Unbuilt, experimental and unusual Boeing 747s

Jemiba

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With regards to the MC 747, is it just a typo, or do I understand it correctly, that
"... the missile was then expected to pass through the 747's flight path about 5.000 ft
AHEAD of the aircraft." ???
Probably this would have been exciting seconds for the crew ! ;D
 

frank

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5,000 feet is nearly a statute mile & it would be accelerating away from & above the a/c, so I don't think you'd be talking much time at all. I assume AAMs do similar paths depending upon location of their targets.


Jemiba said:
With regards to the MC 747, is it just a typo, or do I understand it correctly, that
"... the missile was then expected to pass through the 747's flight path about 5.000 ft
AHEAD of the aircraft." ???
Probably this would have been exciting seconds for the crew ! ;D
 

Triton

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Larger and clean scan of artist's impression of Boeing New Large Airplane (NLA) concept.
 

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blackstar

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Putting the cockpit high on the frame makes it look like a whale. The other concepts are sleeker.
 

hesham

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Triton said:
Boeing 747X Stretch depicted with other members of the Boeing 747 family of aircraft.

Hi,

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/2000/2000-1%20-%200207.html
 

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hesham

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Hi,

from NASA; this picture shows a way to modify the 747 for LH 2 fuel. The upper lobe is expanded
and carried over the full length of the fuselage All fuel is carried in this upper lobe Other component
geometries are unchanges.

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19880069581_1988069581.pdf
 

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Triton

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Jernell, L. S. Performance Estimates of a Boeing 747-100 Transport Mated With an Outsize Cargo Pod NASA Langley Research Center February 1, 1980

Abstract:
The design mission performance of a Boeing 747-100 aircraft mated with an outsize cargo pod was studied. The basic design requirement was the rapid deployment of a combat loaded mobile bridge launcher from a United States east coast staging base to Europe. Weight was minimized by stripping the aircraft of unneeded, quick removal items and by utilizing graphite-epoxy composite materials for most pod components. The mission analysis was based on wind tunnel data and full scale carrier aircraft and engine data. The results are presented in tabular and graphic form.
http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19800009768_1980009768.pdf

Three-view drawing (top) of Boeing 747-100 mated with an outsize cargo pod.

Configuration isometric view (bottom) of Boeing 747-100 mated with an outsize cargo pod.
 

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fightingirish

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Has anyone got any pictures or drawings of the boom operator station on the Boeing 747 Tanker?
Is it the same as on the KC-135 or more like the KC-10?
On KC-135 tanker aircraft, the boomer lies prone on a couch or pallet; on the KC-10 the boomer sits upright.
I have seen this picture at a.net:
http://www.airliners.net/photo/Iran---Air/Boeing-747-131/0413291/L/
 

blackstar

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SOFIA opened its door last month:

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/multimedia/imagegallery/SOFIA/index.html
 

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blackstar

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I could not find my original version of this photo, and could not figure out how to get it out of the Word file and into a jpeg format. So here it is as a pdf. It is the original SOFIA 747 concept with the opening for the telescope in the front of the vehicle. (I photographed this on the wall of an observatory and don't have an original copy.)

According to somebody I talked to, this was actually more aerodynamically sound than the version with the opening at the stern of the aircraft. They also could have had a larger opening for the telescope. However, this would have required having a pressurized section in the front of the aircraft and another in the rear, with a tunnel in between. That was not considered ideal. The current version has a single pressurized section and then a bulkhead separating the unpressurized telescope compartment from the crew compartment.
 

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elmayerle

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blackstar said:
I could not find my original version of this photo, and could not figure out how to get it out of the Word file and into a jpeg format. So here it is as a pdf. It is the original SOFIA 747 concept with the opening for the telescope in the front of the vehicle. (I photographed this on the wall of an observatory and don't have an original copy.)

