• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Manned "Cloudbase" in Venus Atmosphere

Dilandu

I'm dissatisfied, which means, I exist.
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
802
Reaction score
361
Website
fonzeppelin.livejournal.com
Sounds like an improbable mix of Hindenburg Zeppelin and Bigelow modules. Wait... It just dawned on me. If a BA330 or BA2100 was filled with breathable air and dropped inside Venus atmosphere, would it FLOAT, the damn thing ???!!!
In short - yes. They would float, and even float at the altitude, when the pressure and temperature are close enough to Earth. Albeit I would prefer something like Cloud Nine tensegrity sphere.
 

Zeppelin

CLEARANCE: Confidential
Joined
May 29, 2009
Messages
82
Reaction score
9
On lifting from any aerostat platform back into orbit, launching/releasing conventional rocket powered transports would seem fraught. Thinking about those mining proposals and potential engineering challenges using tethered scoops to the surface. Has any thought been given, to have tethers to higher orbiting platforms? There has always been those earth to space cable ride proposals. How much would such a lesser distance tethered ride pose from any Venus atmosphere buoyant platform to the some higher orbital station?
 

Archibald

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
3,992
Reaction score
1,568
Well from the moment a floating city or venus balloon can lift 20 mt to 200 mt, then it can lift an orbital launch vehicle.
Black Arrow for the smallest satellite launch vehicle, but manned craft needs at least 3 mt (think Gemini) which translates as a 100 - 300 mt booster.
Then again, since Landis is telling us a 1-km wide balloon could lift 700 000 mt... plenty enough for chemical rockets. Heck, plenty enough for a nuclear pulse Orion.
 

Dilandu

I'm dissatisfied, which means, I exist.
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
802
Reaction score
361
Website
fonzeppelin.livejournal.com
Black Arrow for the smallest satellite launch vehicle, but manned craft needs at least 3 mt (think Gemini) which translates as a 100 - 300 mt booster.
Nah. You are making a mistake here: manned surface-to-orbit craft that did not need to LAND, would be much lighter than Gemini. Simply because it does not need to have heat shield, or survive the re-entry forces. It could ride out of atmosphere under the rocket's fairing, which would then just be detached. It could be made very-very lightweight and compact, maybe even without proper life support system (if it would meet with orbiting spaceship fast enough, we could just put crew into spacesuits, and use their own life support).

Essentially what you need to took off from Venus to orbit - is small, solid-fueled booster, like, for example, original Minotaur-I rocket (which weighted about 36 tons and was able to boost 0,5 ton to orbit). Such small booster could be delivered from Earth in launch container, equipped with heat shield & use parachutes and propulsive landing to dock with the floating base. When the crew would need to return to orbit, they would board the launch capsule on top of the booster & use it to boost themselves to the orbit - where they would meet the orbiting return spacecraft.
 
Top