In the event of an engine surge the flow reverses, such that gas comes out of the compressor inlet. If the surge was caused by a failure within the compressor, then it’s likely to be a mixture of gas and engine debris, such as blades. Engine debris in front of the other engine is going to FOD and fail it. Having no splitter is a great way to generate cascade (multiple) engine failures from one event. <Turn a drama into a crisis>

This was a lesson learned from early experience in particular with super sonic aircraft where surges where a way of life.
 
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For aerodynamic reasons... reduces drag in addition to housing equipment as mentioned above.
Yes, keeps the airflow attached to the skin as far as possible towards the exhaust. It it detaches, then there's turbulence and therefore drag.
 
I saw this photo, not sure how accurate it is though. The splitter position seem a bit high
t.jpg
 
Where did you find that photo?

It looks more like a plastic model than a real plane.
A real B-2 is much darker, and the white of the letters and other markings seems too bright.
The light coloured inside of the engine inlet duct and the auxiliary air inlet doors does not match any photos I've seen before.
 

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This increase in mishaps is becoming particularly worrying...

B-2 Stealth Bomber Damaged During Emergency Landing​

by Tyler Rogoway
Dec 10, 2022 9:18 PM
A B-2A Spirit stealth bomber experienced an in-flight emergency that resulting in an emergency landing that sparked a fire and damaged the aircraft. The incident occurred at Whiteman AFB in Missouri, where the fleet of just 20 B-2s in existence is primarily based.
The War Zone reached out to the 509th Bomb Wing public affairs for comment and they promptly responded with this description of the event:
"A U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit experienced an in-flight malfunction during routine operations today and was damaged on the runway at Whiteman Air Force Base after it successfully completed an emergency landing. There were no personnel injuries. There was a fire associated with the aircraft after landing, and the base fire department extinguished the fire. The incident is under investigation."
 

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The runway is still closed and some evidence suggests they haven't moved the plane yet. What's going on?
 
They don't want to further damage it. Grounded fleet for safety inspections on all jets. Problem happened in flight, caught fire after landing, I hear, We did this numerous times on our F-111 when I served in USAF. It will be moved when they have it figured out how to preserve it from further damage.
 

"Keeping in mind that the Raider’s payload is estimated to be at least half that of the Spirit, the former could notionally be armed with nearly a hundred of the ASuW-capable Small Diameter Bombs or SDBs (the B-2 can carry 192 of such weapons)."

Whooaa...I've been trying to establish for years whether B-2s were ever integrated with SDB, and this guy is implying there is a weapon specific rack system with nearly a hundred per bay...
 

"Keeping in mind that the Raider’s payload is estimated to be at least half that of the Spirit, the former could notionally be armed with nearly a hundred of the ASuW-capable Small Diameter Bombs or SDBs (the B-2 can carry 192 of such weapons)."

Whooaa...I've been trying to establish for years whether B-2s were ever integrated with SDB, and this guy is implying there is a weapon specific rack system with nearly a hundred per bay...
The B-2 had integrated SDB's for some time now.
 

"Keeping in mind that the Raider’s payload is estimated to be at least half that of the Spirit, the former could notionally be armed with nearly a hundred of the ASuW-capable Small Diameter Bombs or SDBs (the B-2 can carry 192 of such weapons)."

Whooaa...I've been trying to establish for years whether B-2s were ever integrated with SDB, and this guy is implying there is a weapon specific rack system with nearly a hundred per bay...
The B-2 had integrated SDB's for some time now.

Do you have a source for that? I've never found confirmation other than seeing a picture of a four round launcher in their bomb bay mounted on a rotary launcher. I certainly never heard of a total bomb load of 192. That would be rather significant change to the B-2's combat capability compared to the 80 JDAM configuration.
 

"Keeping in mind that the Raider’s payload is estimated to be at least half that of the Spirit, the former could notionally be armed with nearly a hundred of the ASuW-capable Small Diameter Bombs or SDBs (the B-2 can carry 192 of such weapons)."

Whooaa...I've been trying to establish for years whether B-2s were ever integrated with SDB, and this guy is implying there is a weapon specific rack system with nearly a hundred per bay...
The B-2 had integrated SDB's for some time now.

