Lockheed Martin joined wing/boxwing projects

hesham

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
28,360
Reaction score
6,006
Hi,

the Lockheed Martin would solve the ramp space problem by
making a future tanker biplane,with joined-wing or box-wing
concept,and here is a radio-controlled model demonstrator
and artist picture for the biplane freughter in service.
For the artist picture I know we displayed it before.
 

Attachments

  • radio controlled model.JPG
    radio controlled model.JPG
    25.5 KB · Views: 1,607
  • artist picture.JPG
    artist picture.JPG
    60.9 KB · Views: 784

flateric

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2006
Messages
9,248
Reaction score
1,672
They were playing with this idea 10 years ago already...
 

Attachments

  • a397062.jpg
    a397062.jpg
    29.7 KB · Views: 121
  • bw600_civ [800x600].jpg
    bw600_civ [800x600].jpg
    81.6 KB · Views: 140
  • 300dpi_usn [800x600].jpg
    300dpi_usn [800x600].jpg
    67.2 KB · Views: 181
  • 300dpi_usaf [800x600].jpg
    300dpi_usaf [800x600].jpg
    51.6 KB · Views: 193
  • bw325_civ [800x600].jpg
    bw325_civ [800x600].jpg
    87.5 KB · Views: 719
  • 300dpi_nato [800x600].jpg
    300dpi_nato [800x600].jpg
    68.9 KB · Views: 760
  • sf_mil [800x600].jpg
    sf_mil [800x600].jpg
    97 KB · Views: 745

Skybolt

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2006
Messages
2,299
Reaction score
206
Ten years ??? Naaaahhhhhhh The box wing (not biplane) is around at least since 1973 (Model CL 1297) 8) .
 

flateric

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2006
Messages
9,248
Reaction score
1,672
I mean these specific cargo/tanker configurations.
 

AeroFranz

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
393
As Hesham mentioned, most airports won't accomodate aircraft with wingspan > 80m (which is incidentally the span on an A380).
That's so you can fit at the gate, but i suspect if you grow the plane much more, the landing gear track does not fit very well on the taxiways.
A boxwing is a nice way around that.
 

donnage99

"Robert Gates, is that you??" sublight
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Messages
996
Reaction score
80
From Lockheed Martin:
 

Attachments

  • Untitled.jpg
    Untitled.jpg
    19.1 KB · Views: 139

pesholito

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Jun 9, 2008
Messages
43
Reaction score
5
Hi everyone,
I am looking for more information on this Lockheed project from the late 1990s. I found this in Google books:
http://books.google.com/books?id=LGYEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA20&ots=i4V84kBF_T&dq=lockheed%20martin%20joined-wing%20tanker&pg=PA20#v=onepage&q=lockheed%20martin%20joined-wing%20tanker&f=false
 

Attachments

  • csa-lm3.jpeg
    csa-lm3.jpeg
    26.4 KB · Views: 87

flateric

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2006
Messages
9,248
Reaction score
1,672
8480d8577052.jpg
 

pesholito

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Jun 9, 2008
Messages
43
Reaction score
5
Thank you! An interesting concept that is. It should be a fun 3 CAD model to create.
 

pesholito

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Jun 9, 2008
Messages
43
Reaction score
5
That's what I am looking for. This particular concept was very interesting for me. A joined wing, with a sort of a BWB lower wing, and a B-2 look alike front part of the body, unusual engine placement and nacelle shape ( rectangular inlets ). Not quite the typical cargo or tanker aircraft, despite being shown with 2 refuelling booms under the wing tips. Aside from this picture though I could find anything else online.
 

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Via Internet Archive:

Lockheed Martin Advanced Mobility Aircraft (AMA)


21st Century Transport

Most of the planes in the United States' strategic mobility fleet are due to retire early in the next century. Already, the C-141B and KC-135, mainstays of the fleet, are 30 to 35 years old, and are experiencing corrosion and fatigue problems. These are the planes that carry troops and equipment into battle, transport peace keeping forces and humanitarian relief and refuel other military aircraft in flight.

