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Raytheon Coyote interceptors

sferrin

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I wonder if they're modified for head-end ignition.
 

TomS

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I wonder if they're modified for head-end ignition.
Probably. Could they repurpose the ejection charge cup at the head end of the motor?

Amusingly, this motor seems to be sold out pretty much everywhere online. Raytheon buying out the available stock?
 

sferrin

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I wonder if they're modified for head-end ignition.
Probably. Could they repurpose the ejection charge cup at the head end of the motor?
That's what I'd think. Or just screw a new closure on the front end. (I think Aerotech's are threaded vs snap rings.)
 

SpudmanWP

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That's the first time I have seen a turbine intake done like that. Nice and simple
 

sferrin

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Wait, that's an interceptor? What for? Seems unnecessarily complex. (And slow.)
 

TomS

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It's a small UAV killer, basically.
 

Moose

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Wait, that's an interceptor? What for? Seems unnecessarily complex. (And slow.)
Loitering intercept for UAVs, though they're hoping to expand into other roles. It's not that complex, just looks a bit funky.
 

SpudmanWP

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Wait, that's an interceptor? What for? Seems unnecessarily complex. (And slow.)
Up to helicopters, per the vid. It is also a lot faster than Block 1.

The sign also says "C-RAM"

The Coyote Block 2 specifically features improved sensors and rocket motors to significantly increase maneuverability. Propulsion relies on one jet engine, deeply improving speed and loiter time to engage larger and further targets. The Block 2 variant will feature a maximum speed of 200 knots (370 km/h), compared to 70 knots (130 km/h) for the Block 1 variant, and an operational range of 10 to 15 km.
 

AN/AWW-14(V)

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Munitions manufacturer Raytheon is testing and evaluating a new version of its Coyote C-UAS - designated Block 3 - that is expected to introduce longer loiter and multiple payload capabilities to the tube launched system.

Coyote detects airborne threats based on its KRFS multi-mission radar providing rocket, artillery and mortar, sense and warn features with the development of a third iteration due to customer interest, though the company has not received a specific order to this point, according to Richard Harris, VP business development land warfare systems at Raytheon.
Block 1, Initially developed as an ISR platform, has since evolved to meet US Army C-UAS requirements and fight against category one and category two unmanned drones, while Block 2 was born from the service requesting a system to tackle larger category three systems.

The commencement of Block 3 tests overlap with the winding down of Block 2 tests in New Mexico, with the latter scheduled for deployment with the US Army next year.
'The unique thing about the Block 1 for example is that we send it out and have it attack incoming drone threats, but if it misses it re-attacks. As drones become more sophisticated and can become more evasive the coyote is pre-programmed to continue to hit its target,' Harris explained.

To date, the US Army has not made Coyote a programme of record, hindering Raytheon’s export ambitions, but Harris suggested that US allies are eager to order the system with export possibilities eased by a forthcoming US government national approval process ‘release decision’ that would trigger the opening of an export market to 20 international countries. On that basis, FMS sales could then proceed.

Harris added that he expected Coyote to have a first international customer before the Farnborough Air Show next year.
Initial operating capability of Howler, a US Army term for merging capabilities of Raytheon’s Ku-band RF system radar and Coyote, has now been confirmed by the service.

 

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An over engineered likely limited performance ie few intercepts while facing a swarm, money grab. This is like using a Hellfire to down a commerical drone. How about artillery shot to kill the swarm at its launch site?
 

DWG

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An over engineered likely limited performance ie few intercepts while facing a swarm, money grab. This is like using a Hellfire to down a commerical drone. How about artillery shot to kill the swarm at its launch site?
The threat now is single UAS. So a single interceptor works fine. And you'll find the issue with counter-battery is it normally depends on the other side launching first, to enable counter-battery radars etc to backtrack to the launch-site. This is why shoot and scoot is the preferred tactic.
 

jsport

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Interceptors which cost more than the commericial drone. That is fine. Swarms are suddenly out. The PLA sure doesnt think so.
 

bring_it_on

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This is available now and is in low rate production and they'll hit FRP later this year. Howler is forward deployed in theater and is being used right now. It can be mounted on both the MATV and the FMTV and can be integrated as a lower cost kinetic option when paired with Directed Energy (HEL and HPM) solutions that are also forward deployed or about to be forward deployed. Not all the threats it is capable of defeating cost a few dozen, or a few hundred dollars. Some cost a lot more and are more sophisticated. Between block 1 and 2 interceptors, the system can engage Group 1 through 3 UAS. Of course when paired with other directed energy options it will most likely be used against the more stressing of those threats which won't be the sub $1000 drones you can buy or build yourself using parts from Ebay.. Also, not all UAS threats come in swarms. A few drones can do a lot of damage when being used to provide ISR for artillery or other fires support duties. Yet others can carry grenades, mortars and other payloads that can inflict further damage. Not every C-UAS solutions need to defeat the "dozens - hundreds" swarms to be effective or be desired from an operator perspective.
 
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bring_it_on

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There are classes of drones that require a kinetic solution that is even cheaper than a Stinger PF. To think that it is not worth buying or developing if it costs more than a cheap commercial drone is quite absurd IMHO. You still need a low(er) cost kinetic option against Group 2 and 3 UAS's to layer along side your HEL, HPM and other EW efforts. There are troops currently forward deployed that face this threat right now. And not just US troops but also allies. There is a reason that this WS has been approved for FMS export within months of entering production (Block 2).
 

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Nice to see a gun more substantial than a 12.7mm! Is it a Bushmaster 25mm?