Do you have a source for that? I've never found confirmation other than seeing a picture of a four round launcher in their bomb bay mounted on a rotary launcher. I certainly never heard of a total bomb load of 192. That would be rather significant change to the B-2's combat capability compared to the 80 JDAM configuration.
The USAF and NGC integrated SDB after I left in 1996. The B-2 uses the Smart Bomb Rack system (2 per bay) which can handle a variety of free-fall and GPS guided bombs for 2000, 1000, 500, and 250 lb (SDB) units, plus other munitions as well, very versatile rack system. The big boy GPS munitions like the 5000 lb and 30 klb units and of course the missiles use the RLAs.
 
The USAF and NGC integrated SDB after I left in 1996. The B-2 uses the Smart Bomb Rack system (2 per bay) which can handle a variety of free-fall and GPS guided bombs for 2000, 1000, 500, and 250 lb (SDB) units, plus other munitions as well, very versatile rack system. The big boy GPS munitions like the 5000 lb and 30 klb units and of course the missiles use the RLAs.

Thanks for that. I was aware of the smart rack but thought it was limited to Mk82 JDAMs specifically. If it isn't classified, can you give the number of munitions carried for each type? I am only aware of Mk82 carriage being 4 across, 5 deep, in two sets back to back (presumably two smart racks), for 40 per bay, from publicly posted internal bomb bay footage.
 
The USAF and NGC integrated SDB after I left in 1996. The B-2 uses the Smart Bomb Rack system (2 per bay) which can handle a variety of free-fall and GPS guided bombs for 2000, 1000, 500, and 250 lb (SDB) units, plus other munitions as well, very versatile rack system. The big boy GPS munitions like the 5000 lb and 30 klb units and of course the missiles use the RLAs.

Thanks for that. I was aware of the smart rack but thought it was limited to Mk82 JDAMs specifically. If it isn't classified, can you give the number of munitions carried for each type? I am only aware of Mk82 carriage being 4 across, 5 deep, in two sets back to back (presumably two smart racks), for 40 per bay, from publicly posted internal bomb bay footage.
Sorry I can’t find the source but I think I remember reading a 192 SDBs “potential”

It was part of a study, I know I downloaded but probably 3 laptops ago, about the USAF looking to have a week long “aim point” surge capability of 6000/day in the opening days of a full on Pacific war against China.
 

Do you have a source for that? I've never found confirmation other than seeing a picture of a four round launcher in their bomb bay mounted on a rotary launcher. I certainly never heard of a total bomb load of 192. That would be rather significant change to the B-2's combat capability compared to the 80 JDAM configuration.

The Air Force still lists B-2 as a future integration target for SDB. No indication that either SDB-I or II has been integrated so far.

The USAF and NGC integrated SDB after I left in 1996. The B-2 uses the Smart Bomb Rack system (2 per bay) which can handle a variety of free-fall and GPS guided bombs for 2000, 1000, 500, and 250 lb (SDB) units, plus other munitions as well, very versatile rack system. The big boy GPS munitions like the 5000 lb and 30 klb units and of course the missiles use the RLAs.

The Smart Bomb Rack yes, but I've never seen any indication it's for anything other than 500-lb JDAMs.

There is probably no way, physically, to put multiple SDBs in a rack designed around 500-lb weapons. Certainly not 192 of them.

The BRU-61 rack is reportedly (per multiple sources) mandatory for SDB-I at least (yes, we've seen Laser SDB in single fits on UAVs but nothing else, AFAICT). The form factor for the BRU-61 with 4 SDB is much more like a 2000-lb weapon -- 143 inches long (vs 149-152 for a GBU-31) and 1,460 lbs (vs 2,036-2,113 for the GBU-31). So four SDB on their rack replace one 2000-lb JDAM, which gives you a max of 96 in a B-1B or 64 on a B-2. Which is a step backwards from the SBR with 80x500-lb JDAMs.
 

Do you have a source for that? I've never found confirmation other than seeing a picture of a four round launcher in their bomb bay mounted on a rotary launcher. I certainly never heard of a total bomb load of 192. That would be rather significant change to the B-2's combat capability compared to the 80 JDAM configuration.

The Air Force still lists B-2 as a future integration target for SDB. No indication that either SDB-I or II has been integrated so far.

The USAF and NGC integrated SDB after I left in 1996. The B-2 uses the Smart Bomb Rack system (2 per bay) which can handle a variety of free-fall and GPS guided bombs for 2000, 1000, 500, and 250 lb (SDB) units, plus other munitions as well, very versatile rack system. The big boy GPS munitions like the 5000 lb and 30 klb units and of course the missiles use the RLAs.

The Smart Bomb Rack yes, but I've never seen any indication it's for anything other than 500-lb JDAMs.

There is probably no way, physically, to put multiple SDBs in a rack designed around 500-lb weapons. Certainly not 192 of them.

