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Space Shuttle passenger module concepts

FutureSpaceTourist

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
The space shuttle project thread, http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,1928.0, had a brief discussion of ideas to put passenger modules in the cargo bay. I thought it might be interesting to try and capture some more details in a separate thread.

I believe some concepts were originally created in the 1970s, eg I've seen the following reference cited: Steve Durst, 1979, "The Space Shuttle as a Passenger Vehicle", Preprint AAS 79-317. Others were from the early to mid 80s, eg the November 1985 Popular Mechanics article: 'Space Vacation 1995' (starts on p59) mentions proposals by Society Expeditions, McDonnell Douglas, Rockwell and Lockheed. A couple of illustrations from the article are attached.

Does anyone have any more details / art work of any of these concepts?

P.S. I'm aware none of them would have made sense commercially etc!
 

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Orionblamblam

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Top Contributor
Senior Member
FutureSpaceTourist said:
Does anyone have any more details / art work of any of these concepts?
Rockwell did some design work on such things, but seemed to aim most of it at the obviouis forthcoming need to launcha whole lot of orbital construction workers to work on the solar power satellites and such. I've got some simple diagrams around here, but I bet someone else gets to 'em sooner.


P.S. I'm aware none of them would have made sense commercially etc!

The Shuttle was supposed to have a flight cost of $25 million. Carrying fifty passengers, that's half a million each. Compare to the quarter million people are willing to pay (hopefully!) to fly three minute sof zero-G on Virgin Galactic, or the $20 million to go to the ISS.

Of course, the shuttle was also supposed to have a turnaround time of two weeks. So, some things didn;t turn out quite as planned.
 

FutureSpaceTourist

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Just found the following paper, "The Space Tourist", AAS-85 771: http://www.spacefuture.com/archive/the_space_tourist.shtml

It includes the attached graphics and some information on several shuttle passenger concepts from the late 70s to early 80s:
  • A 74 passenger module by Rockwell
  • A couple of Space Habitation Associates concepts, including a modified Spacelab
 

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DaveJ576

CLEARANCE: Restricted
Can you imagine the difficulties involved in getting all the passengers onboard and in their seats while the shuttle sits vertically on the pad? Feeding 70+ people through the one access hatch, down to the middeck, through the access tunnel, into the module, and climbing down a vertical ladder to their seats? Wow, what a nightmare!
 

blackstar

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
DaveJ576 said:
Can you imagine the difficulties involved in getting all the passengers onboard and in their seats while the shuttle sits vertically on the pad? Feeding 70+ people through the one access hatch, down to the middeck, through the access tunnel, into the module, and climbing down a vertical ladder to their seats? Wow, what a nightmare!

Now imagine that as soon as you get to orbit, a bunch of those people will get spacesick. And also keep in mind that as soon as somebody is weightless, fluid flows to their head, tricking their brain into thinking that they have to urinate.

One of the things that I find so annoying about the space field is how many ideas get proposed that don't involve even a tiny bit of common sense.
 

archipeppe

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
blackstar said:
Now imagine that as soon as you get to orbit, a bunch of those people will get spacesick. And also keep in mind that as soon as somebody is weightless, fluid flows to their head, tricking their brain into thinking that they have to urinate.

One of the things that I find so annoying about the space field is how many ideas get proposed that don't involve even a tiny bit of common sense.

Quote.

To get the difficulties to have 40+ people in microgravity take a parabolic flight and see what happens (who writes has participated to 6 mission onboard the ESA Airbus ZEROG aircraft......).
 

Michel Van

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
archipeppe said:
To get the difficulties to have 40+ people in microgravity take a parabolic flight and see what happens (who writes has participated to 6 mission onboard the ESA Airbus ZEROG aircraft......).

that reasion why at NASA, ZERO-G aircraft are nickname Vomit Comet ::)
 

archipeppe

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Michel Van said:
that reasion why at NASA, ZERO-G aircraft are nickname Vomit Comet ::)

Affermative, the first day of flight we suffered, usually, the 30% of people with space-sickness effect (headache and vomit), with scopdex drug.
Even more without.
 

blackstar

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
I was just at JSC for work and was surprised to learn that NASA now contracts out all its parabolic work to ZeroG and their Vomit Comet is in flyable storage. They said that they only use their own aircraft a couple of times a year.
 

OM

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
archipeppe said:
Michel Van said:
that reasion why at NASA, ZERO-G aircraft are nickname Vomit Comet ::)

Affermative, the first day of flight we suffered, usually, the 30% of people with space-sickness effect (headache and vomit), with scopdex drug.
Even more without.

...There's apparently been some research into adding Reglan and/or Promethazine doses to the pre-launch regimen, both of which I take regularly to stem off stomach and vomiting issues associated with gastrophoresis. Not sure how far this has gone, considering the program is nearing its end.
 

Graham1973

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
The attached diagram is from one of NASAs late 1970s Solar Power Station studies.

Lunar Resources Utilizations for Space Construction. Vol. 1,2 & 3

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19830077470_1983077470.pdf

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19830077471_1983077471.pdf

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19830077472_1983077472.pdf
 

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