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Grumman project list

Stargazer2006

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G-100 proposed development of F9F-9 with large equipment bay
G-101 10-12 seat transport aircraft study based on TF-1
G-102 10-12 seat jet transport study
G-103 CS2F-1 Tracker reworked by De Havilland Canada
G-104 proposed air refuelling tanker version of the TF-1
G-107 interceptor study
G-108 amphibian study
G-109 high-altitude weapon system study (including Eagle air-to-air missile)
G-110 FXF fighter studies (8 designs in all)
G-111 SA-16B and UF-2 Albatross, both redesignated as HU-16B
G-111T Albatross turbine conversions
G-112 improved S2F study
G-113 proposed J79-powered flex-deck Mach 2 interceptor
G-114 VTO study and survey
G-115 proposed development as photographic platform
G-116 twin-jet transport study
G-118 XF12F-1 Mach 2 plus fighter study
G-119 Mach 2 plus fighter study
G-120 proposed De Havilland of Canada version of Trader
G-122 small commercial twin-engine amphibian study
G-124 single-engined jet basic trainer study
G-126 proposed TF-1 training version with APS-28 and APA-57 for use by FAETU
G-127 wing/body interaction research model
G-128B Proposal SR-195
G-128C* Missileer proposal
G-128E Fleet defender version of Intruder with Long Range AAM
G-128F same as above; variant with twin tails and high wing; forerunner of the Mohawk design
G-128G Model 128-G12 VA(L), no details
G-128J EA-6B Prowler
G-128M Model 128M-4 with M shaped wing planform
G-128R Sandy Intruder (RESCAP)
G-128S A-6E Intruder
G-128U Intruder (ASW variant, not built)
G-128X Intruder (export version, not built)
G-1128 (?) EA-6B Prowler (CME version)
G-129 low-level attack conversions, optical sensors in ventral fairing (or G-128T?)
G-130 three-engined medium range jet transport project
G-132 Open Ocean Seaplane, ASW flying boat project with 4 x P&W R-2800-49, able to operate a sophisticated dunking sonar (competitor of Martin P7M Submaster) (1956)


I have a lot more numbers after this, but that will come later. Meanwhile, I hope these help!
 

Tailspin Turtle

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One more time - the D-118 was not designated by the Navy as the F12F and Grumman did not refer to the D-118 in their proposals as the F12F*. There is documentation that the Navy intended to designate a production J79-powered F11F derivative as the F12F, drafted a contract for it, and assigned two BuNos to the program. At some point, several years ago, an aviation enthusiast wrongly conflated the F11F upgrade documentation with the unsuccessful Grumman proposal to provide an alternative to the F4H Phantom and assumed that the D-118 was to be the F12F. Along the way the error has also garnered a fanciful popular name, "Lion".

*It was not unknown in the 1950s for a contractor to refer to a proposed aircraft in a brochure and/or presentation by the military designation it would have received. Examples are the "A2F" for an F11F attack derivative and "A3U" for at least a couple of Vought projects. Popular names were also suggested in proposals.
 

gatoraptor

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Stargazer2006 said:
G-1128 (?) EA-6B Prowler (CME version)
I seem to remember from my days at Grumman that A-6 engineering drawing numbers began with "128" while those specific to the EA-6B began with "1128". I don't know if it means that the Prowler's model number was indeed G-1128, but it could be a sign.

Similarly, I recall that Gulfstream I drawing numbers began with "159" while those for the Gulfstream II began with "1159".
 

Stargazer2006

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gatoraptor said:
Similarly, I recall that Gulfstream I drawing numbers began with "159" while those for the Gulfstream II began with "1159".
Ha! Glad to hear it from an insider! I thought for a moment that G-1159 was some journalistic invention...
 

Antheii

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Stargazer2006 said:
Ha! Glad to hear it from an insider! I thought for a moment that G-1159 was some journalistic invention...
Not so for G-1159, G-1159A and G-1159B.
But when the G-IV and G-V appeared, some people thought is was logical they were designated G-1159C and G-1159D, and presented this as a fact. Took some time before everybody understood those were 'journalistic inventions' :-(

Regards,

Hans
 

Stargazer2006

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From the Bernard Lindenbaum Vertical Flight Research Collection:

G-170A.............Tilt-Wing Rescue Aircraft project (1959)
G-242...............Tri-Service tilt-wing VTOL Aircraft Proposal (1961)
G-306...............Surface to Air Retrieval of Heavy Spacecraft by Fixed-Wing Aircraft
G-511A ............HELICAT (1970-71) --> details here: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,14708.0
 

nugo

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Design 137---Proposed TF-1 Trader upgrades.
Design 154---Proposed TF-1 Trader upgrades.
Design 325---YAS-2D, S-2D, 1966, proposed USAF attack conversion, 24 cancelled.
Source: http://www.uswarplanes.net/tracker.html
 

Stargazer2006

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Apparently G-273 was Grumman's initial proposal for the TFX program in May 1960.