The BRU-61 rack is reportedly (per multiple sources) mandatory for SDB-I at least (yes, we've seen Laser SDB in single fits on UAVs but nothing else, AFAICT). The form factor for the BRU-61 with 4 SDB is much more like a 2000-lb weapon -- 143 inches long (vs 149-152 for a GBU-31) and 1,460 lbs (vs 2,036-2,113 for the GBU-31). So four SDB on their rack replace one 2000-lb JDAM, which gives you a max of 96 in a B-1B or 64 on a B-2. Which is a step backwards from the SBR with 80x500-lb JDAMs.
From what I remember and which public was 160 SDBs. Plus I was wrong previously, the 2000 lb bombs used the RLAs. Again, the SBR was designed to be very versatile and modular.
 
On the other hand, would it be that hard to have a rack of some kind that did that for a weapon that is less than half the diameter and shorter? 6 x8 x 2, or given the <6 foot length, 4x8x3?

It seems to me optimizing a rack system for glide bombs leverages the high altitude of a b-2/21. The stand off range must only increase. Plus not lighting off a jet or a rocket engine must be a lower IR signature weapon release. I can’t believe someone wouldn’t design a ln SDB specific rack for these platforms.
 
“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached
 

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“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached

Thanks! Presumably 64 is using the rotary launcher with four round racks and anything greater would be SBRs.
 
“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached

Thanks, so this explains the numbers.

I still suspect the actual integration hasn't happened yet. As of 2019 at least, the Air Force was listing the B-2 as a future integration effort.
 
“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached

Thanks, so this explains the numbers.

I still suspect the actual integration hasn't happened yet. As of 2019 at least, the Air Force was listing the B-2 as a future integration effort.

Which is surprising given what an effective platform it would be for dispensing them and what a vast bomb load it could carry using smaller ordnance. I'd have thought delivering nearly a couple hundred PGMs from 100-150km out would be a high priority for the USAF's goal of deterring the PRC, even across such a small fleet of aircraft. A half dozen B-2s (likely about all that you could count on being combat ready at any one time) could dispense over a thousand munitions in one raid.
 
“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached

Thanks, so this explains the numbers.

I still suspect the actual integration hasn't happened yet. As of 2019 at least, the Air Force was listing the B-2 as a future integration effort.

Which is surprising given what an effective platform it would be for dispensing them and what a vast bomb load it could carry using smaller ordnance. I'd have thought delivering nearly a couple hundred PGMs from 100-150km out would be a high priority for the USAF's goal of deterring the PRC, even across such a small fleet of aircraft. A half dozen B-2s (likely about all that you could count on being combat ready at any one time) could dispense over a thousand munitions in one raid.

Eighty JDAM is already a lot. And JDAM does glide quite a distance, especially from altitude. If JDAM-ER were adopted, that would be even better (it was tested in a 500-lb form).
 
“Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) Integration. The SDB is a near-precision winged 250-pound class glide weapon with moderate off-axis and standoff capability. Weapon accuracy and high loadout will enable massive conventional attack. The B-2 is expected to carry between 64 and 192 SDBs on one sortie”
———-
From pg. 19 in the attached

Thanks, so this explains the numbers.

I still suspect the actual integration hasn't happened yet. As of 2019 at least, the Air Force was listing the B-2 as a future integration effort.

Which is surprising given what an effective platform it would be for dispensing them and what a vast bomb load it could carry using smaller ordnance. I'd have thought delivering nearly a couple hundred PGMs from 100-150km out would be a high priority for the USAF's goal of deterring the PRC, even across such a small fleet of aircraft. A half dozen B-2s (likely about all that you could count on being combat ready at any one time) could dispense over a thousand munitions in one raid.

Eighty JDAM is already a lot. And JDAM does glide quite a distance, especially from altitude. If JDAM-ER were adopted, that would be even better (it was tested in a 500-lb form).

True, but SBD-I would give you better penetration and a much longer glide range, were it integrated. SBD-II would give you far more target flexibility as well with a terminal seeker. It seems like a no brainer to me to add them to the B-2s capabilities, along with sufficient mission planning capabilities to actually employ that many weapons in an effective way - storing and uploading a hundred aimpoints probably actually runs up against some software or hardware limitations on the B-2...
 