What aircraft will fill these roles in decades to come? Right now, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company is studying a new family of mid-sized jet transport aircraft called Advanced Mobility Aircraft (AMA). In the past four years, LM Aero engineers have studied more than 40 design concepts, now focusing on a revolutionary "box wing" design, which will enable greater flight range and multiple refueling booms. Although the basic AMA airframe will be a commercially certified aircraft, extensive use of modular components will allow the AMA to evolve to meet the constantly changing missions of the next century.

Source: http://web.archive.org/web/20001018163008/www.lmasc.com/ama/index.htm
 

Attachments

  • logo.jpg
    logo.jpg
    11.9 KB · Views: 891

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Via Internet Archive:

Current Status

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Advanced Design engineers have studied more than 40 aircraft concepts since the initiation of the AMA project in 1994. Concepts studied to date include:

  • Conventional high wing aircraft
  • Blended Wing/Body aircraft
  • Box Wing aircraft with two refueling booms

Current effort is focused on the box wing configuration and the operational advantages of a tanker aircraft with two refueling booms. Given that the USAF will not replace its current tankers on a one-for-one basis, planners will face a "boom intensive environment" in future conflicts. A twin boom aircraft can provide the USAF with the same number of available refueling booms, but at half the number of aircraft with the resulting savings in procurement and operational funds.

Beginning on March 7, 1997, LM Aero flew a scale model of a joined wing tanker/transport concept. With 18 test flights completed, the model exhibited excellent flight characteristics, and the tests met and exceeded all objectives.

index.php


Design and construction of the 6.5 foot span remote control model was initiated by the LM Aero Advanced Design Department in late 1996 to demonstrate the basic airworthiness and controllability of the joined wing configuration. The model features multiple control surfaces and capability to quickly test alternate control system set-ups.

Planning is under way for a larger proof-of-concept vehicle in the 2000 time frame.

Source: http://web.archive.org/web/20000929172400/www.lmasc.com/ama/status.htm
 

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Via Internet Archive:

Conventional Concepts

A conventional high wing military transport configuration, updated to the latest technology, provides a low risk, but highly capable multi-role tanker / transport. This concept can meet all current air refueling requirements while maintaining full capability for strategic airlift. Using a modular design philosophy, a family of next generation transport aircraft can be designed and manufactured to meet both the strategic and in-theater support roles.

The primary mission of the KC-X concept is the strategic tanker mission using a fuselage mounted “flying boom” and multi-point hose/drogue systems. As a strategic airlifter, the concept can deliver over-sized military equipment into bare bases while providing performance comparable to modern commercial airliners.

The modular medium transport concept uses major structural and system components from the KC-X to reduce life cycle cost. The medium transport is designed to deliver over-sized military cargo into bare bases while providing flight performance comparable to commercial transports. The concept is fully airdrop capable and can operate from short, soft soil fields at reduced take-off weights.

Sources:
http://web.archive.org/web/20000929172415/www.lmasc.com/ama/tanker.htm
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/nsa-pics.htm
 

Attachments

  • kc-x.gif
    kc-x.gif
    7.4 KB · Views: 887
  • medtran.gif
    medtran.gif
    6 KB · Views: 882
  • modular.gif
    modular.gif
    6.6 KB · Views: 880
  • kc-x_1.jpg
    kc-x_1.jpg
    15.6 KB · Views: 41
  • nsa1.jpg
    nsa1.jpg
    28.1 KB · Views: 48

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Via Internet Archive:

Revolutionary Concepts

The revolutionary box wing concept is the current focus of the advanced concept development work at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company under the AMA program. Given that the USAF will not replace its current tankers on a one-for-one basis, planners will face a “boom intensive environment” in future conflicts. A box wing configuration provides the operational advantage of multi-point / multi-boom refueling with a reduced aircraft size and advanced aerodynamics. A twin boom aircraft can provide the USAF with the same number of refueling booms, but at half the number of aircraft. The box wing tanker is also equipped with two drogue refueling systems for interservice and international operations. This allows a single aircraft to refuel two receptacle equipped aircraft, two probe equipped aircraft, or one receptacle and one probe equipped aircraft nearly simultaneously. The box wing tanker still retains a full cargo capability including roll-on/roll-off loading of vehicles, equipment, and ISO containers.

