Sud-Ouest SO 6000 Triton

rieleyj

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France's first jet first flew with an air intake in the nose feeding a Junkers Jumo engine but the performance was unsatisfactory and subsequent versions used a Nene with 'elephant ear' intakes ahead of the wing.
I would like to make a model of it in its original form by modifying the Mach 2 kit but have only been able to find one picture of it in that form and it does not give a good view of the intake which has been described as a 'shark mouth'.
Could anybody please direct me to any pictures or drawings that show the intake? I could ,of course, just cobble something up and nobody could tell me it was wrong!
John
 

dan_inbox

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Here are a few photos of the nose air intake.
 

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rieleyj

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Thank you! They are excellent.
Unfortunately I have uncovered another problem. The only picture I had previously found is the one below which was very dark. On lightening it with Photoshop I saw many rectangular marks which I can only assume are louvres acting as a supplememtary air intake. Was it built like that or were they added later?
I am also confused as I believed from what I had read that only the first prototype had a nose intake but now it appears that there were several different configurations.

p
 

Archibald

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Yes there were many changes along the aircraft life - and its many prototypes. Notably the air intakes. Not easy to keep track.
 

klem

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Thank you! They are excellent.
Unfortunately I have uncovered another problem. The only picture I had previously found is the one below which was very dark. On lightening it with Photoshop I saw many rectangular marks which I can only assume are louvres acting as a supplememtary air intake. Was it built like that or were they added later?
I am also confused as I believed from what I had read that only the first prototype had a nose intake but now it appears that there were several different configurations.

p
There were several stages of development and modification, I think your photo is that of the test prototype with the JUMO (Air inlet through the nose and other openings on the side of the fuselage)
 

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Silencer1

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Here are a few photos of the nose air intake.
This Panhard car have more advanced and attractive design, then "Triton".
And how large was first French jet aircraft: much larger, then any other "first jets" (XP-59, Gloster E.28/39, Heinkel He-178...)
 

dan_inbox

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Thank you! They are excellent.
Unfortunately I have uncovered another problem. The only picture I had previously found is the one below which was very dark. On lightening it with Photoshop I saw many rectangular marks which I can only assume are louvres acting as a supplememtary air intake. Was it built like that or were they added later?
I am also confused as I believed from what I had read that only the first prototype had a nose intake but now it appears that there were several different configurations.
There were 5 Tritons built. N°01, the one in your photo as Klem points out, had a Jumo 004 jet, a nose intake and side louvres. It was the SO-6000J (JuMo)
N°02, also a SO-6000J, was a static test frame only, not flown.
This JuMo version was so underpowered that it was abandoned.
N°03 F-WFKY, N°04 F-WFDH and N°05 F-WFKX all had RR Nene engines (SO-6000N), and the protruding side intakes. At least N°04 had both nose and side intakes.

Separately, yes the Triton was bigger than the Gloster and Heinkel, being a two-seater.
 

dan_inbox

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This Panhard car have more advanced and attractive design, then "Triton".
And how large was first French jet aircraft: much larger, then any other "first jets" (XP-59, Gloster E.28/39, Heinkel He-178...)
Yes Panhard had a series of very futuristic cars. Not only the looks, but the technology, like flat-2 boxer engine (which had a very different sound, too).
It is a pity that their owner Citroën killed the Panhard automobile range. They still are successful in military vehicles, but the magic has left our streets.
 

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Silencer1

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Could anybody please direct me to any pictures or drawings that show the intake? I could ,of course, just cobble something up and nobody could tell me it was wrong!
Jean Cuny famous book about French postwar fighters contains few pages about "Triton", with good 3-view. And some images.
Also J C Carbonel book about French Secret Projects also covers story of "Triton".
However, very few details about intakes.
 

Archibald

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Could anybody please direct me to any pictures or drawings that show the intake? I could ,of course, just cobble something up and nobody could tell me it was wrong!
Jean Cuny famous book about French postwar fighters contains few pages about "Triton", with good 3-view. And some images.
Also J C Carbonel book about French Secret Projects also covers story of "Triton".
However, very few details about intakes.

I've just found Le Fana 1980 monography of the Triton... I'll check.
 

Archibald

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They tried all kind of different air intakes - on the nose, flushed on the flanks, in the wing roots, on the belly...
 

Scapaflow

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So 6000 prototype powered by Jumo 004 with initial side atir intakes.I think it's from the So number 4 and the Nene that the air intakes have been modified.(Pictures from FANA 121)
 

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royabulgaf

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This Panhard car have more advanced and attractive design, then "Triton".
And how large was first French jet aircraft: much larger, then any other "first jets" (XP-59, Gloster E.28/39, Heinkel He-178...)
Yes Panhard had a series of very futuristic cars. Not only the looks, but the technology, like flat-2 boxer engine (which had a very different sound, too).
It is a pity that their owner Citroën killed the Panhard automobile range. They still are successful in military vehicles, but the magic has left our streets.
Those later Panhard cars look like baby contemporary Citroens.
 

Archibald

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This Panhard car have more advanced and attractive design, then "Triton".
And how large was first French jet aircraft: much larger, then any other "first jets" (XP-59, Gloster E.28/39, Heinkel He-178...)
Yes Panhard had a series of very futuristic cars. Not only the looks, but the technology, like flat-2 boxer engine (which had a very different sound, too).
It is a pity that their owner Citroën killed the Panhard automobile range. They still are successful in military vehicles, but the magic has left our streets.
Those later Panhard cars look like baby contemporary Citroens.

AFAIK Citroen did absorb Panhard in 1967 ... d'oh, ninja'd by @dan_inbox
 
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