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Space Station Concepts

Triton

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Artist's impression of McDonnell Douglas Science and Applications Space Platform (SASP) from 1980.

From NASA Images:
In the late 1970s, NASA, the Marshall Space Flight Center, and its contractors began focusing on designs for Shuttle-tended space platforms capable of extended periods in space and utilizing a variety of temporarily emplaced payloads. As a result, McDonnell Douglas studied the Science and Applications Space Platform (SASP). The emphasis was placed on payloads that did not require a crewman's presence during normal operations. Most of the payloads would occupy one or more Spacelab-like pallets. This artist concept depicts the SASP.

Source: http://www.nasaimages.org
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of Space Station Systems Analysis Study (SSSAS) space station concept from 1977.

From NASA Images:
The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) were each awarded 16-month contracts in April 1976 for the Space Station Systems Analysis Study (SSSAS). Grumman Aerospace Corporation was MSFC's contractor and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Company was JSC's contractor. The goal of this study was to formulate plans for a permanent operational base and laboratory facility in Earth orbit in addition to developing a space construction base design for implementing the program. An expended Space Shuttle external tank was to be the central core platform of the base, and additional pressurized modules could be added to provide laboratory facilities. This artist's concept depicts a space construction base design for implementing the SSSAS.
Source: http://www.nasaimages.org
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of Space Station Freedom from 1991.

From the Marshall Spaceflight Center website:
This artist's concept depicts the Space Station Freedom as it would look orbiting the Earth; illustrated by Marshall Space Flight Center artist, Tom Buzbee. Scheduled to be completed in late 1999, this smaller configuration of the Space Station features a horizontal truss structure that supported U.S., European, and Japanese Laboratory Modules; the U.S. Habitation Module; and three sets of solar arrays. The Space Station Freedom was an international, permanently manned, orbiting base to be assembled in orbit by a series of Space Shuttle missions that were to begin in the mid-1990's.

Sources:
http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1648
http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=1653
 

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Triton

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Langley engineer Rene A. Berglund examines a model of an inflatable space station concept (not his design). "While still in pursuit of the best possible inflatable torus, the NASA Langley space station group did explore other ideas. Most notably, in the summer of 1961 it entered into a six-month contract with North American Aviation for a detailed feasibility study of an advanced space station concept. Developed by Langley engineer Rene A. Berglund, the design called for a large modular manned space station, which although essentially rigid in structure, could still be automatically erected in space. In essence, Berglund's idea was to put together a series of six rigid modules that were connected by inflatable spokes or passageways to a central non rotating hub."

Source: http://lisar.larc.nasa.gov/UTILS/info.cgi?id=EL-2002-00325
 

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Triton

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Manned Space Laboratory Research. James Hansen wrote: "Langley built and tested various models of the Erectable Torus Manned Space Laboratory, including a full-scale research model constructed by Goodyear." The uninflated station was packed around a 24-foot diameter torus and could be launched inside a rocket. "The first idea for an inflatable station was the Erectable Torus Manned Space Laboratory. A Langley space station team led by Paul Hill and Emanuel "Manny" Schnitzer developed the concept with the help of the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation."

Source: http://lisar.larc.nasa.gov/UTILS/info.cgi?id=EL-2002-00355
 

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Triton

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Manned Space Laboratory Research. James Hansen wrote: "Testing indicated that the inflatable torus could be packaged around the hub so that it occupied only 2 percent of its inflated volume." "The first idea for an inflatable station was the Erectable Torus Manned Space Laboratory. A Langley space station team led by Paul Hill and Emanuel "Manny" Schnitzer developed the concept with the help of the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation."

Source:
http://lisar.larc.nasa.gov/UTILS/info.cgi?id=EL-2002-00356
 

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Triton

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From GalaxyWire:

A 1969 station concept. The station was to rotate on its central axis to produce artificial gravity. The majority of early space station concepts created artificial gravity one way or another in order to simulate a more natural or familiar environment for the health of the astronauts. This station was to be assembled on-orbit from spent Apollo program stages.

After returning from a micro-gravity environment, astronauts find their muscles weak because they have not been using them. Long-term exposure to micro-gravity could generate long-term health problems for astronauts who do not utilize their muscles. This is why there are exercise machines on the Shuttle and the International Space Station.