According to somebody I talked to, this was actually more aerodynamically sound than the version with the opening at the stern of the aircraft. They also could have had a larger opening for the telescope. However, this would have required having a pressurized section in the front of the aircraft and another in the rear, with a tunnel in between. That was not considered ideal. The current version has a single pressurized section and then a bulkhead separating the unpressurized telescope compartment from the crew compartment.

That's the version I originally saw proposed when I went down to what is now the Integrated Systems Division of L3 Communications in Waco, TX. It's interesting to see how it's evolved and if they had to make that radical a design change, I can see why it took so bloody long as they were already working on it when I started there in early 2000, a whole decade ago.
 

blackstar

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I have been trying to get a better quality version of the SOFIA image posted above, but no joy. Here's another (poor) artist's concept.
 

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Triton

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Joe Sutter, Chief Project Engineer on the Boeing 747 project, and his team gave serious consideration to a double-decked overgrown version of the Boeing 707 Intercontinenal in the Autumn of 1965. However, they abandoned the idea after Douglas introduced the "Big Eight", an elongated version of the DC-8, and they already sold a considerable number to the airlines.

The next approach was a much wider fuselage, a double lobe body, not unlike that of the Boeing 377 Stratocruiser only with a mid-wing configuration, upper and lower cabin areas with double aisles on both levels offering 7-8 abreast seating. The airlines were not impressed.

index.php


index.php


One airline executive commented, "How would you like to ditch in the Atlantic in that thing and be riding in the lower cabin?"

Source: Ingells, Douglas J. 747 - Story of the Boeing Super Jet Aero Publisher, Inc. 1970 p. 142.
 

Triton

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The next concept was a low wing airplane (considered safest for ditching), but they still maintained the double-lobe fuselage, upper and lower passenger compartments.

index.php


Airline acceptance was lukewarm. They still didn't like the double-decker configuration. There were two principal objections: The airlines wanted a plane that was compatible with both cargo and passengers. They wanted "convertibility", an airliner and an air freighter. In this area, the double-deck had its limitations. The lower fuselage lobe could accommodate loading big 8 x 8 ft. cargo containers side-by-side, but the upper deck would require redesigned, specifically tailored containers. The airlines wanted standardization for maximum use. It was also pointed out that the towering fuselage design in passenger configuration, with the floor of the upper deck twenty-five feet above the ground, posed serious problems during evacuation.

Boeing tried about fifty different variations of its double-deck concept, but finally gave up.

Source: Ingells, Douglas J. 747 - Story of the Boeing Super Jet Aero Publisher, Inc. 1970 p. 142.
 

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blackstar said:
I could not find my original version of this photo, and could not figure out how to get it out of the Word file and into a jpeg format.

If you save the Word doc as a webpage, it'll generally save the image as a separate jpg at full rez.
 

Triton

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Artist's impressions of Boeing 747X and 747X Stretch.

http://www.testpilot.ru/usa/boeing/747/x/stretch/b747xs.htm
 

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Triton

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Triton

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Evergreen International/Boeing 747 Supertanker fire bomber or "air tanker".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvBRWTumoZI


CNN report on Evergreen International/Boeing 747 Supertanker.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ibP6eT9ITng


Simulated photographs of the Evergreen International/Boeing 747 Supertanker in operation.

Source: http://www.evergreenaviation.com/supertanker/gallery.html
 

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Triton

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Photographs of Evergreen International/Boeing 747-200 Supertanker.

Source:
http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/2009/07/29/10302676.html
http://www.daylife.com/photo/0ePE8MIeUS52P
http://www.evergreenaviation.com/supertanker/gallery.html
 

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Triton

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KC-33A: Closing the Aerial Refuelling and Strategic Air Mobility Gaps by Dr. Carlos Kopp and Brigadier Brian H. Cooper (ret).

Source: http://www.ausairpower.net/APA-2005-02.pdf

This report contains photographs of the Boeing 747-based Advanced Cargo Transport Aircraft (ACTA) prototype which was a US Air Force tanker/cargo aircraft competition given the USAF designation KC-33. The ACTA competition was won by the McDonnell Douglas KC-10 Extender.
 

