• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

US Space Shuttle Projects

Graham1973

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2010
Messages
1,490
Reaction score
242
Sorry about the lack of specs on this one, but it's a cool picture dating from shortly after the final decision on which shuttle they were going to build.
 

Attachments

  • InSpaceRefuelling.png
    InSpaceRefuelling.png
    906.9 KB · Views: 369

blackstar

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2008
Messages
1,778
Reaction score
156
Graham1973 said:
Sorry about the lack of specs on this one, but it's a cool picture dating from shortly after the final decision on which shuttle they were going to build.

Looks to me like it is depicting a tug pulling a payload away, with another payload in the forward bay. They never actually carried anything like that, and that doesn't seem like a good way to do it. Would you want a robotic craft approaching the shuttle under power? Probably better to have the shuttle do the approach.
 

Matej

Multiuniversal creator
Joined
Feb 13, 2006
Messages
2,616
Reaction score
116
Website
www.hitechweb.genezis.eu
Wow, thats nice. It was in one of the first sixty presentations that appear, when you type "FESTIP filetype:pDF" to the google. Not something I was looking for, so I did only printscreen.
 

PlanesPictures

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 13, 2006
Messages
974
Reaction score
437
from my work
 

Attachments

  • GR_.jpg
    GR_.jpg
    129.6 KB · Views: 184
  • MDD_.jpg
    MDD_.jpg
    249.9 KB · Views: 211
  • NA_.jpg
    NA_.jpg
    193.4 KB · Views: 216

Graham1973

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2010
Messages
1,490
Reaction score
242
blackstar said:
Graham1973 said:
Sorry about the lack of specs on this one, but it's a cool picture dating from shortly after the final decision on which shuttle they were going to build.

Looks to me like it is depicting a tug pulling a payload away, with another payload in the forward bay. They never actually carried anything like that, and that doesn't seem like a good way to do it. Would you want a robotic craft approaching the shuttle under power? Probably better to have the shuttle do the approach.

What it depicts is the last gasp of the Integrated Manned Program. The Space Tug (left in orbit by another shuttle) has just docked with & is pulling a Refuelling Module (RM) away from the shuttle. Once it has topped up it's fuel tanks the tug will release the RM and re-rendezvous with the shuttle to dock with the payload held in the shuttles RMS arms.

After placing the payload into transfer orbit the tug will re-dock with the RM & again top up it's tanks before returning the RM to the shuttle.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720023151_1972023151.pdf
 

blackstar

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2008
Messages
1,778
Reaction score
156
Graham1973 said:
What it depicts is the last gasp of the Integrated Manned Program. The Space Tug (left in orbit by another shuttle) has just docked with & is pulling a Refuelling Module (RM) away from the shuttle. Once it has topped up it's fuel tanks the tug will release the RM and re-rendezvous with the shuttle to dock with the payload held in the shuttles RMS arms.

After placing the payload into transfer orbit the tug will re-dock with the RM & again top up it's tanks before returning the RM to the shuttle.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720023151_1972023151.pdf

That's interesting. But I note that the payload has its own upper stage (including rocket bell) so it should not require a boost to GEO. I think that is a mistake on the artist's part.
 

Archibald

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
4,198
Reaction score
1,734
Michel Van said:
Ultra Cool PDF B)
THX, Flateric ;D

Agreed. Mutated shuttles aplenty... I'm very fond of the stretched orbiter, much less stubby-looking than the orginal. Almost graceful !
By contrast the hammerhead ET is, eerhm, quite phallic looking. Kind of Austin Powers shuttle - groovy baby !
 

Stargazer2006

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
13,235
Reaction score
454
Apparently the name Triamese was not just for the FR-4 variant, but for the whole FR- series of designs. Also it appears that the FR- series were NASA-given, not Convair, designations:

There were at least five ways to build a fully-reusable shuttle, and NASA had appropriate designations and descriptions:

FR-1
: the Triamese;
FR-2
: a two-stage vehicle with the engines of both stages ignited at launch;
FR-3
: a two-stage vehicle with engines in the orbiter ignited only upon staging (Faget's shuttle was an FR-3; so were the concepts of McDonnell Douglas);
FR-4
: a variant of the Triamese with the core stage not of the same length as the twin booster stages;
FR-5
: a concept designed to avoid a shift in its center of gravity as its propellant tanks would empty, thus easing problems of stability and control.