Another revolutionary concept studied at LM Aero is the blended wing-body transport. A configuration where the wing and fuselage are blended together into one structural component is attractive for future tanker/transport aircraft. The blended wing-body configuration provides generous internal volume for fuel and cargo, but with reduced structural weight. The concept can, like the box wing, employ multi-point refueling and by the nature of its basic shape, can be easily modified to meet low observable requirements.

In military use, AMA will be able to perform airlift and tanker missions through the use of integrated modular tanker systems. This will allow the use of one airframe, with the resulting logistics and operational advantages, to fulfill AMC airlift, airdrop, and air refueling missions. In the airlift role, the AMA can carry all the equipment of the Army's light divisions over a 4,000 NM range. The aircraft can airdrop more than 150 paratroops or two 60,000 pound airdrop loads. For tanker missions, the aircraft can exceed the fuel offload of the KC-135R while retaining its basic airlift capability.

The aircraft will also be an effective member of USAF Air Expeditionary Forces (AEFs) by providing strategic lift for deployments, tanker support in theater, and as a multi-mission aircraft for other AEF requirements. Modular airframe and systems design will allow low cost development of derivative vehicles for a variety of missions including reconnaissance and surveillance, electronic combat, rescue, special operations, global attack with future long-range stand-off weapons, and as a 'mother-ship' for advanced UAVs.

Artist's impression of Lockheed Martin box wing KC-X AMA concept refueling USAF fighters with boom refueling system.

Artist's impression of Lockheed Martin box wing KC-X AMA concept refueling USN fighters with drogue refueling system.

Artist's impression of Lockheed Martin box wing KC-X AMA concept refueling NATO fighters.

Artist's impression of Lockheed Martin blended-wing transport concept.

Source: http://web.archive.org/web/20000929172415/www.lmasc.com/ama/tanker.htm
 

Attachments

  • 300dpi_blendedwing.jpg
    300dpi_blendedwing.jpg
    256.4 KB · Views: 75
  • 300dpi_nato [800x600].jpg
    300dpi_nato [800x600].jpg
    68.9 KB · Views: 71
  • 300dpi_usn.jpg
    300dpi_usn.jpg
    427.9 KB · Views: 69
  • 300dpi_usaf.jpg
    300dpi_usaf.jpg
    412.8 KB · Views: 67

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Via Internet Archive:

Contracted Studies

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company completed two NASA contracts to analyze and evaluate an equal basis comparison of an advanced conventional, box wing and strut braced wing transport. The program objectives were:

  • identify key structural and aerodynamic design features, enabling technologies, and technological challenges
  • assess the benefits obtained by integration of emerging technologies with structurally innovative "clean sheet" aircraft concepts
  • compare these benefits to the benefits obtained from the same technologies applied on conventional transport aircraft.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company/NASA Box Wing Airliner (325 Passenger)

  • Applicable To Wide Range of Vehicle Sizes
  • 20% Reduction In Gate Space
  • Large Box Wing Aircraft (600+ Passengers) Able to Operate Within Existing International Airports
  • With No Infrastructure Changes
  • Applicable To Civil and Military Roles

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company/NASA Strut Braced Wing Airliner

  • Increased Structural Efficiency
  • Increased Wing Span Reduces Induced Drag
  • Reduced Wing Thickness Allows Wing Sweep Reduction Without Drag Penalty

Over current technology aircraft these advanced concepts result in:

  • 23-26% Reduction In Direct Operating Costs
  • 21-23% Reduction In Acquisition Costs

Lockheed Martin is now embarking on a second phase of contracted studies to further validate the potential benefits of these concepts.