General Dynamics then approached Grumman based on their experience with naval combat programs and together they developed the G-310 which became the F-111B proposal.

http://prototypes.free.fr/f111b/f111b-1.htm
 

Stargazer2006

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G-723: a proposed X-29 variant (X-29B) incorporating the General Electric ADEN (Augumented Deflector Exhaust Nozzle).

The G-723 configuration was tested in NASA's 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel in 1976 (Test 316) and in NASA's 30 X 60 Full Scale Tunnel in 1982-83 (Test 432). More pics of the latter can be found by following the link.
 

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Stargazer2006

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G-636: Grumman proposed HiMAT configuration

Grumman competed for the NASA highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) program around 1973 or 1974. This program was intended to demonstrate the integration of advanced technologies to achieve high sustained transonic maneuver capability. At that time UAVs were called RPVs, and the idea was to build an RPV to demonstrate the technologies. The Air Force was also a sponsor. It was assumed that the technologies would be advanced aerodynamics, aeroelastic tailoring to achieve a passive wing design that would deform to optimum shape at the various g loads, advanced flight controls (relaxed static stability) and thrust vectoring. Grumman originally had a configuration similar to the one being proposed by Rockwell, but Grumman’s evaluation was that with a similar configuration they would lose to Rockwell. In addition, having just put the F-14 into production, there was a strong sense that a variable sweep wing should be proposed. Essentially this was dictated by management: “no proposal goes out the door unless the wing has a pin in it.” So Grumman’s HiMAT proposal used a variable sweep wing with an advanced supercritical airfoil and an aeroelastically tailored wing to obtain its sustained transonic maneuver requirement. The key was to use advanced airfoils and nominally attached flow at the design point. Grumman was not using the vortex flow concepts being exploited by the General Dynamics and Northrop folks with the YF-16 and YF-17. Grumman lost to Rockwell. Note that the YF-16 and YF-17 RFPs came out in January of 1972, so the timing of HiMAT seems a little strange, although nobody knew how those programs were going to develop.
Source: Mason’s Perspective on the X-29
 

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Stargazer2006

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Design #305: proposed four-engined turboprop flying-boat for ASW duties from 1961, apparently developed from the G-132 project.
 

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Stargazer2006

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Stargazer2006

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Design #754: « Stalker » variable-geometry VTOL RPV project for AEW role, a 9800 lb aircraft powered by two jet engines: a 9,000 lb thrust lift engine and a 1,300 lb thrust cruise engine.

If built, the 754 was supposed to cruise at 210 knots for 14 hours at altitudes of 27,000 to 37,000 ft. with a 150 lb payload.With a wing span of 51 feet and folding wings, the Stalker would have been able to operate off of a destroyer or a frigate. The Stalker program was halted, presumably because of the two separate engines: when one engine was not in use, the aircraft was carrying dead weight which reduced the available payload.The pictures below are adapted from U.S. Patent #4,726,545 of 1988 (see attachment), and most likely depict the Stalker (not to be mistaken with the eponymous, much more recent Lockheed Martin UAV).
 

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Stargazer2006

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Design #118: Mach 2+ fighter designed as a missile-armed all-weather interceptor to complement the F8U-1. Two ordered in 1955 but cancelled in favour of XF4H-1.

NOTE: This is often found as the "XF12F-1" and even the « Lion », but while the former seems to have never been applied, the latter is most likely the product of some aviation buff's imagination.

More on the #118: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,491.0


 

Stargazer2006

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Design #870: fan-in-wing STOVL strike fighter project (1993). Predates all the work on STOVL conducted under the Northrop Grumman name.
 

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hesham

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Please note with me in this NASA report reference;


Grumman ASM-399-25 FX/VFAX report (means G-399 FX).
Grumman PDR-636A-2 HiMAT report (means G-636 HiMAT).
Grumman PDR-623-20 V/STOL Strike Fighter (means G-623).
Grumman PDR-607A-11 V/STOL Strike Fighter (means G-607).


