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Swearingen SA-28T ???

boxkite

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US magazine "Air Progress" from July 1969 (pg 19) described this display model as "Seven-place delta-wing transonic business jet designed by Swearingen Aircraft Co. will operate just under Mach 1 with Garrett turbofans."

I assume it's the SA-28T. Can anybody confirm this?
 

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hesham

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Dear boxkite,

it is wright,it was eight seat delta wing business jet aircraft,
project of 1971.
 

boxkite

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it is wright,it was eight seat delta wing business jet aircraft,
project of 1971.
... but released (for the first time?) in July 1969 ;)
 

hesham

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Yes boxkite,

but the aircraft was a supersonic in my source.
 

Jemiba

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I hope it's still visible: Published in Aviation Week, April 1969 !
 

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ChuckAnderson

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Hi Everyone!

Are there any 3-views available for the Swearingen SA-28T?

Chuck
 

Jemiba

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Just a quick attempt, landing gear drawn according to the description in AW 1969, hinge lines of
rudders and flaps just guess work, source grade 2.
And I didn't dare to add a scale without further clues for length and span.
 

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hesham

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Good work my dear Jemiba.
 

JSiragusa

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This was sent to me by an old engineer from Swearingen. This was the prototype transonic business jet that Swearingen was building. It was canceled when Fairchild purchased controlling interest in Swearingen Aircraft in 1975. According to him it was about 9 weeks away from flying. This picture was taken shortly before the project was canceled, the aircraft was scrapped not long after cancelation.
I was searching for more information on it which led me to this thread. After reading the thread I thought I'd share the picture here. You'll see the prototype shares a common fuselage with the Metroliner. This was Ed Swearingen's plan from the beginning of the Merlin/Metro program. He wanted to design a fuselage from which he could build several aircraft, his ultimate goal being this transonic business jet. It's a shame it didn't happen.
 

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Stargazer2006

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Sweet serendipity! Why Fairchild cancelled it is strange, but they completely mismanaged Hiller and Republic, so I'm not really surprised they also messed with Swearingen...
 

Kiltonge

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JSiragusa said:
This was Ed Swearingen's plan from the beginning of the Merlin/Metro program. He wanted to design a fuselage from which he could build several aircraft, his ultimate goal being this transonic business jet. It's a shame it didn't happen.
Now that is interesting and explains the swept tail configuration on the Merlin / Metro, which always seemed out of place on those aircraft and would make the stalling and spinning characteristics rather odd. But if it was also to operate at transonic speeds then it makes sense...

Edit: Did Fairchild take over in 1975 or 1971? If the latter then this design might have been an interim step to the full SA-28T.


Here's a little snippet of further info from Flight in 1970

A new advanced Collins flight control system is being developed for the
Swearingen Model SA28T transonic business jet.
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1970/1970%20-%200989.html
 

Kiltonge

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Best match I can find for the engines on JSiragusa's photo is the JT15D. I think the intake is too small in diameter for TFE731, big air-gulpers with twice the mass-flow.
 

JSiragusa

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I believe the engines mounted in the picture are CJ610s. I've read that the 610s were installed on the prototype during development and were to be used for the initial flight tests. I believe this was due to the 731s not being ready yet.
 

hesham

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JSiragusa said:
I believe the engines mounted in the picture are CJ610s. I've read that the 610s were installed on the prototype during development and were to be used for the initial flight tests. I believe this was due to the 731s not being ready yet.

May be you are right JSiragusa,that's because the aircraft developed in 1969,and the Garrett TFE731
was appeared in 1972.
 

VictorXL188

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Further to the above, in the 1971-72 Janes All The World's Aircraft, a GA drawing was reproduced of the redesigned SA 28T as it said in the text. As has been previously mentioned the Model SA28T was to be eventually powered by a pair of TFE731-1 turbofan engines. In the text in Janes it said that the design utilized many lessons gained from supersonic aircraft studies, which Swearingen had looked at in the 1960s. As well as the shoulder-mounted delta main wing, a delta tailplane of a slab variety was planned to be used. Although the first plans of the Model SA 28T had the engines mounted on the sides of the area-ruled fuselage and indeed the photo of the complete aircraft also shows this feature, it was reported in Janes that during wind tunnel tests these had caused excessive drag, hence an under-wing arrangement had been chosen. Also as a result of this wind-tunnel testing, the wing position had been changed from the bottom of the fuselage to the shoulder position, as seen in the attached GA drawing. With an MTOW of 13,500 lb (6123 kg) the seven-seat SA 28T was expected to have a top speed of around 575 mph (925 km/h), with an estimated range of around 2,300 miles (3700 km).
 

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hesham

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Great find Victor,many thanks.
 
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