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Hi,

the Boeing Model 747-700X.

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1996/1996%20-%202416.html
 

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fightingirish

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From Flug-Revue10/1976, page 59:

Notice the 2 wingtip mounted AAR Pods with booms
I presume, these kits could also release a flexible hose for USN and other NATO aircraft.
 

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taildragger

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fightingirish said:
From Flug-Revue10/1976, page 59:

Notice the 2 wingtip mounted AAR Pods with booms
I presume, these kits could also release a flexible hose for USN and other NATO aircraft.

Wingtip-mounted flying booms never seem to make it to the hardware stage and I can imagine some complications that might make them impractical. Similar placement of hose-and-drogue units has some precedent, but not in the USAF (for fixed wing aircraft anyway) although it's been proposed and even programmed several times. A cynic might point out that a multi-point hose-and-drogue refueling capability would make USAF-supported USN/USMC/NATO operations more competitive with all-USAF operations (simultaneous low-flowrate hose-and-drogue connections versus a single high-flowrate flying boom connection), but that would suggest that the USAF is institutionally unenthusiastic about it's assigned missions in support other services.
 

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...USAF is institutionally unenthusiastic about missions to support other services...
Perish the thought.
 

Mark Nankivil

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Wingtip mounted booms strike me as problematic in any kind of turbulence since you have essentially a hard connection between the refueling aircraft and the receiver. I can see some flexibility (no pun intended!) when using a hose/drogue set up which would allow for some tolerance to turbulence. Am I missing something here?!

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

AeroFranz

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I thought Iranian KC-135s had the wingtip boom...anyone got good pictures?
 

taildragger

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Mark Nankivil said:
Wingtip mounted booms strike me as problematic in any kind of turbulence since you have essentially a hard connection between the refueling aircraft and the receiver. I can see some flexibility (no pun intended!) when using a hose/drogue set up which would allow for some tolerance to turbulence. Am I missing something here?!

Enjoy the Day! Mark

Especially with aircraft on both wingtip booms. I can picture a force applied by one receiver aircraft triggering an opposing response from the other and a sort of hysteresis occurring. Of course a damping system could be installed, but it's a complication.
 

Triton

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Models of Boeing 747 concepts at the Boeing Archives.

Sources:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522738/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4956930065/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522878/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522982/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957523348/in/set-72157624753056369/
 

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ouroboros

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Triton said:
Models of Boeing 747 concepts at the Boeing Archives.

Sources:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522738/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4956930065/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522878/in/set-72157624753056369/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/airlinereporter/4957522982/in/set-72157624753056369/

I that fifth picture the 3 engine 747 design concept?
 

Triton

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An earlier study into fitting the 747 with a removable cargo pod:

J.E Price, G.F Washburn, C.B Quartero, 'Boeing-747 aircraft with external cargo pod'

Abstract:

An analysis was conducted to investigate the feasibility of mounting a detachable pod to the underside of the fuselage of a Boeing Model 747 aircraft to carry outsized cargo in case of military emergency. The analysis showed that the 747 configured with the pod and carrying only a bridge launcher as payload attained a range of 8.70 Mm (4 700 n. mi.) at Mach .68. This range was based on a maximum take-off gross weight of 3.447 MN (775 000 1bf) which included 212 kN (47 700 lbf) pod weight and 543 kN (122 000 lbf) payload (bridge launcher).