Source: The Space Shuttle Decision http://www.munseys.com/diskone/nasfour.htm
 

Graham1973

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2010
Messages
1,490
Reaction score
242
blackstar said:
Graham1973 said:
What it depicts is the last gasp of the Integrated Manned Program. The Space Tug (left in orbit by another shuttle) has just docked with & is pulling a Refuelling Module (RM) away from the shuttle. Once it has topped up it's fuel tanks the tug will release the RM and re-rendezvous with the shuttle to dock with the payload held in the shuttles RMS arms.

After placing the payload into transfer orbit the tug will re-dock with the RM & again top up it's tanks before returning the RM to the shuttle.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720023151_1972023151.pdf

That's interesting. But I note that the payload has its own upper stage (including rocket bell) so it should not require a boost to GEO. I think that is a mistake on the artist's part.

Actually that upper stage is a solid fuel stage to circularize the orbit once it reaches GTO if I've read the report correctly.
 

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
501
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Artist's impressions from San Diego Air & Space Museum Archive.

Source:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691184139/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691184329/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691184367/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691184433/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185227/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185347/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185391/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185483/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185529/sizes/o/in/photostream/
 

Attachments

  • 6691185529_a73bcb4b4a_o.jpg
    6691185529_a73bcb4b4a_o.jpg
    168.2 KB · Views: 112
  • 6691185483_e57cac7078_o.jpg
    6691185483_e57cac7078_o.jpg
    134.3 KB · Views: 90
  • 6691185347_b479fd0006_o.jpg
    6691185347_b479fd0006_o.jpg
    85.5 KB · Views: 74
  • 6691185227_d8d9cd1024_o.jpg
    6691185227_d8d9cd1024_o.jpg
    125 KB · Views: 901
  • 6691184433_15f0c3a68d_o.jpg
    6691184433_15f0c3a68d_o.jpg
    97.1 KB · Views: 930
  • 6691184367_a70fb2a096_o.jpg
    6691184367_a70fb2a096_o.jpg
    160.1 KB · Views: 958
  • 6691184329_bc9f302668_o.jpg
    6691184329_bc9f302668_o.jpg
    138.6 KB · Views: 1,004
  • 6691184139_145d48e869_o.jpg
    6691184139_145d48e869_o.jpg
    228.4 KB · Views: 1,045

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
501
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185609/sizes/o/in/photostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6691185669/sizes/l/in/photostream/
 

Attachments

  • 6691185669_68ef8bf75e_o.jpg
    6691185669_68ef8bf75e_o.jpg
    181.6 KB · Views: 122
  • 6691185609_0e31264f2a_o.jpg
    6691185609_0e31264f2a_o.jpg
    130.4 KB · Views: 94

Graham1973

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2010
Messages
1,490
Reaction score
242
Impressive, I've seen one of those pictures at the NTRS, but many are new to me.
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,763
Reaction score
1,908
http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/03/what-shuttle-should-have-been-the-october-1977-flight-manifest/

Soon after President Richard Nixon gave his blessing to the Space Shuttle Program on 5 January 1972, NASA targeted its first orbital flight for 1977, then for March 1978. By early 1975, the date had slipped to March 1979. Funding shortfalls were to blame, as were the daunting technical challenges of developing the world’s first reusable orbital spaceship with 1970s technology. The schedule slip was actually worse than NASA let on: as early as 31 January 1975, an internal NASA document gave a “90% probability date” for the first Shuttle launch of December 1979.

In October 1977, Chester Lee, director of Space Transportation System (STS) Operations at NASA Headquarters, distributed the first edition of the STS Flight Assignment Baseline, a launch schedule and payload manifest for the first 16 operational Shuttle missions. The document was in keeping with NASA’s stated philosophy that reusable Shuttle Orbiters would fly on-time and often, like a fleet of cargo airplanes. The STS Utilization and Operations Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston had prepared the document, which was meant to be revised quarterly as new customers chose the Space Shuttle as their cheap and reliable ride to space.
 

GeorgeA

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2006
Messages
791
Reaction score
121
Well, the engine kept blowing up, taking its test stand with it on several occasions. That tended to play havoc with the PERT charts.
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,763
Reaction score
1,908
Shuttle Enterprise this week:


[IMAGE CREDIT: BBC NEWS/Michael Nagle/Getty Images]
:(
 

Stargazer2006

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
13,235
Reaction score
454
Some fantastic artwork at SDASM. Wasn't that a Grumman proposal?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142847781/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760546/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760322/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142847843/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142848027/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760728/
 

Antonio

ACCESS: Top Secret
Staff member
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Messages
3,457
Reaction score
187
Michel, you posted twice the same link ;)
 

Stargazer2006

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
13,235
Reaction score
454
I wasn't talking about the Shuttle, but more about the huge launch vehicle, which appears in all six illustrations.
 