Regards
Pioneer
 

TomS

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Nice to see a gun more substantial than a 12.7mm! Is it a Bushmaster 25mm?

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Pioneer
M230 30mm, probably firing the new LW30 PROX proximity fuzed ammunition. Same ammo family as Apache.
 

Moose

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Good round for slow UAVs. Wouldn't want to shoot something that moves fast with it, but lobbing air burst munitions at UAVs doesn't require high performance.
 

bring_it_on

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That is a threat set that probably will be best countered by EW and HPM based solutions along with just more mobility and hardened defenses. Luckily that type of threat isn't represented at today's battlefield in the ME so we have a bit of time for those systems to mature, become more compact and powerful.
 

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Isn't it simpler to use something akin to APKWS?
 

TomS

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I'm not sure how much reflected laser energy you'd get off a small commercial drone.
 

Karstjager

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I think turbine engine -is ATJ 220sv 22kg.
 

jsport

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One could imagine entering a WWI manned aircraft like paradigm for UAS. Swarming semi-attritble armed UAS are the best answer against swarming semi-attritble armed UAS and like WWI missions like ISR, grd atk (especailly against swarm launch sites) and yes air superiority will creep into each UAS's required mission set. These craft will return and reload. This evolution of UAS will be back to capability including range, payload and network/sensor quality not disposability. Switchblade and Coyote have no place in this evolving paradigm.
 

shin_getter

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One could imagine entering a WWI manned aircraft like paradigm for UAS. Swarming semi-attritble armed UAS are the best answer against swarming semi-attritble armed UAS and like WWI missions like ISR, grd atk (especailly against swarm launch sites) and yes air superiority will creep into each UAS's required mission set.
WWI manned aircraft have better sensors, against slower and order of magnitude larger air vehicles. In WWI, ground attack was also limited in effectiveness. As manned aircraft speeds increase, sensors have been improved to enable interception. As ground attack capability increases, anti-aircraft weapons have also increased in applicable range.

At the scale of micro-air vehicles, the sensors are poor against air targets, air vehicles can potentially move fast while having even smaller signature, and ground attack is potentially more effective with expensive and vulnerable targets. It is looking like WWII Carrier duels before radar directed fighter interception: mostly about getting the first strike in. The ship target being order(s) of magnitude more expensive than aircraft also resulted in disposable use of the latter.

Once one puts in all the sensors to make CAP meaningful and enough support system to enable survivability, one could very well be scaled like conventional fighter aircraft.
 

timmymagic

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That is a threat set that probably will be best countered by EW and HPM based solutions along with just more mobility and hardened defenses.
Orbital ATK's teaming with of the M230 30mm cannon with Blighter AUDS radar, E/O and RF interruptor is a decent set up. Combine a mixture of Raytheon's system with Coyote, M230, Blighter AUDS AND Stinger and you'd have a very decent small anti-air platform. Would like to see more passive sensors like a modern Ferranti ADADs though. The radars could end up attracting swarms...

What surprises me is how no-one seems to have really started looking at IFV's as a mass air defence solution. Most IFVs these days have 30mm+ autocannons, with the majority now actively fielding or upgradeable to 35-40mm systems. That's where airburst and proximity fusing really makes sense. More and more IFV's also have RWS fitted and missile launchers attached for ATGM. Has enough attention been given to main armament slewing rates, fine adjustment and gun elevation though? Passive IIR sensors can provide cuing to targets without radars with their expense, power demands and RF emissions but they're noticeable by their absence. Same with RF interruptors which are comparatively cheap. Hard kill APS culd also play a part. So many parts of the solution are already there. In a future of swarming drones we're going to need a lot more shooters...
 
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bring_it_on

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There are many systems (like the Blighter) aimed at commercial and cheap drones. I believe the last time the DOD had a demonstration more than half a dozen systems showed up. However, going forward things will get harder and higher power HPM and HEL systems will likely need to stand guard, at least around fixed military infrastructure abroad. Other more portable EW and disruptive systems can probably make their way onto these platforms itself, like they do on the Stryker for example. As far as passive sensors, the DOD already has these sensors deployed and more EO/IR and other sensors are on offer as well.
 
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DWG

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Isn't it simpler to use something akin to APKWS?
Does APKWS have the kinematics to engage a manouevring target? It's basically a straight-line weapon with course-correction, rather than a dogfight weapon.
 

sferrin

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Isn't it simpler to use something akin to APKWS?
Does APKWS have the kinematics to engage a manouevring target? It's basically a straight-line weapon with course-correction, rather than a dogfight weapon.
I thought that thing got cancelled. (2.75" LG rocket.) :confused:
There was a laser-guided Zuni (5" rocket) as well but no idea if it ever went into production.
 

TomS

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Isn't it simpler to use something akin to APKWS?
Does APKWS have the kinematics to engage a manouevring target? It's basically a straight-line weapon with course-correction, rather than a dogfight weapon.
I thought that thing got cancelled. (2.75" LG rocket.) :confused:
There was a laser-guided Zuni (5" rocket) as well but no idea if it ever went into production.
The original APKWS was cancelled, but 70mm APKWS II is fielded and operational in fairly large numbers (tens of thousands of rounds procured).

 

bring_it_on

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But it is still laser guided even for this application?
 

TomS

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But it is still laser guided even for this application?
APKWS is always laser, AFAIK. But I'm not sure it's actually viable for the same sorts of targets as Coyote. They may be too small for it.

The USAF has demoed APKWS against cruise missile type targets, though.

 
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