Douglas Model 1875 Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Logistic Carrier (1955)

jzichek

ACCESS: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2008
Messages
279
Reaction score
119
Website
www.patreon.com
Just put up a new article at RetroMechanix.com on these bizarre Douglas nuclear-powered transport studies which appear to use components of the C-133 Cargomaster:

5714090409_d220a53f01_o.gif


Features two hi res blueprints and 3 configurations; check it out! Details on them are limited, so if you have additional information, feel free to comment here or on the site.

-Jared
 

Nik

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
522
Reaction score
179
At least the latter had wheels under *one* side of the cargo pods...

Presumably both designs would have jacks under the pods to assist loading ??
 

jzichek

ACCESS: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2008
Messages
279
Reaction score
119
Website
www.patreon.com
Yes, the twin fuselage version certainly had a peculiar main gear arrangement. Jacks under the pods seem probable but I don't have further information on the designs to verify it. Does anyone have an idea what model of turboprop was likely used? It's pretty amazing that an aircraft of this scale had only two of them.

Nuclear-powered aircraft studies are some of the weirdest designs ever - they had to be huge to carry the reactor and shielding, and the crew had to be placed as far away from the reactor as reasonably possible, resulting in some very odd looking birds. I love 'em!
 

fishjay

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
23
Reaction score
5
Have you been able to determine what the diameter of the propellers would have been? The things look huge in the drawings when compared to the fuselage.

Fishjay
 

jzichek

ACCESS: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2008
Messages
279
Reaction score
119
Website
www.patreon.com
The props were 28' in diameter, counter-rotating, 8 blades total per engine. Just developing the props alone probably would have cost a small fortune!
 

RanulfC

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Mar 6, 2009
Messages
988
Reaction score
487
Was the "nuke" power-plant in the centerline-aerodynamic pod between the engines?

Randy
 

jzichek

ACCESS: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2008
Messages
279
Reaction score
119
Website
www.patreon.com
Yes; if you click and enlarge the blueprint (located at http://retromechanix.com/articles/aerospace/douglas-model-1875-aircraft-nuclear-propulsion-logistic-carrier-1955/?pid=1459), you can make out the dotted outline of the reactor, which is represented by a sphere.
 

GTX

All hail the God of Frustration!!!
Staff member
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2006
Messages
3,611
Reaction score
1,871
Website
beyondthesprues.com
I am curious - is the above drawing indicating that the aircraft was also able to be propelled by the nuclear turbine installation or is it simply a carrier platform?
 

fightingirish

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2006
Messages
2,546
Reaction score
1,233
IMHO. either a flying test bed or a enlarged C-133 Cargomaster carrying an exchange reactor and engine unit.
 

Barrington Bond

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2007
Messages
937
Reaction score
176
Why would it have intakes if it wasn't going to operate them in the air - and if it's operating those beasties they must be exhausting through the rear and creating thrust.

Regards,
Barry
 

royabulgaf

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Dec 29, 2008
Messages
550
Reaction score
145
Nuclear reactors cannot be turned on and off with a switch. Perhaps they needed to be cooled while they were transported.
 
Top