Michel Van

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2007
Messages
4,644
Reaction score
656
Stargazer2006 said:
I wasn't talking about the Shuttle, but more about the huge launch vehicle, which appears in all six illustrations.


ooh, dat is Shuttle first stage booster before they switch on Solid booster on 1973
 

ender

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Jun 19, 2006
Messages
21
Reaction score
3
Hello

it should be the June 1971 Phase B proposal combination of General Dynamics B9U booster and North American NAR-161-B orbiter.

Best regards,
Carmine
 

NUSNA_Moebius

I really should change my personal text
Joined
May 26, 2012
Messages
170
Reaction score
29
The Artist said:
That looks like a Star Clipper variation.

Indeed. And I've always like the Starclipper basic configuration. Seemed workable and with a sizable portion of fuel storage on the craft itself, the external tanks with a bit of redesign could be jettisoned at a practically low altitude for proper recovery. The external tanks could be given a more lifting body-ish design as well as a "platform" for the shuttle to "sit" on that also could work as a deflection lifting surface and protection for atmospheric reentry. I'm sure plenty would argue against the design, but it seemed quite sound to me.
 

The Artist

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
638
Reaction score
252
If you haven't already, you must check out Scott's Aerospace Projects Review, Volume 3, Number 2. Good Star Clipper material in that one.
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,763
Reaction score
1,908
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center initial proposal/study for refurbishing Skylab for Shuttle operations: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/07/nasa-marshalls-skylab-reuse-study-1977/


Skylab in Phase III configuration, c. 1984. Image: Junior Miranda
(Wired.com)​
 

hesham

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
26,673
Reaction score
3,465
ender said:
Hello

it should be the June 1971 Phase B proposal combination of General Dynamics B9U booster and North American NAR-161-B orbiter.

Best regards,
Carmine


There was also a North American Model-140 and Model-160 orbiters.
 

circle-5

ACCESS: Top Secret
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2009
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
130
"Excess Personal Property": $1,980,674,785.00
 

Attachments

  • Transfer Order.jpg
    Transfer Order.jpg
    670.3 KB · Views: 740
R

RGClark

Guest
Stargazer2006 said:
Some fantastic artwork at SDASM. Wasn't that a Grumman proposal?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142847781/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760546/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760322/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142847843/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7142848027/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/6996760728/

Thanks for that very cool. Dig all those engines.

Bob Clark
 

XP67_Moonbat

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
2,160
Reaction score
55
10 Space Shuttles Which Never Flew.

http://www.armaghplanet.com/blog/10-shuttles-which-never-flew.html
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,763
Reaction score
1,908
http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-19542934

Bill Moggridge, a British industrial designer who created the original computer laptop shape, has died.

Mr Moggridge died from cancer at the age of 69.

His computer, the Grid Compass, was designed in 1979 and initially used by the American military. It retailed at $8,150 (£5,097) and was installed on board the space shuttle Discovery.

The magnesium-cased device was distinctive because the screen display folded down over the keyboard.


RIP
 

Stargazer2006

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
13,235
Reaction score
454
Not being a Space Shuttle specialist (and not a "space person", more generally) I do not know exactly what project was evaluated in this sub-scale model hanging from below a Sikorsky CH-54, but I'm sure someone will identify soonest...

MANNED SPACECRAFT CENTER, HOUSTON,, TEXAS - - MSC SPACE ORBITER SHUTTLECRAFT — The one-tenth size dynamically scaled experimental model of the proposed "MSC 12.5K Space Orbiter Shuttlecraft" is shown mounted under a U.S. Army CH-54 helicopter prior to a successful drop test at Fort Hood, Texas, on May 4, 1970, The initial drop test at Fort Hood and the continuing drop tests at
the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico are to demonstrate the test vehicle's transition from a high angle of attack reentry to a level cruise attitude, the stability of the vehicle in stalled conditions, and to obtain freeflight data to assist in aerodynamic analytical transition prediction techniques. The shuttle test vehicle is about 13 feet long, with a fuselage two feet in diameter, an eight-foot wing span; and it weighs about 600 pound. Construction of the test vehicle is of aluminum and fiberglass. Maximum drop altitudes will be 12„000 feet.

Source: Sikorsky promotional photo, for release on May 22, 1970
 

Attachments

  • CH-54 + shuttle.jpg
    CH-54 + shuttle.jpg
    381.7 KB · Views: 792

Similar threads

Top