-1/Ka-2, Mitsubishi Ki-167, and Kugisho MXY4 chapters completed. :)
 

theponja

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Hikoki1946 said:
Kawasaki Ki-85, Nakajima Ki-86, Mitsubishi Ki-109, Kayaba Ka-1/Ka-2, Mitsubishi Ki-167, and Kugisho MXY4 chapters completed. :)

Don't do that, the wait is going kill me ;)
 

Pelzig

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So, I shouldn't say the Tachikawa Ki-104 and Kawanishi KX-3 chapters are complete? ;)



Alcides said:
Hikoki1946 said:
Kawasaki Ki-85, Nakajima Ki-86, Mitsubishi Ki-109, Kayaba Ka-1/Ka-2, Mitsubishi Ki-167, and Kugisho MXY4 chapters completed. :)

Don't do that, the wait is going kill me ;)
 

Pelzig

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As a side note, in a lot of the chapters, aircraft other than the chapter headliner are discussed if relevant and serve a purpose to illustrate a point. For example, even though the Nakajima G5M is not a chapter headliner, it is fully discussed in the chapter on the Nakajima Ki-68.


More information is great but hoping readers find it useful.
 

Pelzig

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A big change with JSP2 is that you will have many more photographs and line art in comparison to the almost all color profiles, artwork, and CG works in JSP1. Due to a highly restrictive budget, it was less expensive to source photographs than commission original artwork. Don't get me wrong, there will be some fresh art, and a number of line art and color profiles will appear for the first time in a English language book. As for photos, the attempt has been made to not use ones we are all familiar with but, obviously, there will be ones we've seen before. Can't be helped. :)


So, hopefully this change of pace in regards to illustration won't disappoint.
 

Sundog

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I don't think this will disappoint, at least not me anyway. Thank you for the heads up and I'm definitely looking forward to its release. :)
 

Stargazer2006

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This all sounds mighty good!!! ;D
 
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