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NASA Space Launch System (SLS)

Michel Van

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Archibald said:
This frankeinrocket will never die.
SLS is not the only one, we have Angara also with turbulent history !
Angara program started in 1992, 22 years later the first suborbital launch took place
(despite the South Koreans teste it three times as Naro-1 )
Finally in December 23, 2014 the Angara 5 made it first launch of Mass simulator into GTO
and then...

...Nothing !
current launch date for Second Angara is for 2019.
 

Michel Van

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Rhinocrates said:
Bob Zimmerman thinks that it will be launched a couple of times, victory will be declared and then it will fall by the wayside, like Energiya:

I think that will happen this way
Since Russians suddenly pushing the Soyuz-5 as new multi-use rocket, instead of Khrunichev Angara
Soyuz-5 has to replace the Ukraine build Zenit-2 and medium Proton by Khrunichev
Also the Option for Soyuz-5 become a super heavy launcher with a 80~160 tons into LEO
Another indications is that decision, not to launch Angara A3 and Angara A5 from Vostochny.
 

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Launch Abort! What Happens Next? NASA Scientists Figure Out the Flow to Keep Astronauts Safe


The visualization shows an ascent abort scenario that is triggered as the vehicle is traveling at close to the speed of sound. Starting at abort initiation with motor ignition, the video slows down when the pressure and air flow conditions are particularly harsh. Colored plumes indicate high pressure (red) and low pressure (blue). Each pixel changing from blue to red (and vice versa) over time is related to pressure waves that cause vibrations on the vehicle (white). Regions where the color changes abruptly in space, but stays constant in time, indicate the presence of shock waves.
Credits: NASA/Ames/Timothy Sandstrom


Think back on your favorite movies about astronauts and space travel: The dramatic launch countdown, the billowing plumes and flames as the rocket engines fire up and the vehicle lifts off, the rumble and roar inside the crew capsule. A launch is dramatic not only because of its breathtaking spectacle, but also because it's one of the most complex parts of flight – and one of the most likely places for something to go wrong.
In real life, NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) research scientists, at the agency’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, are producing highly detailed simulations and visualizations to help keep astronauts safe during the dynamic liftoff conditions of NASA’s Orion spacecraft, which will send humans to the Moon and potential future destinations, and return them safely back to Earth.

The NAS scientists’ advanced simulation techniques are being used to predict vibrations on the Orion spacecraft’s Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV). The LAV is the combined configuration of the Orion launch abort system and crew module. The LAV is designed to pull the crew away from peril if an emergency occurs on the launch pad or during the first two minutes of flight.

This visualization supports the Orion LAV motor design effort, a collaboration between NASA and Orion prime contractor Lockheed Martin. It shows an ascent abort scenario that is triggered as the vehicle is traveling at close to the speed of sound. The video starts at abort initiation with motor ignition.

The video slows down when the pressure and air flow conditions are particularly harsh. Colored plumes indicate high pressure (red) and low pressure (blue). Each pixel changing from blue to red (and vice versa) over time is related to pressure waves that cause vibrations on the vehicle (white). Regions where the color changes abruptly in space, but stays constant in time, indicate the presence of shock waves.

These simulations of Orion’s pad abort and ascent abort scenarios, run on the Pleiades supercomputer, are directly impacting the spacecraft’s design to increase astronaut safety and reduce uncertainty while keeping cost and launch abort vehicle weight down.

For more technical information about the Orion launch abort simulations, visit:

 

Flyaway

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NASA may fly humans on the less powerful version of its deep-space rocket

NASA may make some big changes to the first couple flights of its future deep-space rocket, the Space Launch System, after getting a recent funding boost from Congress to build a new launch platform. When humans fly on the rocket for the first time in the 2020s, they might ride on a less powerful version of the vehicle than NASA had expected. If the changes move forward, it could scale down the first crewed mission into deep space in more than 45 years.
Modifying these first flights is only possible now thanks to an unexpected influx of cash that NASA got from the recent 2018 spending bill. The space agency received an extra $350 million to build a second launch platform for the SLS. And it’s giving NASA more flexibility in how it conducts the first few missions of the rocket.
Meanwhile, it’s also possible that the second flight of the SLS won’t carry crew at all. NASA also needs to launch its upcoming mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa pretty soon. Known as Europa Clipper, the mission is mandated by Congress to fly on the SLS by 2022. Lightfoot mentioned that Europa Clipper could come before the first crewed flight of the SLS. It just depends on if the Orion crew capsule, which will carry astronauts on the SLS, is ready before Europa Clipper is ready. If the Europa spacecraft comes first, then it could also fly on the small Block 1 rocket.