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19780024104_1978024104.pdf
 

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Graham1973

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D.R Croom, L.S. Jernell, Effects of a military cargo pod and tail fins on the aerodynamic characteristics of a large wide-body transport model

Abstract:

Wind tunnel tests were conducted on a 0.03 scale model of a largewide-body commercial aircraft to determine the effects on the static aerodynamic characteristics resulting from the attachment of a belly pod for the long-range deployment of outsize military equipment. The effectiveness of horizontal-tip fins in augmenting directional stability was investigated. At a test Reynolds number of 1.08 x 1,000,000, the addition of the pod results in an increase in total drag of approximately 20 percent. Trim drag due to the pod is very small. Although the pod produces a significant decrease in directional stability, the addition of the tip fins restores some of the stability, particularly at the lower angles of attack.


http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19790011930_1979011930.pdf
 

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Triton

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Model of Boeing 747 "ant-eater" or "droop nose" located at the Boeing Archives Bellevue, Washington.
This unlikely Boeing 747 model nicknamed the "ant eater" actually led to the final configuration of the 747. At first the 747 as considered a stop gap measure until the 1970s anticipated entry into service of the SST's. Many believed that most 747s would be relegated to freighter service, replaced in passenger status by the SST thus the flight deck had to be clear of the main cargo deck. On this design, the flight deck below the passenger cabin was moved up and away above the passenger cabin.

Source:
http://airchive.com/html/museums/boeing-archives-bellevue-washington-usa/boeing-747-anteater-early-proposed-designs-model-mid-to-late-1960s/19087
 

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Triton

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Model of Boeing 747 "Double Decker"early proposed design model from the late 1990s located in the Boeing Archives Bellevue, Washington.

Boeing announced the 747-500X and −600X at the 1996 Farnborough Airshow. The proposed models would have combined the 747's fuselage with a new 251 ft span wing derived from the 777. Other changes included adding more powerful engines and increasing the number of tires from two to four on the nose landing gear and from 16 to 20 on the main landing gear. The 747-500X concept featured an increased fuselage length of 18 ft to 250 ft long, and the aircraft was to carry 462 passengers over a range up to 8,700 nautical miles. The 747-600X concept featured a greater stretch to 279 ft with seating for 548 passengers and a range of up to 7,700 nmi. A third study concept, the 747-700X, would have combined the wing of the 747-600X with a widened fuselage, allowing it to carry 650 passengers over the same range as a 747-400.The cost of the changes from previous 747 models, in particular the new wing for the 747-500X and −600X, was estimated to be more than US$5 billion. During this time, Boeing also studied a full double decked version that looks very similar to an Airbus A380. Boeing was not able to attract enough interest to launch the aircraft and abandoned it shortly after the merger with McDonnell Douglas in 1997. This left the Airbus A3XX, which eventually became the A380, alone in the NLA (New Large Airliner) category until 2005 when the 747-8 was launched. The 747-8 is most similar in size to the Dash 500. Its fuselage was lengthened from 232 to 251. It has surpassed the Airbus A340-600 as the world's longest airliner. The 747-8 is equipped with General Electric GEnx-2B67 engines. The 747-8 Freighter version or 747-8F is derived from the 747-400ERF. The 747-8F can accommodate 154 tons of cargo. To aid loading and unloading, it features an overhead nose-door. It has 16 percent more payload capacity than the 747-400F and can hold seven additional standard air cargo containers. The 747-8 Freighter made its maiden flight on February 8, 2010. Deliveries of the 747-8F began in October, 2011 to Cargolux The passenger version, named 747-8 Intercontinental or 747-8I, will be able to carry up to 467 passengers in a 3-class configuration and fly more than 8,000 nmi at Mach 0.855. As a derivative of the already common 747-400, the 747-8 has the economic benefit of similar training and interchangeable parts, but it features a new cabin interior and avionics. The 747-8I is to begin deliveries in early 2012 to Lufthansa. The first test flight was on March 20, 2011 after a February, 2011 rollout. The 747-8 has received 126 total orders with 76 for the −8F, and 50 for the −8I as of June 2011. Some source material from: Wikipedia

Source:
http://airchive.com/html/museums/boeing-archives-bellevue-washington-usa/boeing-747-double-decker-early-proposed-design-model-late-1990s/19082
 

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