Source:
http://galaxywire.net/tag/nasa/page/8/
 

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Michel Van

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Thx for new pic, Triton

allot new stuff for me
 

Triton

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A 1977 concept drawing for a space station. Known as the "spider" concept, this station was designed to use Space Shuttle hardware. A solar array was to be unwound from the exhausted main fuel tank. The structure could then be formed and assembled in one operation. The main engine tank would then be used as a space operations control center, a Shuttle astronaut crew habitat, and a space operations focal point for missions to the Moon and Mars.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00095.html
 

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Triton

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This is the Johnson Space Center's 1984 "roof" concept for a space station. The "roof" was covered with solar array cells, that were to generate about 120 kilowatts of electricity. Within the V-shaped beams there would be five modules for living, laboratory space, and external areas for instruments and other facilities.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00096.html
 

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Triton

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This is a sketch of Skylab, as drawn by George E. Mueller, NASA associate administrator for Manned Space Flight. This concept drawing was created at a meeting at the Marshall Space Flight Center on August 19, 1966. The image details the station's major elements. In 1970, the station became known as Skylab. Three manned Skylab missions (Skylab 2 in May 1973; Skylab 3 in July 1973; and Skylab 4 in November 1973) were flown on which experiments were conducted in:space science, earth resources, life sciences, space technology, and student projects.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00097.html
 

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Triton

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Unlike many other early space station concepts, this design actually made it out of the concept phase and into production, though no models were ever flown. This particular station was 30-feet and expandable. It was designed to be taken to outer space in a small package and then inflate in orbit. The station could, in theory, have been big enough for 1 to 2 people to use for a long period of time. A similar 24 foot station was built by the Goodyear Aircraft Corporation for NASA test use. The concept of space inflatables was revived in the 1990s.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00106.html
 

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Triton

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This is a concept drawing of an orbit and launch facility. It was to use a nuclear SNAP-II nuclear power supply on the end of the long telescoping boom. Nuclear reactors were considered dangerous, which is why in this concept drawing it was located so far away from the habitat part of the station. Creators envisioned the structure being built in orbit to allow assembly of the station in orbit which could be then larger than anything that could be launched from Earth. The two main modules were to be 33 feet in diameter and 40 feet in length. When combined the modules would create a four deck facility, 2 decks to be used for laboratory space and 2 decks for operations and living quarters. The facility also allowed for servicing and launch of a space vehicle. Though the station was designed to operate in micro- gravity, it would also have an artificial gravity capability.

Source: http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00107.html
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of McDonnell-Douglas Space Station concept.

This McDonnell-Douglas concept drawing depicts a robotic arm controlled by an astronaut. The arm is being used to maneuver a new addition to the space station into place. The robotic arm was to have been essential to building the space station in orbit.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00110.html
 

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Artist's impression of early space station concept from 1959

An early space station concept drawing. The station was designed as a laboratory to study the physical and behavioral effects of prolonged space flight, and could have possibly been crewed by 50 people. This particular image appeared in the 1959 Space The New Frontier brochure produced by NASA.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00112.html
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of early space station concept from 1959.

This is an early space station concept drawing. The station was designed as a laboratory to study the physical and behavioral effects of prolonged space flight, and could have possibly been crewed by 5 people. This particular image appeared in the 1959 Space The New Frontier brochure produced by NASA.

Source:
http://grin.hq.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/GPN-2003-00113.html
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of Garrett AiResearch space station concept from 1961.

Source:
http://io9.com/5013464/a-vibrator+shaped-space-station-1961
 

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RanulfC

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Triton said:
Artist's impression of Garrett AiResearch space station concept from 1961.

Source:
http://io9.com/5013464/a-vibrator+shaped-space-station-1961
Anyone else look at that concept and suddenly get the feeling the guy floating around outside is desperatly looking for a way into the vehicle?

Randy
 

Triton

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Artist's depiction of McDonnell Douglas 33-Foot-Diameter Space Station Leading to a Space Base from 1969.

