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Project ISINGLASS & Project RHEINBERRY

asiscan

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Good Day All!

Here are a few of the negative scans - thoughts on whether this is Model 192, Mach 12 Demonstrator or?!?!

Enjoy the Day! Mark

Here are a few of the negative scans - thoughts on whether this is Model 192, Mach 12 Demonstrator or?!?!

Enjoy the Day! Mark
[/QUOTE]
Looks more like the Mach 12 HYFAC studies from early 1970's, in the McDonnell Model 200 series. There were quite a few conceptual designs drawn up, the image below is not exactly but pretty representative of what McD were up to.
 

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GeorgeA

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Definitely HYFAC. Note the reference to “test time (5 mins)” in the statistics.
 

Archibald

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We have X-24C and other threads for that stuff. RHEINBERRY was dead from 1966-67 and Schriever retirement.

"McDonnell-Douglas Hypersonic projects from the 60s and 70s"
 

Dynoman

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I'm curious if the Convair SA-2S was affiliated with the Project RHEINBERRY design effort.

CIA contract No. NA-2000 to General Dynamics (Convair was a division of GD at this time) for an ISINGLASS type program (possibly a predecessor program or one that was congruent at the time of ISINGLASS (document dated 1964). This contract was for a series of aircraft designs started by Convair that involved designs developed from Convair's FISH and GD's F-111 aircraft designs (which was also the only identifying elements in the only RHEINBERRY mentioned CIA document. The code names for the descriptions of the ISINGLASS and RHEINBERRY projects may have been accidentally switched in the document as they describe ISINGLASS incorrectly as a GD design). CIA documents show money that was provided for a B-58 launched manned and unmanned variants and a "high speed self-accelerating" aircraft designed with low RCS. These sound like the Convair Model 234, 234B, and SA-2S.

The designs can be seen in Code One's website: Super Hustler, Kingfish, Fish, and Beyond. Not certain yet, but these Convair designs seem to fit. If a contract number can be found for the specific Models 234 or SA-2S, things would clear up a lot.
 

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Archibald

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Many many thanks for that.

So this mean that
- Convair lost to Lockheed A-11 / A-12 in 1959
- and then Convair hanged on five more years, and in 1964 tried their chance again
- at a SUCCESSOR of the A-12 to try and slain it
- and get some kind of revenge against Lockheed ?

Note that the (technical) distinction between ISINGLASS and RHEINBERRY
was

ISINGLASS: Mach 4.5, airbreathing > ramjets - HYPERSONIC

RHEINBERRY: XLR-129 with 450 seconds isp and 0.80 mass fraction, top speed Mach 22 - SUBORBITAL

The difference between hypersonic and suborbital could be defined as follow

- hypersonic is driven by aerodynamics and is an extension of aircraft flight - won't get higher than 100 000 ft except if it gets a rocket stuck in its rear end

- suborbital is driven by rockets and ballistics, can get out of the atmosphere and pretty high above 200 000 ft (ICBM top 1000 miles or higher)

...so ISINGLASS would be Convair / GD, the son of FISH / KINGFISH, airbreathing, hypersonic, maximum Mach 4.5 and 100 000 ft.

And RHEINBERRY would be the suborbital beast ?
 
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Archibald

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The first of the configurations, Configuration 234A, was optimized for supersonic aerial refueling. It had a gross weight of 41,850 pounds, a zone range of 3,045 miles, and a post-zone range of 1,885 nautical miles. (Range was split into zone and post-zone legs. Zone was the effective range once the aircraft reached its operational speed and altitude, defined as Mach 4 and 90,000 feet.)

Supersonic refueling posed several aerodynamic problems so this configuration was dropped from consideration.
That's extremely interesting.
Because at the exact same time, were also considered
- supersonic refueling between XB-70 Valkyrie
- hypersonic refueling between X-15s
- as a proof-of-concept for "hypersonic refueling Aerospaceplane".
EDIT
- Lockheed A-12 to YF-12, over twenty years 1959 - 1979 they considered it again and again and nearly tried it (my mind is blown !)


You guess, none of these concepts was ever flown, and it is not a great loss - many pilot lives were probably saved...
 
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Sundog

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Just for reference, the hypersonic regime begins when an aircraft is going so fast that the heat off of it starts cooking the air, so that you're no longer actually flying in air. The gas dynamics change at hypersonic speeds.
 

Dynoman

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According to Code One:

"A team of about fifteen engineers led by Randy Kent worked on the renewed design studies. “We put together an excellent team,” Kent recalled almost fifty years later. “We were assigned a secure area that was dedicated specifically for our project. The work was very important to the company because we thought we were going to be out of business if we didn’t produce. Very few new aircraft programs were out there for us at the time.”

"Those working on the A-12 replacement project initially referred to it by an internal billing designation—Work Order 540. The initial studies were divided into four two-month phases that spanned November 1963 through June 1964."

CIA documents posted above states that the General Dynamics (Convair Division):

"Work started in October 1963 and was completed in October 1964," according to one document. Another CIA document (Contract No. NA-2000) indicates that the General Dynamics "ISINGLASS" program (possibly grouped under the one code name due to the type of program (i.e. BGV)) period performance 24 October 1963 through 29 February 1964.

Considering the relatively small size of the GD Fort Worth design group for advanced aircraft (15 engineers) during this same time period it would seem very plausible that the Code One designs are the GD entries for the ISINGLASS program. One CIA document (Contract NA-2000) even indicates that the funds are for a "change in direction" in the basic configuration. This may indicate the change from the FISH configuration (Model 234) to the variable geometry designs (VSF-1), which were referenced in Code One as the starting point for the A-12 replacement aircraft.
 
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