Artist's impression of 325-passenger Lockheed Martin/NASA Box Wing Airliner.

Artist's impression of 600-passenger Lockheed Martin/NASA Box Wing Airliner.

Artist's impression of Lockheed Martin/NASA Strut Braced Wing Airliner.

Another artist's impression of Lockheed Martin/NASA Stut Braced Wing Airliner.

Source:
http://web.archive.org/web/20000929172425/www.lmasc.com/ama/contracted.htm
 

Attachments

  • SBW_to.jpg
    SBW_to.jpg
    83.2 KB · Views: 614
  • SBW_fly.jpg
    SBW_fly.jpg
    42 KB · Views: 617
  • bw600_civ.jpg
    bw600_civ.jpg
    198.4 KB · Views: 644
  • bw325_civ.jpg
    bw325_civ.jpg
    701.8 KB · Views: 722

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Super Freighter

In the commercial market, the globalization of trade, involving "Just-In-Time" (JIT) delivery, is one of the main drivers for expanded air cargo services. Most existing air freighters are modified passenger aircraft, usually converted when they reach mid-life. These freighters, due to their cabins designed for passenger use, do not efficiently carry containerized cargo and cannot handle most oversize industrial equipment and vehicles. Also, more than two-thirds of the world air freighter fleet (approximately 900 aircraft) is over 20 years old, with most not meeting current, or projected noise and emissions standards. The retirement of these freighters, combined with the projected doubling of cargo revenue ton miles (RTMs), means that a significant market may emerge in the next decade for a new long range commercial cargo aircraft with enhanced ease of loading for containers and equipment.

LM Aero/NASA
Box Wing
Super Freighter (Civil)

Cargo Availability

  • 35,000 ft.³ Cargo Volume
  • 350,000 + lb. Cargo Capacity
  • 48 M-1 Cargo Containers
  • 36 LD-3 Cargo Containers

The Box Wing Super Freighter meets the future demands on long range cargo aircraft and is compatible with existing ground equipment. It can operate from Group 5 airports with a range in excess of 6,000 NM with a 200,000 lb. payload

index.php


The Superfreighter has cargo loading on three decks through eight cargo doors. Multiple deck allow "Combi" operation with passengers on the top deck and cargo on the lower decks.

index.php


index.php


In military service, the Super Freighter will significantly increase logistic support capability for global range military operations and provide high capacity "pipeline" mobility while allowing military transports to focus on combat support. In comparison to the B747-400F, the LM Super Freighter can provide more ton miles per day with fewer aircraft, and greatly reduced fuel costs.

Source:
http://web.archive.org/web/20001101053311/www.lmasc.com/ama/freighter.htm
 

Attachments

  • range_vs_payload.gif
    range_vs_payload.gif
    9.9 KB · Views: 1,655
  • combi1.gif
    combi1.gif
    3.8 KB · Views: 2,174
  • combi2.gif
    combi2.gif
    4.9 KB · Views: 2,182
  • sf_mil.jpg
    sf_mil.jpg
    371 KB · Views: 69
  • gra-sf_civ.jpg
    gra-sf_civ.jpg
    76.4 KB · Views: 64

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Global Range Concepts

Global range aircraft will allow for the projection of U.S. military power anywhere in the world without reliance on overseas bases or pre-positioned supplies. Global range also allows aircrew and support personnel to be stationed within the United States and not at costly, vulnerable forward bases. Global range provides the commander with the point-to-point delivery of men and equipment without use of theater assets or reliance on pre-positioned support.

