T-X Trainer - Boeing T-7A Red Hawk

AeroFranz

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IIRC wing rock afflicted the Super Bug too. I think there was some physical fix implemented (which doesn't mean software was part of the solution too).
 

Mark Nankivil

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Do we know how it was shipped?
Air or sea?

The Saab parts for the demonstration aircraft were flown to the US. Probably the same for this example. Ultimately they'll be made in the US, and will likely be trucked between sites.
Saab plans on setting up a production facility in Indiana once the production contract was firmed up.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

Birdog357

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TomS

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Do we know how it was shipped?
Air or sea?

The Saab parts for the demonstration aircraft were flown to the US. Probably the same for this example. Ultimately they'll be made in the US, and will likely be trucked between sites.
Saab plans on setting up a production facility in Indiana once the production contract was firmed up.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
Do you know where in Indiana?

West Lafayette.

 

Birdog357

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Do we know how it was shipped?
Air or sea?

The Saab parts for the demonstration aircraft were flown to the US. Probably the same for this example. Ultimately they'll be made in the US, and will likely be trucked between sites.
Saab plans on setting up a production facility in Indiana once the production contract was firmed up.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
Do you know where in Indiana?

West Lafayette.

That's only 2 hours from me. That's pretty cool.
 

isayyo2

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Do we know how it was shipped?
Air or sea?

The Saab parts for the demonstration aircraft were flown to the US. Probably the same for this example. Ultimately they'll be made in the US, and will likely be trucked between sites.
Saab plans on setting up a production facility in Indiana once the production contract was firmed up.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
Do you know where in Indiana?

West Lafayette.

That's only 2 hours from me. That's pretty cool.
Hopefully they'll offer tours?
 

Sundog

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IIRC wing rock afflicted the Super Bug too. I think there was some physical fix implemented (which doesn't mean software was part of the solution too).
IIRC, they used a porous material at the hinge which allows air to flow from the high pressure low side to the low pressure top side. I don't know if it's acting as an aerodynamic fence to stop span wise flow or if it's just re-energizing the boundary layer airflow on the top of the wing to prevent separation in a critical area. Both?
 

UpForce

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From Finnish airshow me think.

Well, hello there. From Boeing's website: "The T-7A’s design includes provisions for growth as requirements evolve for additional missions such as an aggressor, light attack / fighter variant." Scant public information on this development from what I can tell from a rather cursory search, but that seems like a pretty specific loadout. Any more info on this?
 

fightingirish

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Is the designation "TF-7A" just for the Finnish proposal or also for a US proposal?
 

TomcatViP

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A potential new market for the T-7A albeit in an upgraded form:

The RFI said the aircraft sought will be used for initial tactical training, “adversary air support,” and as a “tactical fighter surrogate of existing and future” Air Force frontline fighters. The Air Force wants “feasibility, estimated cost, and schedule for at least 100” of these aircraft and as many as 200 more in lots of 50. The service wants a two-seat airplane “plus an option for a single seat” model with options to use the rear seat area for other mission gear.

The airplane sought would have capability for a speed of Mach 0.9 and be able to “replicate current and future fighter aircraft systems” by providing an embedded training environment to build “transferable skills, systems management skills, and decision-making skills” for weapons employment. The jet is to have a large cockpit display and one hardpoint on each wing to carry at least one Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation pod or a Combat Air Training Missile. The hardpoints also have to be able to carry an external fuel tank or an electronic attack or countermeasures pod or “other future pods.” Endurance is to be 90 minutes, of which 30 minutes would be “tactical maneuvering.” The jet is to have a ceiling of at least 45,000 feet and have a structural instantaneous G of 7.5, plus a sustained 6G maneuver.

The controls must have a “universal stick and throttle connection” to “enable reconfiguration of the flight controls to mimic Hands on Throttle and Stick of frontline” Air Force fighters.

 

GTX

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Official Saab page on T-7A:

 

GTX

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any news if Sweden plans to purchase any since Saab is one of the partners?
Officially the Saab 105s are expected to operate through to 2025 but one could probably reasonably assume that the T-7A will be seen in Flygvapnet sometime in the near future.
 

TomcatViP

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Boeing could adapt the the T-7A in accordance with USAF adversary trainer RFI:


Also FlightGlobal reports that wing rock problem is solved!
 

SgtGungHo

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I would never have guessed that the T-7 has only around 2000kg of fuel (1/3rd less than a Hawk)!
Well Its alternative LM/KAI T-50A has only about 2700kg of fuel (assuming that the aircraft's internal fuel capacity is the same as T-50). I am curious how much TAI Hurjet which is another trainer with F404 and said to have a longer range than T-50 could hold fuel internally.
Also FlightGlobal reports that wing rock problem is solved!
Could you share your link? This is an interesting development.
 

TomcatViP

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@SgtGungHo : Here it is:

 

SgtGungHo

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@SgtGungHo : Here it is:

Thanks mate, but I couldn't find any reference from the article saying that the wing rock issue is now solved. However, I could quickly find another flightglobal article reports that Boeing claims that the wing rock issue is fixed. So I assume the fix is not actually confirmed by the USAF nor Pentagon? I mean It is possible that I could have missed something since I couldn't access to the whole artice because of paywalls.
 

bring_it_on

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Thanks mate, but I couldn't find any reference from the article saying that the wing rock issue is now solved.

Boeing had developed a fix for that issue and added as part of the planned phased testing of the program. The flight test portion of that kicked off in the summer (late June / early July). Boeing seemed confident that it is past that issue, but the AF or the program will likely wait until it gets its hand on the EMD aircraft (the ones currently being built) and validates this. I think the prototypes (owned by Boeing) will soon be heading to Edwards, and the in-production EMD aircraft will be the ones that will really begin putting test cycles in so even i they have resolved this, it will likely be a few months to possibly a year before the AF signs off and officially retires the issue (that obviously doesn't mean that it hasn't been fixed already if Boeing feels it has based on testing it has done (since it's the only entity flying real aircraft at the moment).

From the Flight Global article:

Niewald also says that a ‘wing-rock’ issue discovered in mid-2021 has been resolved. In flights with the two T-7A prototypes, it was found that the wings tended to rock left and right at high angles of attack.

“We collected more data, were able to bring that down, model it, fly some updates in our manned hardware simulator to model our simulation efforts,” he says.

Following this work, a software fix was devised and loaded onto a test aircraft. A series of flights was conducted under different conditions to ensure the issue was resolved.

 
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