AeroFranz said:
SOC, the chemical in question was said to be rather 'nasty' in composition (you can probably find the name of the compound, it wasn't secret AFAIK), and was (allegedly) replaced operationally by a small camera pointing aft to keep an eye on contrails. If these are actually formed, the pilot changes altitude until these disappear.
The bays formerly used to hold the chemicals are now considered for use with new systems.
Getting back to answering after being away for a while. Not only was the compound rather "nasty" by itself, but the results of mixing it with water resulted in other nasty compounds in vapor form. ::chuckle:: When I first heard what the compound was, I did the chemical equations just to what would result; nasty stuff to put into the air.
 
saintkatanalegacy said:
sure can't see the trail from here...

regarding chlorosulfonic acid:
it has a specific heat of 1.18 kJ/kgK compared to water which has 4.187 kJ/kgK
it has a heat of vaporization of 452-460 kJ/kg compared to water which has 2270 kJ/kg

hence, it can absorb heat faster than most compounds which makes it ideal for shroud IR signature dissipation

:)


There are million IR pictures from different plant where you cant see any trail...actually there is one picture where you can se the B2 with the exhaust engine traile.


Depends on which frecuency are you picking up in the picture.
 
Almost four years after mishap, no sign of AIB report...hmm.
 
http://www.spacemart.com/reports/Northrop_Grumman_to_Demonstrate_Faster_Simpler_Way_to_Replace_Obsolete_Parts_for_B2_Bomber_999.html
 
[size=12pt]SHE HAS ARISEN
The Spirit of Washington Returns to Duty
Steve Pace

On 26 February 2010 a B-2 flying wing stealth bomber was preparing to fly a mission from Anderson Air Force Base on Guam when one of its four engines caught fire. The ensuing fire caused major damage to the engine bay and the affected side of the air vehicle before it was extinguished. Since this particular B-2 is just one of only 20 operational B-2s assigned to the Air Combat Command of the U.S. Air Force her repair was imperative.
The island of Guam is U.S. Territory located some 6,000 miles from the Northrop Grumman facility in Palmdale, California where the airplane needed to be for its complete overhaul. So she had to be adequately repaired to flight status on Guam before this ‘wounded warrior’ could be flown to Palmdale.
The B-2 that was so badly burned in this horrendous fire was number 0332 – the Spirit of Washington of the 509th Bomb Wing, which had first been delivered to the USAF on 29 October 1994 and subsequently took up residency at Whiteman AFB, Missouri – the home base of all B-2s.
In most cases, when an air vehicle suffers a catastrophic ground accident such as this, it is sent to a regeneration facility to be stripped of its salvageable equipment with the rest of it recycled. But this is when there are numerous aircraft in a fleet. In this case however, where only 20 fleet aircraft are available, it became imperative to save this disfigured B-2 and return her to full mission-ready status. It became time to devise a way to do this because the mission of the B-2 is specific and vastly important to national security and all 20 of the B-2s in the fleet are needed to implement it.
It was decided to make 0332 airworthy once again at Anderson AFB and then fly her from Guam to Palmdale for her complete refurbishment and return to operational duty. This had to be done before the beginning of Fiscal Year 2012 and was accomplished two months early.
Then after three years and nine months of refurbishment and modernization the Spirit of Washington was ready to be returned to her rightful home in Missouri. After flying from the Northrop Grumman () facility in Palmdale to Whiteman AFB on 16 December 2013, the Spirit of Washington landed where she was returned to the B-2 fleet. On the very next day Northrop Grumman and the USAF Air Combat Command celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first B-2 delivery on 17 December 1993 when the Spirit of Missouri arrived.

Just a little info I gathered -SP
[/size]
 
http://www.dodbuzz.com/2014/06/25/b-2-bomber-set-to-receive-massive-upgrade/
 
DSE said:
Pilot Report: Aviation Week Flies The Northrop Grumman B-2 (1995) | From The Archives

"During our two-day stay at the Missouri air base, the personnel of the 509th Bomb Wing gave us excellent access. We were able to survey the aircraft close up, except for the engine exhaust area".

This is something we've heard elsewhere, I wonder what is being concealed? At first glance, there are no obvious clues here:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,877.msg116813.html#msg116813
 
That was 20 years ago. Whatever they were concealing at the time, the fact that there are newer photos of the exhaust area suggest it's not as sensitive anymore.

The F-117 had similar restrictions early in its airshow career, but they were lifted later on, IIRC.
 
Exhaust pipes, for example. Another technical marvel hidden in its personal bays. Rear end of complicated secondary air flow system labyrinth. etc.
Note interesting caption for B-2 photo on article first page, BTW.
 
TomS said:
The F-117 had similar restrictions early in its airshow career, but they were lifted later on, IIRC.

Correct. I managed to get right behind the F-117A at the 1991 Paris Air Show, climb on a barrier for a bit of elevation and take a couple of rear end pics, but I knew it was risky business... I took advantage of the imminent closing of the gates when the aircraft were no longer attended... The photos have remained in my album to this date.
 
TomS said:
That was 20 years ago. Whatever they were concealing at the time, the fact that there are newer photos of the exhaust area suggest it's not as sensitive anymore.