This picture illustrates a concept of a 33-Foot-Diameter Space Station Leading to a Space Base. In-house work of the Marshall Space Flight Center, as well as a Phase B contract with the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, resulted in a preliminary design for a space station in 1969 and l970. The Marshall-McDonnell Douglas approach envisioned the use of two common modules as the core configuration of a 12-man space station. Each common module was 33 feet in diameter and 40 feet in length and provided the building blocks, not only for the space station, but also for a 50-man space base. Coupled together, the two modules would form a four-deck facility: two decks for laboratories and two decks for operations and living quarters. Zero-gravity would be the normal mode of operation, although the station would have an artificial gravity capability. This general-purpose orbital facility was to provide wide-ranging research capabilities. The design of the facility was driven by the need to accommodate a broad spectrum of activities in support of astronomy, astrophysics, aerospace medicine, biology, materials processing, space physics, and space manufacturing. To serve the needs of Earth observations, the station was to be placed in a 242-nautical-mile orbit at a 55-degree inclination. An Intermediate-21 vehicle (comprised of Saturn S-IC and S-II stages) would have launched the station in 1977.
Source:
http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/abstracts.php?p=2178
 

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PMN1

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Anyone know what the 20-person expendable space station mentioned here could be?

http://nasawatch.com/archives/2010/08/should-congress.html
 

Michel Van

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PMN1 said:
Anyone know what the 20-person expendable space station mentioned here could be?

http://nasawatch.com/archives/2010/08/should-congress.html

that so called "Space Base"
huge space station build from big modules like this one

the crewsize went from 12 up to 48 persons
 

PMN1

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Michel Van said:
PMN1 said:
Anyone know what the 20-person expendable space station mentioned here could be?

http://nasawatch.com/archives/2010/08/should-congress.html

that so called "Space Base"
huge space station build from big modules like this one

the crewsize went from 12 up to 48 persons

Yes, but that doesn't look expendable.

Its been suggested on the NASA Spaceflight website that it was a typo and should have read Expandable - there is the 21 man Self Deploying Space Station.

http://www.astronautix.com/craft/selation.htm
 

Stargazer2006

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I remember this space station concept as being expandable, i.e. it was meant to be enlarged by adding extra modules as missions went along. I can't see the point of an expendable station, which would be sort of a use-it-then-dump-it kind of station, especially considering how long a station can stay in orbit and be used.
 

Michel Van

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i mean this Space Base (Rockwell Proposal of 1970)

build from 4-8 Big module (16.5 m long x10 mø, launch by Saturn V)
to form big Space Base with 48 to 50 men crew (supply by Space shuttle)
that "Y" is not MOL but two 50 kW nuclear reactor (Brayton cycle)
and yes they had counter-rotating artificial gravity arms with habitat for crew.
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression and drawing of Rockwell International space base concept.

Source via Marcus Lindroos:
http://www.space1999.net/catacombs/main/models/spacestn/w2mspacestn.html
 

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Triton

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Cutaway artist's impression of McDonnell Douglas space station concept. Cone at top is a nuclear reactor used to power the station.

Source via Marcus Lindroos:
http://www.space1999.net/catacombs/main/models/spacestn/w2mspacestn.html
 

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Triton

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Artist's impression of North American Rockwell "DC-3" (Shuttle Phase-A) (Concept-A) space shuttles with space base from 1969.

Source via Marcus Lindroos:
http://www.pmview.com/spaceodysseytwo/spacelvs/sld022.htm
 

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Michel Van

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Here nice PDF about Space Base Concept and AAP 1-4 mission aka Wet Orbital Workshop "Skylab"


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19730063332_1973063332.pdf
 

Graham1973

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Proposal to build a small space station around a 100kw power module.

 

hesham

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Here is in NASA report, the Grumman D186 (may be G-186),a design passive dampers for a
manned rotating space station.

Also in the reference of the report;

Project-202C proposal for a study of a control system for an erectable manned space
laboratory.

D-139 (may be G-139) proposal for a Model of an automatic Gas Jet damping and orientation
system suitable for a rotating manned space station.

D-182 (may be G-182) proposal for an Air Breath Inertial simulator.

PDR-312 proposal for feasibility study of a manned self-erecting space laboratory.

Project 330 (PDR-330) or may be G-330.


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19830073549_1983073549.pdf
 
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