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Luftwaffe: Secret Projects of the Third Reich by Dan Sharp

newsdeskdan

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Interesting that BMW, which produced the report 'Der Einbau des PTL-Geraets BMW 028' (EZS Bericht Nr. 48 EZV Nr. 592/44) in July 1944, was included on the recipient list of a report of November 27, 1943, by the LFA's Theodor Zobel (entitled 'Ein Weg zur Leistungssteigerung von Schnellflugzeugen') which included drawings like this:

Zobel.jpg
 

edwest

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Thank you for posting this. Very informative.
 

newsdeskdan

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Off topic, but where did you find your material for the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series? Mostly overlooked or mostly recently declassified?
In response to your query elsewhere Ed - 'mostly overlooked', or perhaps 'hidden within the dauntingly vast quantity of difficult to access captured German material which still survives today' might be a better way of putting it. Locating and extracting material that's actually useful and interesting is a very time consuming and expensive process - which perhaps explains why others might have been deterred from pursuing original research on unbuilt projects.
But even then the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series would have been impossible to make without the help and generosity of my friends and fellow researchers.
 

edwest

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Off topic, but where did you find your material for the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series? Mostly overlooked or mostly recently declassified?
In response to your query elsewhere Ed - 'mostly overlooked', or perhaps 'hidden within the dauntingly vast quantity of difficult to access captured German material which still survives today' might be a better way of putting it. Locating and extracting material that's actually useful and interesting is a very time consuming and expensive process - which perhaps explains why others might have been deterred from pursuing original research on unbuilt projects.
But even then the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series would have been impossible to make without the help and generosity of my friends and fellow researchers.

Thank you for your reply. As I recall, Phil Butler made a similar comment regarding his book War Prizes where he said that it required going through many unproductive card files to get at the information he was looking for.
 

newsdeskdan

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Off topic, but where did you find your material for the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series? Mostly overlooked or mostly recently declassified?
In response to your query elsewhere Ed - 'mostly overlooked', or perhaps 'hidden within the dauntingly vast quantity of difficult to access captured German material which still survives today' might be a better way of putting it. Locating and extracting material that's actually useful and interesting is a very time consuming and expensive process - which perhaps explains why others might have been deterred from pursuing original research on unbuilt projects.
But even then the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series would have been impossible to make without the help and generosity of my friends and fellow researchers.

Thank you for your reply. As I recall, Phil Butler made a similar comment regarding his book War Prizes where he said that it required going through many unproductive card files to get at the information he was looking for.
Card files - yes and not arranged in any way that would be useful to a researcher. Much of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files, it's simply uncatalogued.
 

steelpillow

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Much of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files, it's simply uncatalogued.
Makes it hard to know what to ask for, or even to ask at all, as you have to find some way round the standard "which catalogue items do you want us to fetch for you to look at?" form-filling routine.
The longer I live, the more I realise that all the bureaucratic form-filling and digitisation in the world can never replace the old adage, "It's not what you know, it's who you know".
 

edwest

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Off topic, but where did you find your material for the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series? Mostly overlooked or mostly recently declassified?
In response to your query elsewhere Ed - 'mostly overlooked', or perhaps 'hidden within the dauntingly vast quantity of difficult to access captured German material which still survives today' might be a better way of putting it. Locating and extracting material that's actually useful and interesting is a very time consuming and expensive process - which perhaps explains why others might have been deterred from pursuing original research on unbuilt projects.
But even then the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series would have been impossible to make without the help and generosity of my friends and fellow researchers.

Thank you for your reply. As I recall, Phil Butler made a similar comment regarding his book War Prizes where he said that it required going through many unproductive card files to get at the information he was looking for.
Card files - yes and not arranged in any way that would be useful to a researcher. Much of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files, it's simply uncatalogued.

I find that hard to believe. Intelligence reports I've read indicate a massive filing operation for internal use. I have seen references to a color coding system, like see "buff card." I have also read descriptions by researchers over the difficulty of finding something "responsive to their request." The difficulty was over wording or with name spellings or even with persons with the same last name, and a request for a birth date to discover if Sam Smith number one is not Sam Smith number two. The military loves creating acronyms and if the right acronym is not known, the file cannot be found. Take B.I.O.S. and C.I.O.S. reports. Don't know what these initials stand for? Well, that's just too bad. There is also a relatively long list of Allied intelligence groups/teams that were let loose on occupied Europe. FIAT? Well, if you don't know, we can't help you. And the massive microfilming operation that was going on in Europe. I have made attempts to locate documents and have gotten no response or the equivalent of file not found. In fact, I have stumbled across more information as opposed to going with, what I thought, would be the more direct route.
 

steelpillow

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Card files - yes and not arranged in any way that would be useful to a researcher. Much of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files, it's simply uncatalogued.
I find that hard to believe. Intelligence reports I've read indicate a massive filing operation for internal use. ... The military loves creating acronyms and if the right acronym is not known, the file cannot be found.
I find it very easy to believe. A single card or inventory entry can cover an entire boxful, even shelves full, of stuff that has never been sorted. The military just enjoy adding a second layer of encryption.
 

newsdeskdan

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Off topic, but where did you find your material for the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series? Mostly overlooked or mostly recently declassified?
In response to your query elsewhere Ed - 'mostly overlooked', or perhaps 'hidden within the dauntingly vast quantity of difficult to access captured German material which still survives today' might be a better way of putting it. Locating and extracting material that's actually useful and interesting is a very time consuming and expensive process - which perhaps explains why others might have been deterred from pursuing original research on unbuilt projects.
But even then the Luftwaffe Secret Projects series would have been impossible to make without the help and generosity of my friends and fellow researchers.

Thank you for your reply. As I recall, Phil Butler made a similar comment regarding his book War Prizes where he said that it required going through many unproductive card files to get at the information he was looking for.
Card files - yes and not arranged in any way that would be useful to a researcher. Much of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files, it's simply uncatalogued.

I find that hard to believe.
Believe what you like. Much (but by no means all) of the 'overlooked' stuff isn't on any card files. It's uncatalogued. A vast quantity of file cards was created covering a vast quantity of documents, now in various different repositories. Many of these documents are well known (or at least known) today, but some files never received cards. But they still exist nonetheless.
 
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