I understand that the exhaust area is still somewhat sight sensitive.
You are correct that photos from the rear quarter exist (see flateric's finds on the discussion I previously linked) those photos however, don't show anything of note, just black holes upstream of the trenches.
I would imagine what is/was being concealed is further up the exhaust system

flateric said:
Exhaust pipes, for example. Another technical marvel hidden in its personal bays. Rear end of complicated secondary air flow system labyrinth. etc.

FWIW my assumption is there is some kind of baffles / labyrinthe mixing system to mix hot exhaust with cooler air.
I do understand that just because something is secret does not mean it is revolutionary (for example, B-52's swiveling landing gear http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/this-video-shows-that-you-dont-fly-a-b-52-you-wrestle-i-1678846593)
 
Mat Parry said:
DSE said:
Pilot Report: Aviation Week Flies The Northrop Grumman B-2 (1995) | From The Archives

"During our two-day stay at the Missouri air base, the personnel of the 509th Bomb Wing gave us excellent access. We were able to survey the aircraft close up, except for the engine exhaust area".

This is something we've heard elsewhere, I wonder what is being concealed? At first glance, there are no obvious clues here:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,877.msg116813.html#msg116813

Not the exhausts per se, but the rear deck area for deployable antennae or other retractable systems I thought?....
 
Hi!
 

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  • B-2 CUTAWAY.jpg
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While it looks cool, it's VERY inaccurate
 
Mr London 24/7 said:
Not the exhausts per se, but the rear deck area for deployable antennae or other retractable systems I thought?....
DMS retractable antenna doors (top and bottom ones) are in the other places.
 
I've read elsewhere that no photo is allowed to be taken within twenty five feet of the rear of the B-2 when it's on the ground. Is this still true and has it ever been true?
 
This clip shows the precise fit of the rotating in-flight fuel receptacle. Neat-O.
This video shows the precise fit of the rotating in-flight fuel receptacle. Neat-O.


https://youtu.be/77G8NZv4kY8
 
http://teamafrl.afciviliancareers.com/sites/default/files/documents2/TM_CompositeMaterialSkins_RX-10-34_08-03.pdf
 
bobbymike said:
http://teamafrl.afciviliancareers.com/sites/default/files/documents2/TM_CompositeMaterialSkins_RX-10-34_08-03.pdf

Back in 2010....
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123229059
 
Air Force Upgrades Weapons, Radios for B-2 Stealth Bomber.

http://defensetech.org/2015/05/14/air-force-upgrades-weapons-communications-for-b-2-stealth-bomber/
 
This B-2 shot from him is amazing ..

http://www.chadslattery.com/In-the-Air/1
 
PaulMM (Overscan) said:
Initially, there was no low level penetration requirement, but it was added during development, necessitating major structural and aerodynamic changes.

I believe the low level capability was added "just in case".

Seems I read that low level was added with the collapse of the SU.
 
At a guess, widespread deployment of SA-10.
 
NeilChapman said:
That would make sense because the decision was made in the 80's. So why was the mission profile changed?

The evaluation of the contractors’ proposals proceeded on site at the contractors’ facilities throughout December 1980, through January and into February 1981. The Source Selection Advisory Council (SSAC) received regular briefings on the progress of the evaluation and the outcome of the ongoing survivability assessment. The SSAC concluded that growth provisions for low altitude capability would be a prudent hedge against an ever-changing and maturing radar threat operational throughout the Soviet Union. Accordingly, a Modification Request to the RFP was issued in April 1981 to request a study for the impact on the design to include a significant low altitude penetration capability, beyond the fallout capability from the high altitude designs.
 
quellish said:
NeilChapman said:
That would make sense because the decision was made in the 80's. So why was the mission profile changed?

The evaluation of the contractors’ proposals proceeded on site at the contractors’ facilities throughout December 1980, through January and into February 1981. The Source Selection Advisory Council (SSAC) received regular briefings on the progress of the evaluation and the outcome of the ongoing survivability assessment. The SSAC concluded that growth provisions for low altitude capability would be a prudent hedge against an ever-changing and maturing radar threat operational throughout the Soviet Union. Accordingly, a Modification Request to the RFP was issued in April 1981 to request a study for the impact on the design to include a significant low altitude penetration capability, beyond the fallout capability from the high altitude designs.

Thank you TomS -

Thank you quellish -
 
The Culinary Institute may have been involved.

http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-NOTAM-230408-1.html

55Zh6 was developed in the 1980s, with the designer getting a State prize in 1987.
 
Air Force seeks new-start authority to arm B-2 with long-range, stealthy cruise missile

The Air Force is asking Congress for funds to arm the B-2 stealth bomber with a long-range variant of the service's supersonic, stealthy cruise missile -- pairing two of the U.S. military's most advanced offensive capabilities to give policy makers the option to attack high-value targets during the early stages of a campaign.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sorry if I missed the story there's a 'supersonic' stealthy cruise missile out there? Something has been built from those Mach 3 turbines?
 
Wasn't the stealthy AGM-129 ACM(Advanced Cruise Missile) retired years ago? Would having a classified non-acknowledged super-sonic nuclear cruise missile in service be a violation of START/START II?
 

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