Overall, Lightfoot hammered home to Congress that NASA has many different options now: “It allows us to have the ability to fly SLS when we’re ready with whatever payload is ready to go.”
 

Michel Van

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SLS is connected to Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway program

A manned space station installed between Earth and Moon
Original plan was that SLS would launch 6 parts of Lunar Orbital Platform to destination, follow by Supply and Orions flights by SLS
Now it seem that its down to three SLS launches and 3 launches of commercial rocket and seems the resupply mission also

Note: SpaceX BFR could launch entire Lunar Orbital Platform in one launch to destination



source:
RussianSpaceWeb.com
Anatoly Zak
 

Flyaway

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NASA budgeting reveals dim hopes for humans going to Mars

When it comes to spaceflight, there are crazy optimistic schedules like those that SpaceX CEO Elon Musk sometimes tosses about, and then there's just plain crazy. Some recent comments from the chief executive of Boeing, an aerospace company that simultaneously holds the most lucrative contracts in NASA’s exploration, International Space Station, and commercial crew programs, seem to fall into the latter category.

Speaking at a recent forum about NASA’s plans to send humans to Mars, Boeing’s Dennis Muilenburg offered his own opinion. "I anticipate that we will put the first person on Mars in my lifetime,” he said. “I think in this decade, and the first person that gets there is going to be on a Boeing rocket."
 

zaphd

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Michel Van said:
Note: SpaceX BFR could launch entire Lunar Orbital Platform in one launch to destination
Slightly off topic, but that seems a bit optimistic based on the 2017 BFR numbers. The guys on the nasaspaceflight forum have estimated it can do around 20 tons (optimistically) to geostationary transfer, and lunar orbit is yet another ~1.7 km/s farther. Now with one or two LEO refuelings it could do it in a breeze (provided it gets built first).
 

Michel Van

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According Anatoly Zak
has NASA revise the Gateway station launch sequence
this time four SLS launches and three Commercial launches...

 

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That version has a second Hab and 2 airlocks, is this a new baseline or an expanded-capabilities study?
 

Flyaway

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NASA adding more SLS Block 1 launches to manifest

With two more launches of the Block 1 version of the Space Launch System now planned, NASA is starting work to procure and human-rate additional upper stages.

NASA originally expected to fly the Block 1 version of the SLS only once before moving to the more powerful Block 1B version of the rocket. The Block 1 uses an upper stage known as the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), based on the Delta 4 upper stage. The Block 1B will replace the ICPS with the Exploration Upper Stage, a larger upper stage under development.

However, with funding from Congress provided in the fiscal year 2018 omnibus appropriations bill to build a second mobile launch platform, NASA now expects to use the Block 1 version more than once. Those additional launches can take place using the existing mobile launch platform while the new one, designed for Block 1B, is built. That move is designed to reduce concerns about a long gap between SLS missions had NASA gone through with original plans to modify the mobile launch platform after the first SLS mission so it could be used for the Block 1B.
 

Grey Havoc

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Grey Havoc said:
 

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RS-25 Engine Installed On Stennis Space Center Stand For New Test Series

Aerojet Rocketdyne developmental RS-25 engine No. 0525 is readied for installation on the A-1 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on July 23 in preparation for another new hotfire series to support NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) Program. Stennis is testing all RS-25 engines that will help power the SLS rocket, which is being built for missions beyond low-Earth orbit, carrying crew and cargo to the Moon and beyond. Four RS-25 engines, working in conjunction with a pair of solid rocket boosters, will power the SLS rocket at launch. The initial RS-25 engines are former space shuttle main engines, modified to provide the additional thrust needed for the larger, heavier SLS rocket.

Originally designed more than 40 years ago to provide a specific power level categorized as 100 percent thrust, the RS-25 version of the space shuttle main engine has been upgraded to operate at 111 percent of its original power. NASA has been testing RS-25 modifications and flight engines at Stennis since January 2015 in preparation for the Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1) and Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2) flights of SLS. EM-1 will test the capabilities of the new rocket and will carry an uncrewed Orion spacecraft into space beyond the moon. EM-2 will be the first flight to carry humans aboard the Orion spacecraft, returning astronauts to deep space for the first time in more than 40 years.

The next series of tests at Stennis is scheduled to begin mid-August. For the test, a new flight controller component will be installed on the RS-25 developmental engine and fired just as during an actual launch. The new flight controller is a major part of the RS-25 modifications, operating as the “brain” of the engine to help it communicate with the SLS rocket and to provide precision control of engine operation and internal health diagnostics. A total of 10 hot fires are scheduled for the test series, seven by the end of 2018 and three in the early part of 2019. Each will feature a flight controller that will be used on an actual SLS mission.

