And we have a request for solicitation for a reverse engineering work on the heat exchanger (see attached doc) :
View: https://mobile.twitter.com/MarkThompson_DC/status/1366408888220741632

Despite the irony of Mike T, those things are fairly common in countries that still protect IP* (Bless them).

*occasionally a subcontractor would close its doors without being re-acquired by a third party (foreclosure, retirements of the owner, change in activity or market) and the engineering material or know-how would be simply lost.
They should ask China. China probably still has the design.
 
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New variation? Just for giggles and kicks? Bugging the media?
 
Hope it's not a write-off.
Looks like the LMLG lost downlock at touchdown, may have lost hydraulic pressure. Even with loss of hydraulic pressure, should have maintained a mechanical downlock condition. Won't be a write-off, they will get her up and flying again. A B-2 had a gear collapse in the hangar during non-routine maintenance in May 2002, this is what happens when you do not follow proper procedures when playing with proximity sensor states.
 

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10% of the B-2 force has crashed now. That's worse than the B-58.
In a span of over 20 years. 20 years of hustler would have probably left just enough for a few museums.
I was being facetious.
 
Random B-2 question: was the SDB ever integrated into the aircraft? I've never seen it listed as being operational with the a/c but I did once before, I think on this forum, see an image of four orange colored weapons on a rack in a B-2.
 
From "Jets and Classics" 1989 LaserDisc(https://www.ebay.com/itm/Jets-And-Classics-CAV-LASERDISC-/293577965607?_ul=IN): Early footage of B-2 Spirit AV-1 Serial No 82-1066 "Spirit Of America" first flight and landing gear testing, notable gettting a look at the heat pitot air data sensor deployed in conjunction with a 2 tone paint scheme that would be later dropped:

 
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B-2 has 4 engines but only 2 big inlets, so does it has a plate to separate the inside of each inlet into 2 different air ways (like concordes and B-1) or does the 2 engines share the airflow?
 
thanks for the photos, it is interesting to see that B-2 duct curve downward immediately just 1-2 meters behind the inlet mouth. I thought it would curve slightly and go all the way through the bump on top. So why the inlet bump on top of B-2 needed to be so long??
Screenshot_20220919_015118_Chrome.jpg
another question, what is this gap?
Screenshot_20220919_014403_Chrome.jpg
 
B-2 has 4 engines but only 2 big inlets, so does it has a plate to separate the inside of each inlet into 2 different air ways (like concordes and B-1) or does the 2 engines share the airflow?
A splitter isn't always necessary. For instance, on the XB-70, each inlet duct fed three engines.

damaged-engine.jpg
 
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thanks for the photos, it is interesting to see that B-2 duct curve downward immediately just 1-2 meters behind the inlet mouth. I thought it would curve slightly and go all the way through the bump on top. So why the inlet bump on top of B-2 needed to be so long??
View attachment 684228
For aerodynamic reasons... reduces drag in addition to housing equipment as mentioned above.

The inlet duct actually curves down over a somewhat longer distance than that, but still needs to drop fully into the wing to block radar signals from reaching and reflecting off the front engine blade disk (the engines themselves are fully buried in the wing as well).
 

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