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Boeing C-17 as airliner and four engined Model-777 projects

hesham

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Hi,

the Boeing developed an airliner project similar to concept of the
Military aircraft,the C-17,Also the company designed a four engined
version of Model-777.

http://www.flightglobal.com/PDFArchive/View/2000/2000%20-%200048.html
 

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CFE

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The "enlarged, four-engine 777" reminds me of the Boeing 763 concept. I must admit that the single-deck idea is somewhat fascinating, because it allows for sleeper berths above the seats. The double-deck idea isn't all its cracked up to be if there's no way to directly access the upper deck from the boarding gate.
 

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Triton

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hesham said:
Hi,

the Boeing developed an airliner project similar to concept of the
Military aircraft,the C-17,Also the company designeda four engined
version of Model-777.
http://www.flightglobal.com/PDFArchive/View/2000/2000%20-%200048.html

These designs were also part of the New Large Airplane (NLA) study. The Large Airplane Product Development (LAPD) team at Boeing also closely evaluated the Antonov An-124, BAE Systems BAe 146, and Boeing/McDonnell Douglas C-17 Globemaster III. Based on this evaluation, they created a high-wing super jumbo design (at top)--the Model 763-241. It was configured with a 69-foot-tall T-tail, a 262-foot span and a length of more than 250 feet.

Source: Norris, Guy and Wagner, Mark Boeing 787 Dreamliner Zenith Press 2009 page 17.

CFE said:
The "enlarged, four-engine 777" reminds me of the Boeing 763 concept. I must admit that the single-deck idea is somewhat fascinating, because it allows for sleeper berths above the seats. The double-deck idea isn't all its cracked up to be if there's no way to directly access the upper deck from the boarding gate.

The design at the bottom is indeed the Model 763-246.
 

starviking

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CFE said:
The "enlarged, four-engine 777" reminds me of the Boeing 763 concept. I must admit that the single-deck idea is somewhat fascinating, because it allows for sleeper berths above the seats. The double-deck idea isn't all its cracked up to be if there's no way to directly access the upper deck from the boarding gate.

The current 777s can be fitted with sleeper berths above the seats at the rear of the plane, as a crew rest area. Perhaps that got its genesis with the 763.

Pics of such areas can be seen at http://www.airliners.net/search/photo.search?album=6217
 

hesham

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Hi,

also an early three engined Boeing Model-777.

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1978/1978%20-%202011.html
 

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Skybolt

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Yes, but the specs were totally different....
 

taildragger

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I also recall a (sort-of) 3 engined 777 being schemed as a growth version, perhaps the -300ER. Boeing was having trouble getting an engine manufacturer to agree to the required thrust level and so considered using an oversized APU arranged so that it could provide the necessary additional thrust for takeoff and climb. Gas turbine APUs are probably on the way out, but it's interesting to speculate on whether this scheme could have caught on, not only to boost takeoff thrust but to help out after an engine failure.
In the end, GE, I think, came through and agreed to provide the powerplants needed so the APU didn't get the promotion.
 
J

joncarrfarrelly

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starviking said:
The current 777s can be fitted with sleeper berths above the seats at the rear of the plane, as a crew rest area. Perhaps that got its genesis with the 763.

The 747-400 has had an overhead crew rest in the tail for far longer than the 777, it's an old option.
 

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