Each RS-25 test moves the agency closer and closer to its return to deep space exploration, to such destinations as the Moon and Mars. In addition to testing RS-25 engines and components for SLS flights, Stennis is preparing to test the actual core stage that will be used on the EM-1 mission. NASA has been modifying the B-2 Test Stand at Stennis for the core stage testing. The testing will involve installing the flight stage on the B-2 Test Stand and firing all four of its RS-25 engines simultaneously, as during a launch.

RS-25 tests at Stennis are conducted by a team of NASA, Aerojet Rocketdyne and Syncom Space Services engineers and operators. Aerojet Rocketdyne is the RS-25 prime contractor. Syncom Space Services is the prime contractor for Stennis facilities and operations.

 

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Could November elections scramble a controversial U.S. mission to a frozen moon?

Earlier this year, planetary scientists got a pleasant surprise: a big boost in NASA’s budget, instituted at the direction of Representative John Culberson (R–TX), a leading member of the House of Representatives spending panel. But some of that money—$195 million, to be exact—came with a catch. It had to be spent on a robotic mission to land on Europa, Jupiter’s frozen moon, to search for signs of life.
 

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NASA inspector general sharply criticizes SLS core stage development

The report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that Boeing had done a poor job managing development of the core stage of the SLS while NASA did insufficient oversight of that contract, resulting in a doubling of the program’s costs and delays of several years.

“We found Boeing’s poor performance is the main reason for the significant cost increases and schedule delays to developing the SLS Core Stage,” the OIG report stated. “Specifically, the Project’s cost and schedule issues stem primarily from management, technical, and infrastructure issues directly related to Boeing’s performance.”
 

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Flyaway said:
NASA inspector general sharply criticizes SLS core stage development

The report by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that Boeing had done a poor job managing development of the core stage of the SLS while NASA did insufficient oversight of that contract, resulting in a doubling of the program’s costs and delays of several years.

“We found Boeing’s poor performance is the main reason for the significant cost increases and schedule delays to developing the SLS Core Stage,” the OIG report stated. “Specifically, the Project’s cost and schedule issues stem primarily from management, technical, and infrastructure issues directly related to Boeing’s performance.”
This is one of those places where the near-complete abdication of its oversight role by the recent/present Congress really tells.
 

Michel Van

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Flyaway said:

why, i not surprised by that News ?

It make sense, since SpaceX and Blue Origin and others working on Big Boosters. Faster, better, cheaper as NASA SLS,
what is obsolete, expensive, far behind schedule and Budget and fighting for meaning to be
let's take Lunar Gateway original it's launch exclusive by SLS, now it's down to Manned Flights, while SpaceX, Blue Origin, ULA do unmanned launches...

I always made Jokes that NASA astronauts will end up as front-seat passenger on spacecraft of SpaceX of Blue Origin on way to Moon and Mars
now it become a realty
 

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Grey Havoc

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Flyaway

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NASA budget proposal targets SLS

The White House’s fiscal year 2020 budget request for NASA proposes to delay work on an upgraded version of the Space Launch System and would transfer some of that vehicle’s payloads to other rockets.

The proposal, released by the Office of Management and Budget March 11, offers a total of $21 billion for the space agency, a decrease of $500 million over what Congress appropriated in the final fiscal year 2019 spending bill signed into law Feb. 15.
 

merriman

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High time NASA got out of the hardware business and leave the practical aspects of transportation to businesses that are not married to vote-grabbing, technically stupid, self-involved, lawyer trained swamp dwellers.

Die, SLS. Die!

David
 

sferrin

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merriman said:
High time NASA got out of the hardware business and leave the practical aspects of transportation to businesses that are not married to vote-grabbing, technically stupid, self-involved, lawyer trained swamp dwellers.

Die, SLS. Die!

David
It ain't called the Senate Launch System for nothin'. I could see the .gov wanting to retain launch capability, I just wish there was a way to keep it from being a pork project. We've seen companies refuse service for a variety of SJW, virtue-signalling BS reasons and it would really suck if US access to space were held hostage that way.
 

Michel Van

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Flyaway said:
NASA budget proposal targets SLS

The White House’s fiscal year 2020 budget request for NASA proposes to delay work on an upgraded version of the Space Launch System and would transfer some of that vehicle’s payloads to other rockets.