Now we can get a conclusion;


PDM-653A-13 the effect of planform taper on supercritical wing design (may be G-653).
Report 393-73-1 a computer program for calculating the subsonic aerodynamics of complex
wing-body configuration (may be G-393).
Report PDR 651AA-5 forward swept wing feasibility study (sure G-651).
Report 391-69-1 correlation of measure and estimated minimum drag of the F-14A wind
tunnel model (sure G-391,a designation of F-14A).


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19790001856_1979001856.pdf
 

Stargazer2006

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I already had these in my list, so I guess I found them in the same document as you.

I don't think the G- prefix is automatic. It only applies to aircraft designs (just like the BV- for Boeing or the D for Bell).
 

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I have an official model number list from Grumman and the numbers run 1 thru 130 not G-1 thru G-130. -SP
 

hesham

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Stargazer2006 said:
I already had these in my list, so I guess I found them in the same document as you.

I don't think the G- prefix is automatic. It only applies to aircraft designs (just like the BV- for Boeing or the D for Bell).

If that is right,we can say the G-391 was applying to F-14A.
 

Stargazer2006

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hesham said:
If that is right,we can say the G-391 was applying to F-14A.
What I have for "391" is "Correlation of Measured and Estimated Minimum Drag of the F-14A Wind Tunnel Mode (1969)" so I guess, yes, the number "391" applied to F-14A-related studies. But it doesn't mean "G-391", just 391!!
 

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To confuse matters slightly, during the period that Grumman owned the Flxible Corporation [as Grumman-Flxible] (1978-1983), the somewhat infamous Flxible Metro transit bus was known as the Grumman 870. Also known as the Grumman 870 Advanced Design Bus (it was one of two designs created and accepted for the Urban Mass Transportation Administration's "Transbus" requirement).


CAPTION: New York City Transit Grumman 870 #236, preserved as an historic vehicle

DESCRIPTION: NYC Transit Grumman 870 #236 arrives at Jacob Riis Park on a special excursion as one of eight museum buses in the excursion.
IMAGE CREDIT: Adam E. Moreira/Wikimedia Commons​
 

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2.2 OVERVIEW OF SYSTEM CONCEPTS

The four SCDs that the GMSA team evaluated were developed by
teams led by Bechtel, Foster-Miller, Grumman, and Magneplane
as examples of potential U.S. systems. The HSGT alternatives
to which the SCD concepts were compared were the French TGV
steel-wheel-on-rail system and the German TR07 Maglev system.
The Japanese high-speed Maglev system is also described in
this section, but is not included in Table 2.1 due to lack of
performance information. Table 2.1 summarizes the general
performance results of the GMSA team evaluation. The section
that follows briefly describes the alternative foreign HSGT
systems and the SCD concepts.
2-10

2.2.2.3 Grumman SCD





The Grumman concept is an EMS with similarities to the German
TR07. However, Grumman's vehicles wrap around a Y-shaped
guideway and use a common set of vehicle magnets for
levitation, propulsion, and guidance. Guideway rails are
ferromagnetic and have LSM windings for propulsion. The
vehicle magnets are superconducting coils around
horseshoe-shaped iron cores. The pole faces are attracted to
iron rails on the underside of the guideway.
Nonsuperconducting control coils on each iron-core leg
modulate levitation and guidance forces to maintain a 1.6 inch
(40 mm) air gap. No secondary suspension is required to maintain
adequate ride quality. Propulsion is by conventional LSM
embedded in the guideway rail.

Grumman vehicles may be single- or multi-car consists with
tilt capability. The innovative guideway superstructure
consists of slender Y-shaped guideway sections (one for each
direction) mounted by outriggers every 15-feet to a 90-foot
(4.5 m to a 27 m) spline girder. The structural spline girder
serves both directions. Switching is accomplished with a
TR07-style bending guideway beam, shortened by use of a
sliding or rotating section.
Final Report on the National Maglev Initiative (1993)

Some (scant) background: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Maglev_Initiative

EDIT: The final technical report (1998) from the Government Maglev System Assessment Team: http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a358293.pdf
 

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BillRo

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Here is Northrop's bus:

www.bmpcoe.org/bestpractices/internal/north/grf _north_14html
 

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Steve Pace

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Years ago I had the misfortunes of having to ride on those rattletrap Grumman buses which were given back to Grumman after only a few years of disservice to the paying public in Tacoma, Washington. -SP
 
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