Several global range concepts have been investigated at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company including both evolutionary and revolutionary designs. Initial studies focused on four-engine high-wing designs using high aspect ratio wings and aerodynamic optimization to achieve ranges in excess of 10,000 nautical miles. These studies led to twin engine designs that used natural laminar flow wings and advanced propulsion to achieve the global range mission. Global range activities now focus on the revolutionary box wing concept. The box wing achieves the global range mission with a wing span comparable to the C-5.

Source:
http://web.archive.org/web/20001115012300/www.lmasc.com/ama/globalrange.htm
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/gra-pics.htm
 

Attachments

  • nsa4.jpg
    nsa4.jpg
    8.2 KB · Views: 49
  • gra-plane3.jpg
    gra-plane3.jpg
    13.7 KB · Views: 57
  • gra-plane2.jpg
    gra-plane2.jpg
    13.3 KB · Views: 42
  • gra-plane1.jpg
    gra-plane1.jpg
    14.1 KB · Views: 39

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems (LMAS) previously named the Advanced Mobility Aircraft (AMA) program the New Strategic Aircraft (NSA) program.

Source:
http://web.archive.org/web/20010306201028/http://skipper.mar.external.lmco.com/nsa/nsa.html
 

fightingirish

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2006
Messages
2,542
Reaction score
1,212
Box Wing
The Box Wing tanker/transport concept was developed in the 1990s. Designed as a strategic mobility aircraft, the Box Wing concept offered multipoint refueling for boom and probe-and-drogue tanking. Engineers at the Lockheed Martin facility in Marietta, Georgia, flew a radio controlled scale model of the Box Wing in 1997 to collect data. The model had a 6.5-foot wing span and successful test flights demonstrated the basic airworthiness and controllability of the joined wing configuration.


Posted: 17 June 2014
Source: www.codeonemagazine.com/gallery_slideshow.html?item_id=3425
 

Attachments

  • Box_Wing_Concept_1990s_TS0038_12_19_1_1267828237_7733.jpg
    Box_Wing_Concept_1990s_TS0038_12_19_1_1267828237_7733.jpg
    62.5 KB · Views: 72

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
From flateric via Facebook
 

Attachments

  • 16797279_10211599459164066_4850153623962147224_o.jpg
    16797279_10211599459164066_4850153623962147224_o.jpg
    30.3 KB · Views: 88
  • 16903171_10211599459204067_1833352089913787416_o.jpg
    16903171_10211599459204067_1833352089913787416_o.jpg
    28.3 KB · Views: 83
  • 16903504_10211599459244068_7499629540111169530_o.jpg
    16903504_10211599459244068_7499629540111169530_o.jpg
    43.3 KB · Views: 80
  • 16797931_10211599460284094_244103200727693356_o.jpg
    16797931_10211599460284094_244103200727693356_o.jpg
    59.1 KB · Views: 74

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,719
Reaction score
971
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
This box wing design by Lockheed Martin is made possible by the use of advanced lightweight composite (nonmetallic) materials. A Rolls Royce Liberty Works Ultra Fan Engine uses advanced turbofan technology to maximize efficiency, achieving a bypass ratio (the flow of air around engine compared to through the engine) nearly five times greater than that of current engines.

Source:
http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/nasas-big-ideas-for-the-future-of-flight/3/
 

Attachments

  • Lockheed_box_wing_aircraft_concept_2011.jpg
    Lockheed_box_wing_aircraft_concept_2011.jpg
    238.3 KB · Views: 90

sienar

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2009
Messages
710
Reaction score
394
I wonder what the landing gear arrangement on that is.
 

Jemiba

Moderator
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
8,342
Reaction score
1,501
The main gear wheel well may be under the black coloured region of the fuselage in front
of the freight compartment door, I think.
 

Attachments

  • main_gear.png
    main_gear.png
    109.7 KB · Views: 46

AeroFranz

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
393
it's the obvious location but it wouldn't provide a sufficiently wide track, IMHO.
Previous pictures, in particular of the freighter variant, showed bulged landing gear fairings, I think that's closer to what's required.
I think a good comparison would be to look at what's on a C-141 or C-5.
 

