Next Chinese aircraft carrier - Type 002 'Shandong' and Type 003 'Fujian'

combined response

Interesting, that island looks like they're trying to do some Zumwalt-level LO shaping...

How do you stealth a carrier?
I think they've simply shaped it to give their flat panels the best lignment and line of sight they can.
 
Realistically, if a carrier's RCS was reduced to that of say, a B-2, you would then have a carrier-sized "dead spot" in a sea of specular reflections - an exploitable phenomenon.
So you shape it to have some specular reflections, say roughly Sea State 4 or 5, and otherwise reduce the RCS to that of an empty piece of ocean. Bonus points if your engineers can manipulate the reflection lobes to be moving.
 
Not understanding the anger here...the response was meant as a quip with a truism behind it. To reiterate (as meant):

"How do you stealth a carrier?"
quip - "Sink it."

Realistically, if a carrier's RCS was reduced to that of say, a B-2, you would then have a carrier-sized "dead spot" in a sea of specular reflections - an exploitable phenomenon.
No anger from me! SSCVNs would be fascinating to build, if absolutely ginormous. I'd guesstimate 500,000 tons for something the capabilities of a Ford/Nimitz. Hence my crack about calling one Leviathan, and in general them being the Kaiju (giant monster) class.
 
As pointed out by @foolsball "The unobstructed version allows a relatively clear view of the orange objects on the pier and near the catapult amidships."As such it looks indeed as if these "could" be preparations for the first catapult test.(Image via @LeoSongPKU from Weibo)

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Latest update on the PLANS-18 „Fujian“ at Shanghai and as promised, there is indeed an aircraft on deck, namely (IMO) a J-35 mock-up. Also it seems, tanother catapult test is being prepared.(Images via 解放軍評論團/柳成梁 on FB)

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And a second recent image showing the PLANS-18 "Fujian" together with the J-35 mock-up on deck as well as the next catapult test in preparation.

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A previously not yet posted image of the PLANS-18 „Fujian“ at Shanghai in an almost direct top-view. However it seems to be not the most recent one since no dead-weight for catapult tests nor the J-35 mock-up is visible.

(Image via @应用技术联合体 from Weibo)

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Something I never really appreciated before; they went with a much more centrally located island than even the Nimitz class.
 
Something I never really appreciated before; they went with a much more centrally located island than even the Nimitz class.

which is interesting since the French went with an island that's located quite a bit forward on the CdG
while the latest US carriers and the new French proposal are located quite far back.
then you have the Brits, the Italians and potentially the Koreans going twin
 
which is interesting since the French went with an island that's located quite a bit forward on the CdG
while the latest US carriers and the new French proposal are located quite far back.
then you have the Brits, the Italians and potentially the Koreans going twin

I suppose in the case of the PLAN, the Kuznetsov design set them up for this layout. There might be training issues with having carriers with completely different flight ops orientations. Or alternatively it was seen as a lower risk from a topside balance perspective as opposed to going with an all new layout. I think the early Nimitz class had some balance/ballast issues with laid back island and Midway’s stability never recovered from her modernization.
 
I suppose in the case of the PLAN, the Kuznetsov design set them up for this layout. There might be training issues with having carriers with completely different flight ops orientations. Or alternatively it was seen as a lower risk from a topside balance perspective as opposed to going with an all new layout. I think the early Nimitz class had some balance/ballast issues with laid back island and Midway’s stability never recovered from her modernization.
The Nimitz class had a slight (1.5°) permanent list to starboard in neutral trim - they just counter-ballasted with a little port bilge flooding and went on their way.

I'm not sure they bothered to fix that even when building the later ones.
 
The Nimitz class had a slight (1.5°) permanent list to starboard in neutral trim - they just counter-ballasted with a little port bilge flooding and went on their way.

I'm not sure they bothered to fix that even when building the later ones.
From what other posters have said here, that hasn't been fixed. Every Nimitz just has about 5000 tons of ballast water on the port sideto level the flight deck.
 
From what other posters have said here, that hasn't been fixed. Every Nimitz just has about 5000 tons of ballast water on the port sideto level the flight deck.
So it might possibly be that the PLAN did not think that moving the CoG of the ship around was worth the effort. I think people underestimate how hard it is to create warships of this size and in particular create a balanced ship with an angled deck and offset island. This is not an easy piece of engineering for even the most modern navies.

Or again, there might be doctrinal or training reasons for the choice. Who knows. Lots of naval organizations have come up with a lot of different solutions. I tend to subscribe to the USN's decisions because they've been in the game longer than anyone else, but also some other countries are operating different aircraft launch and recover modes and in smaller shapes, so different solutions might well be more optimal. What I find unique about this carrier is that it is by far the closest to a USN "super carrier", or basically any post Midway design/upgrade. But it definitely has a different form and layout to any USN carrier (I dare say even Forrestal) despite having a similar displacement.
 
Makes sense, having integrated sensor masts aids productivity, while also helping to lower the overall radar footprint of the ship. Only possible downside that I see is that the ship will have one point of failure for all sensors, instead of having them more spread out, but even on US CVNs, the sensors are relatively compacted together on the island roof. The British seem to have the right idea with the distributed island setup their QE2s have.
 
So, at this moment, the work on deck is completed ?


As it seems not at all ... a small part in "orange" is still missing and I'm not sure if the final layer is already applied. At least painting the markings is missing too.

This is from 13th February when it was still in the dock.

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Maybe the image posted yesterday was too blurry but here it is clearly visible, also all the red and yellow deck markings are applied on the PLANS-18 "Fujian". I would say, deck is complete and the ship is ready for the party!?
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And my gut feeling tells me that it is not entirely unlikely that this will take place next Tuesday, April 23rd, on the 75th anniversary of the founding of the PLAN. ;)

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