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scalloped leading edge

Justo Miranda

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I am curious about the purpose of this type of leading edge.
I have seen something similar in the Orion III Pan Am "Space Clipper" only.
Does anyone have any additional information?
 

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Vahe Demirjian

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I am curious about the purpose of this type of leading edge.
I have seen something similar in the Orion III Pan Am "Space Clipper" only.
Does anyone have any additional information?
The Orion III (aka Pan Am Space Clipper) is a fictional spaceplane and not a real spaceplane project. The leading edges of the Orion III's wings do not appear scalloped (see https://www.deviantart.com/bagera3005/art/Orion-III-Spaceplane-2001-A-Space-Odyssey-691129306). I'm not sure about the identity of the object on the left image with scalloped wings.
 

shedofdread

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Scalloped trailing edges can be used to improve CLmax (using energy from the +ve pressure side to promote attachment on the suction side).

The first scan you post looks rather like a 'roll up' wing I saw some time ago. The scallops give the effect of ribs and stiffen the surface somewhat.
 

robunos

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Scalloped trailing edges can be used to improve CLmax (using energy from the +ve pressure side to promote attachment on the suction side).
Interesting . . .
A lot of early and Great War aeroplanes had wire trailing edges, I assume for structural reasons, that gave a scalloped trailing edge. Among these were such successful types as the Fokker Dr.I and D.VII, and the SPAD VII and XIII.
I wonder if their success was in any way due to the effect you describe, albeit unbeknownst to the aircraft's designers and operators . . .

cheers,
Robin.
 

The Artist

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Scalloped trailing edges can be used to improve CLmax (using energy from the +ve pressure side to promote attachment on the suction side).
Interesting . . .
A lot of early and Great War aeroplanes had wire trailing edges, I assume for structural reasons, that gave a scalloped trailing edge. Among these were such successful types as the Fokker Dr.I and D.VII, and the SPAD VII and XIII.
I wonder if their success was in any way due to the effect you describe, albeit unbeknownst to the aircraft's designers and operators . . .

cheers,
Robin.
Those early aircraft had a wire or cord strung along the trailing edge of the ribs in the wing structure. The covering material would tighten and shrink as the dope protective coat dried and cured. This shrinking is what caused the scolloped trailing edge.

As for the leading edge of the Orion III wings, those are intakes for the air breathing engines embedded in the wings.
 

Trident

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I think this type of leading edge is inspired by Humpback whale flippers, a fairly slow swimming species (might give a clue as to the aerodynamic regime this is intended for).

Spanwise flow (dog tooth on steroids)?
 

riggerrob

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For a more detailed explanation, ask a hump-backed whale. They have have huge pectoral fins about 1/3 the length of their bodies. Hump-backs' pectoral fins have scalloped leading edges, presumably to regulate water flow. Since their species has inhabited this planet a few million years longer than humans, they understand fluid dynamics far better than any human.
A few humans have tried to mimic hump-back whale fins in wind-tunnels or wind-turbines.
 

sienar

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There is a company called "whale power" that has been trying to bring this idea to market for ages. They claim better CL, delayed stall, ect without any real increase in drag. Based on their website it looks like they are focusing on turbines now; https://whalepowercorp.wordpress.com/

Although they aren't the only ones to put this idea forward;
Windmill-blade-designed-by-L-Howle-above-left-and-wind-turbine-above-right-utilizing.png
 

Foo Fighter

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The sandpaper nature of shark bodies has also been brought up before. Did anything come of that?
 

shedofdread

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The sandpaper nature of shark bodies has also been brought up before. Did anything come of that?
Some F1 cars have a less glossy finish than others..... ;) Yes, the 'shark skin' thing is alive and well but only used in certain circumstances.
 

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