TomS

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
4,879
Reaction score
2,391
Is there anything that would make a reverse tricycle (two front, one back) arrangement viable again? If so, you could put the twin main gear in the wing roots and just one tail gear in the rear fuselage.
 

Jemiba

Moderator
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
8,342
Reaction score
1,501
AeroFranz said:
it's the obvious location but it wouldn't provide a sufficiently wide track, IMHO.

The Avroliner comes to my mind, as an aircraft where the landing gear is directly attached to the
fuselage. There are bulged fairings under the fuselage, but not in the way of the sponsons typical
for many transports.
 

galgot

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2006
Messages
1,097
Reaction score
1,475
Website
galgot.com
Or maybe an arrangement like on the B-52 ? With small stablilizer lg in the wings ?
On classic configuration airliners , main gears are usualy located at the wing/fuselage box, already very strong part. On this conf , that box is placed more in front, so the main gear (the one taking the main load at landing for example) would need to be placed further back in another reinforced place. That makes more weight . But then, i'm no engineer, they must have thought of that...
 

sienar

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2009
Messages
710
Reaction score
394
TomS said:
Is there anything that would make a reverse tricycle (two front, one back) arrangement viable again? If so, you could put the twin main gear in the wing roots and just one tail gear in the rear fuselage.

This is what I was thinking of earlier but something a bit more 'exotic'. I think one or paired large rear gears may be very structurally appealing in this case. You could also do something like a 180 steerable range on the back wheel making tight maneuvering at gates easier. This would also make the two front gears on the rear of the spar smaller, than on a comparable airliner.

Having two rear gears in the fuselage deploy sideways, especially when those gear are going to be taking most of the engine loads, is going to cost a lot of weight.
 

AeroFranz

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
393
galgot said:
Or maybe an arrangement like on the B-52 ? With small stablilizer lg in the wings ?
On classic configuration airliners , main gears are usualy located at the wing/fuselage box, already very strong part. On this conf , that box is placed more in front, so the main gear (the one taking the main load at landing for example) would need to be placed further back in another reinforced place. That makes more weight . But then, i'm no engineer, they must have thought of that...

this would make the most sense, but one problem with bicycle/tandem gear + pogos (B-52-style) is that you can't rotate the fuselage on takeoff to achieve the required angle of attack for maximum lift on the wing. Either you mount the wing with a lot of incidence (bad for high-speed drag), or you need higher takeoff speeds (and longer runways) in order to get the same amount of lift, but with a lower angle of attack.
 

flateric

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2006
Messages
9,248
Reaction score
1,672
sienar said:
I wonder what the landing gear arrangement on that is.
Earlier LM boxwing concept renderings clearly shows MLG fairings and MLG itself. Don't think it would be much different for ERA aircraft. As you probably know, MLG best place is to be slightly aft from the airframe CW.
 

Silencer1

That now I am the Ruler of the Queen's Navee!
Joined
Aug 3, 2009
Messages
679
Reaction score
218
With the wings placed both fore and aft of aircraft gravity center required angle of attack for take-off could be lesser, then for conventional aircraft layout. Forward and rearward wings generate positive lifting force. Of course, incresing the aircraft angle duringt take-off increase the lifting force more extnsively, then just angle of wing inclination to fuselage.
Perhaps, the "bike" landing gear with extensible forward leg could be a solution?
 

AeroFranz

ACCESS: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
2,375
Reaction score
393
not sure what you mean...
to achieve takeoff, you need

Lift = weight = 1/2 * density * V^2 * wing area * lift coefficient

The lift coefficient is mostly affected by angle of attack (hence you need to rotate). You could increase the wing area to decrease the need to rotate as much and still get the lift you need, but then you're carrying way more wing (and drag) than is necessary in cruise.
I think some of the renderings simply don't show the landing gear fairings.
 
Top