T-X Trainer - Boeing T-7A Red Hawk

TomcatViP

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And the very similar search from the Navy:

 

SgtGungHo

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Australia will probably be the next operator. Given industrial connections between Australian and Boeing, I can't think of a valid reason why Austarlia would want anything other than T-7A, especially when USAF will use the AJT.
 

GTX

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Australia will probably be the next operator. Given industrial connections between Australian and Boeing, I can't think of a valid reason why Austarlia would want anything other than T-7A, especially when USAF will use the AJT.
Not until 2030s at this stage.
 

bring_it_on

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More on the ATT (Advanced Tactical Trainer) effort:

Asked if acquiring the system—the requirements of which are very similar to the capability in the new T-7 trainer—will have to wait until the T-7 buy is complete, Kelly said the ATT won’t necessarily be a T-7 variant.

I don't think Boeing would have a problem delivering two variants. IIRC they built their production process to be able to support 60 deliveries a year, and the T-7 USAF buy is going to max out at something like 48 a year. So even without increasing production, there is a little bit of room in the current system to ramp up to its full rate and deliver about a dozen aircraft a year for a new requirement.
 

bring_it_on

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First EMD aircraft seems to be on track to fly before end of 2021.


The main issue known as wing rock was discovered during flight testing, said Paul Niewald, Boeing’s vice president of T-7 programs.

“We saw an anomaly in the data,” he said during a briefing with reporters in September at the Air Force Association’s annual conference. “We had this wing rock at 25/26 degrees angle of attack — so the left and right wing gently rock back and forth.”

Brown, speaking during a media roundtable at the confab, said the service and Boeing were addressing the issue.

“We’re working … with them to solve this together and do it at an affordable price,” he said. “I haven’t seen anything to give me the indication it’s going to go beyond the slight delay.”

Niewald told reporters later that the issue has now been resolved and the fix required no hardware changes. He touted the benefits of digital engineering in helping to solve the issue.

“We went and fixed it before the first [engineering and manufacturing development] aircraft ever flies,” he said. “That shows how we’ve been able to use digital engineering to know where those uncertainties lie.”
 

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