True, but SBD-I would give you better penetration and a much longer glide range, were it integrated. SBD-II would give you far more target flexibility as well with a terminal seeker. It seems like a no brainer to me to add them to the B-2s capabilities, along with sufficient mission planning capabilities to actually employ that many weapons in an effective way - storing and uploading a hundred aimpoints probably actually runs up against some software or hardware limitations on the B-2...

Ultimately, sure, you'd love to integrate every weapon with every platform. But there are constraints.

One that jumps out at me is the number of SDBs available. Loading up 6 B-2s with ~200 weapons is a non-trivial fraction of the total SDB-I procurement. Something like 10% of the planned USAF inventory. Even a full-scale drop test would eat more than one percent of the stockpile.
 
True, but SBD-I would give you better penetration and a much longer glide range, were it integrated. SBD-II would give you far more target flexibility as well with a terminal seeker. It seems like a no brainer to me to add them to the B-2s capabilities, along with sufficient mission planning capabilities to actually employ that many weapons in an effective way - storing and uploading a hundred aimpoints probably actually runs up against some software or hardware limitations on the B-2...

Ultimately, sure, you'd love to integrate every weapon with every platform. But there are constraints.

One that jumps out at me is the number of SDBs available. Loading up 6 B-2s with ~200 weapons is a non-trivial fraction of the total SDB-I procurement. Something like 10% of the planned USAF inventory. Even a full-scale drop test would eat more than one percent of the stockpile.

I was under the impression there were nearly 20,000 GBU-39 produced already (some expended, some sold to foreign countries) along with a couple thousand GBU-53, even though it only just entered full production? I think the bigger limitation would probably the B-2's avionics talking to all those weapons, particularly the Stormbreaker which apparently requires a lot of prep time to load onto the F-15Es. But while you can't integrate every weapon onto every platform, I'd think cheap stand off glide weapons would be a natural thing to put on B-2s, even if perhaps it was limited to a similar number as the JDAMs.

EDIT: Is the USAF going to stop production of SDB-I soon?
 
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I was under the impression there were nearly 20,000 GBU-39 produced (some expended, some sold to foreign countries) along with already a couple thousand GBU-53, even though it only just entered full production? I think the bigger limitation would probably the B-2's avionics talking to all those weapons, particularly the Stormbreaker which apparently requires a lot of prep time to load onto the F-15Es. But while you can't integrate every weapon onto every platform, I'd think cheap stand off glide weapons would be a natural thing to put on B-2s, even if perhaps it was limited to a similar number as the JDAMs.

Not definitive, but Forecast International has the planned procurement of SDB-I for the USAF as 12,000 rounds. Six times 192 would be 1,152 SDBs, or about 9-10% of that planned USAF procurement (not accounting for other uses over the years). Now, the planned procurement might have gone up since whenever that report was written, but we're still talking a huge fraction of the USAF's total.

 
Not definitive, but Forecast International has the planned procurement of SDB-I for the USAF as 12,000 rounds. Six times 192 would be 1,152 SDBs, or about 9-10% of that planned USAF procurement (not accounting for other uses over the years). Now, the planned procurement might have gone up since whenever that report was written, but we're still talking a huge fraction of the USAF's total.

Fair enough, but IMO that is just an argument for more SDBs. If you can't spring for a $50,000 piece of ordnance, what are you even doing? The 12,000 number is even harder to believe in the context of the USAF having about 6000 AGM-158s of all types by 2026 (per that CSIS wargame paper), and I've seen it stated that USAF's goal is ~10,000. I can't fathom. why they wouldn't stock up cheaper glide weapons. The lesson in Ukraine seems to be that a peer war will consume ordnance, even PGMs, at rates unsustainable by production.

I notice that document does explicitly list GBU-39 as integrated on the B-2; pertinent to is it integrated/is current only planned to be integrated discussion.
 
I notice that document does explicitly list GBU-39 as integrated on the B-2; pertinent to is it integrated/is current only planned to be integrated discussion.

Sure, but contra that:


The F-15E Strike Eagle is currently the only aircraft outfitted with the SDB weapon system. Future platforms include the F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-117, B-1 Lancer, B-2 Spirit, F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II.

Now, that's at least somewhat out of date (F-22 and F-35 have been cleared, I think), but it's not resounding endorsement of the idea that the B-2 can carry SDB-I.

And after some digging around on Twitter, I found a ref that sounds like he knows what he's talking about. (Usual caveats for Twitter reliability, etc. But poking at his blog, he mentions having worked on the B-2's Smart Bomb Rack and JDAM integration for the RLA, so I suspect he's legit.)

View: https://twitter.com/SMSgt_Mac/status/1511547774361341953
 

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