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Soviet N1 rocket

sferrin

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That must have been something to see them tip THAT beast to vertical.
 

Johnbr

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A video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLg1QUq5GQM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk8rc6p_jmc
 

Archibald

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One needs to put Benny Hill theme on that video...
 

merriman

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This is good stuff! Not too far from photo-real. Amazing.

David
 

FighterJock

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Anyone know what caused the N-1 rockets to fail? I have read various articles that say it was the engines that did not produce enough thrust to software problems in the rockets hardware.
 

flateric

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too lazy to read wiki?
 

Hobbes

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Beyond the immediate causes as described in Wikipedia:

- Early on, it was decided not to build a test stand for the first stage, as this would take too long (I've also seen a claim that a test stand would tie up too much of the USSR's concrete production, but haven't been to able to find a source for this). Instead, they planned to do a series of launches with dummy payloads. 14 tests were planned, and it was expected that a lot of these would lead to launch failures/explosions.

- The death of Korolev slowed down the program, and the new director wasn't a fan of the N-1.

- There were quality control issues (one of the failures was caused by welding slag left behind in a propellant tank).

- The engines were designed for single use, to the point where they couldn't be test-fired prior to installation in the stage. They 'solved' this by building engines in batches of 6, testing 3 of them and if they passed, installing the remaining 3. A follow-on design that fixed this was scheduled for the 5th launch, IIRC.
 

Grey Havoc

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With regards as to the L3 Lunar Expedition, as well as the follow on L3M plans:
L3 - Russian manned lunar expedition. Development begun in 1964. All hardware was test flown, but program cancelled in 1974 due to repeated failures of the project's N1 launch vehicle. Status: Cancelled 1974. Gross mass: 95,000 kg (209,000 lb).


L3M - Russian manned lunar base. Study 1970-1972. Follow-on to the L3, a two N1-launch manned lunar expedition designed and developed in the Soviet Union between 1969 and 1974. Status: Study 1970.
 
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