The proposal, released by the Office of Management and Budget March 11, offers a total of $21 billion for the space agency, a decrease of $500 million over what Congress appropriated in the final fiscal year 2019 spending bill signed into law Feb. 15.
Why i not surprised ?
The numbers of Payloads for SLS dwindles.
And planned SLS Payload end up on Falcon Heavy and New Glenn and SpaceX build Starship.
If NASA kills SLS & Orion they get 3 billion Dollar for Other programs,
And with SpaceX, Blue Origin and ULA has USA a flourish private Space Industry, that offers low-cost launches.
 

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It is probably going to take another Augustine Commission to kill the SLS. The pork bellies backing it have too much pull. Hopefully, the cost per launch may finally be seriously debated whenever it gets to the pad and then maybe some consideration will be given to whether it is worth it. As it is, block I winds up bigger and heavier than Saturn V but with just 60% of the payload capacity. The budget to extend performance to block II with the attendant impact on launch cost may have forced a reckoning on financial limitations.
 

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It seems that with "Falcon Heavy" already available and the possibility of getting "Starship" up and running, the US government is reluctant to spend on superheavy booster which might get obsolete in just a few years.
 

Dilandu

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Michel Van said:
If NASA kills SLS & Orion they get 3 billion Dollar for Other programs,
The "Orion" seems to be the only current US spacecraft designed for prolonged autonomous missions. As far as I know, both "Dragon 2" and "Starliner" were designed for short-duration missions, unless docked with space station. I think it is possible to provide them with additional habitable modules (like our Russian "Soyuz" spacecraft, which have separate orbital module), though.
 

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Dilandu said:
It seems that with "Falcon Heavy" already available and the possibility of getting "Starship" up and running, the US government is reluctant to spend on superheavy booster which might get obsolete in just a few years.
And yet, they're still spending billions on it. If the move here is "SLS is irrelevant/unaffordable/whatever and SpaceX, B-O, etc can get our stuff up there anyway," then kill the darned thing. Instead, we're seeing them try to split the baby: keep the jobs program going while skimming off the top that which just so happens to make SLS useful for deep space missions. This is late-program DDG-1000 thinking all over again, the "well it's too expensive even though it's very capable so let's make it less expensive and less capable by lopping bits off and hope nobody notices it's now a worse value than if we had just stayed the course."
 

Dilandu

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Well, DDG-1000 at lest gave a major boost in numerous naval tech areas, providing valuable foundation for future warship designs. And, it is still the best among most of large surfce combatnts.

The SLS, though, is not much of technologicl boost, since it is based on Shuttle hardware rather heavily. And it is... conservative design.
 

Archibald

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What payloads ? SLS never had any payloads, bar Orion. Unless of course powerpoint count as a payload.
 

Michel Van

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Archibald said:
What payloads ? SLS never had any payloads, bar Orion. Unless of course powerpoint count as a payload.
In the begin SLS had allot of Payload
manned Luna orbiter and manned Luna Lander
Ames proposal for Gigant space Telescope
A Probe for Jupiter later Europa Clipper Orbiter
Not sure about a Deep space Mission to Pluto and Mars Sample return mission.

But then the Upper stage engine for SLS Block 2 (130 tons payload) were canceled and Orion got ATV as Service module
Bye bye manned Luna orbiter and manned Luna Lander, since Orion/ATV could only do lunar fly by...
Ames proposal was in conflict with James Webb Space Telescope
And at NASA people look for cheaper way to launch Europa Clipper, guess what SpaceX presented Falcon Heavy ;D

Then during that Crisis pop up Lunar Gateway Station as Successor of ISS
a Space Station parked between Earth and the Moon (little bit closer to that one)
Launch in 9~12 pieces by SLS and visit by Orion/ATV every 6 months for short stay

Guess what NASA people look for cheaper way to launch it and found SpaceX - Blue Origin - ULA
and now SLS is down to Manned Orion/ATV every 6 months for short stay once Lunar Gateway is operational
but time is running out, because Boeing/ULA and SpaceX manned capsule will fly manned into space.
putting question on need of Orion/ATV
For moment NASA rush to launch SLS Block1 with Orion/ATV for two missions

And SpaceX is building Starship and that's works do NASA still need SLS ?

years i'm joking about that NASA astronauts will be backseat drivers on space missions at SpaceX and Blue Origin
Seem it will become a realty...
 

Dilandu

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Michel Van said:
years i'm joking about that NASA astronauts will be backseat drivers on space missions at SpaceX and Blue Origin
Seem it will become a realty...
A probability, yes. While currently Space-X doesn't seems to be working on "Dragon-2" further development (their resources are pulled into Starship), I suspect it wouldn't be particularly hard to develop detachable "Orbital module" for "Dragon-2"
- like the one, our Russian "Soyuz"-class spacecrafts have.
 
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