Liberty air defense system.

sferrin

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This was an air defense system based on the M1 chassis. ISTR it had two 25mm guns and ADATS missiles but I can't find anything on it.
 

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sferrin

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Found a few more pictures in an old magazine. This was proposed as part of the Line Of Site Forward Heavy program from the mid 80s. Liberty was based on the Shahine/Crotale firing unit mounted on an Abrams chassis with 12 rounds loaded and had two 25mm guns. Thomson CSF and LTV was the team proposing it.


IIRC xxxxxx (an OTO 76mm Super Rapid mounted on a Leopard I chassis) was also in the mix.
 

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smurf

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IIRC Trinity (an OTO 76mm Super Rapid mounted on a Leopard I chassis) was also in the mix.
Wasn't Trinity an advanced Bofors 40mm?
 

sferrin

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smurf said:
IIRC Trinity (an OTO 76mm Super Rapid mounted on a Leopard I chassis) was also in the mix.
Wasn't Trinity an advanced Bofors 40mm?

Yeah, I'm going to have to go hunt down the name again. Wouldn't be the first time more than one project had the same name but I'll check it out.
 

sferrin

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Not sure if this is the same program or a different interation of the same concept but it appears it at least got to hardware and was called "OTOMATIC".
 

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Rosdivan

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sferrin said:
This was an air defense system based on the M1 chassis. ISTR it had two 25mm guns and ADATS missiles but I can't find anything on it.

I have a PDF on my computer describing it but I can't remember where I initially got it. Here's a text version of the article though. Pair of 35mm Bushmaster III instead of 25mm though. I'll upload the images in the article that aren't in that version later today.
 

sferrin

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You sure on the 35mm? The guns on the model look too small to be 35mm. Tiny compared to the 35mm on a Gepard anyway. ???
 

Rosdivan

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sferrin said:
You sure on the 35mm? The guns on the model look too small to be 35mm. Tiny compared to the 35mm on a Gepard anyway. ???

Actually, looking at the article again, it looks like its a different M1 SPAAG proposal. My bad.
 

kaiserbill

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sferrin said:
Not sure if this is the same program or a different interation of the same concept but it appears it at least got to hardware and was called "OTOMATIC".

That's the Oto-Melara 76mm Project from the early 1980's. Used the ordinance from the Italian naval gun of the same calibre. It never found a client. Interesting concept to try and take the hitting power out to beyond helicopter ATGM range.

The Rooikat uses a 76mm derived from the same naval gun, but not in automatic.
 

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Another gun-missile combination proposed for the americans was the rapier-25mm turret on a Bradley IFV - from an article which also covered the liberty - Thomson CSF and LTV proposal.

There was another 25mm-Roland combination called paladin
 

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Apophenia

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A few details on the FAADS Liberty.

Liberty (White Sands firing trials): AMX-30 hull mounting 6 x Shahine missiles; surveillance radar, a multisensor fire control suite with a tracking radar, FLIR, TV, and integrated IFF.

Liberty I: M1A1 mounting either 6 x Shahine or 12 x VT-1 Liberty missiles and 2 x .50 cal mgs. Called FAADS-M1 by GDLS.

If selected, Liberty I would be the first batch. Liberty II would follow 18 months later.

Liberty II: M1A1 mounting 12 x Liberty missiles and 2 x 25mm Bushmaster. Missiles, TSR 2630 radar antenna, and other systems would be under armour. Mach 3.5 peak velocity and 10 km range for missiles. Crew of two, 27.2 tonnes.

Bradley and M113 Liberty mounts are also mentioned on the JED site.

Other LOS-Forward-Heavy competitors were Martin Marietta/Oerlikon Aerospace with ADATS, (and as JAZZ said) Hughes/Euromissile with Paladin (a Roland development), and UADS (UT/BAe/FMC) with the Advanced Rapier. ADATS won the contest (becoming MIM-146A) but was, of course, cancelled in 1992.

ADATS was to be M113A2-mounted with "Bradley ADATS" to follow. Advanced Rapier was to be similar. "Tracked Rapier" (M113-mount, I think) followed by "Bradley Rapier".

[Mod: The test Paladin mount (with Roland 2s) was to be the M109 hull. Production version would have been Roland 2 or 3 on a Bradley hull. -- JDW Vol7 Issue 24 (21 June 1987)]
 

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Strange that the West never fielded a tracked air defence system less the Gepard when the Soviet Bloc had the ZSU-24 and later the 2S16 Tunguska. I suppose Hawk AA batteries and Stinger MANPADS were the way to go and were latter replaced by the Patriot Weapon System.
 

GTX

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What about the M163 Vulcan Air Defense System (VADS) or it's Israeli Machbet derivative?

vulcan04.jpg

machbet.jpg

machbet_5.jpg


On the missile only front you also have the AM-30 Roland derivative:

Roland_009.jpg


Regards,

Greg
 

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Lots of stuff on the vulcan SPAAG -

But here is the paladin - roland missile-gun system
 

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Mercurius Cantabrigiensis

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amsci99 said:
Strange that the West never fielded a tracked air defence system less the Gepard when the Soviet Bloc had the ZSU-24 and later the 2S16 Tunguska.

There was the ill-fated US Roland programme in the late 1970s in which the European SAM system was extensively redesigned at subsystem/module level to conform to US engineering practice. The entire project was steadily given the budgetary 'death of a thousand cuts' until only a handful of units were built and issued only the National Guard.
 

gollevainen

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Is there any images of the cancelled Mauler SAM system, the one that led soviets to developt the OSA (SA-8 Gecko)??
 

enrr

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sferrin said:
Not sure if this is the same program or a different interation of the same concept but it appears it at least got to hardware and was called "OTOMATIC".
The OTOMATIC it's re-born as Multifunctional Weapons System on turret for Centauro, Dardo or equivalent. The MWS can fire the new guided ammo DART of naval Davide/Strales system
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aw/dti0908/index.php?startid=20

other picture of the old OTOMATIC
otomatic2ja4.jpg

d0fef24ea16e53e9c990fb14c71cc.jpg
 

Rickshaw

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gollevainen said:
Is there any images of the cancelled Mauler SAM system, the one that led soviets to developt the OSA (SA-8 Gecko)??

Yes.

mauler.jpg


That image appears a bit distorted to me. The next one is better and clearer:

mauler_01.jpg
 

Lampshade111

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Can anybody enlighten me on the relationship of the VT-1 Liberty missile to the Crotale NG system?

Were the twin 25mm autocannons on the definite Libery FAADS hooked up to the radar fire control system? Or where they just intended to be used against helicopters and ground targets?
 

Apophenia

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Most sources imply that Liberty and the Crotale NG launch unit are the same thing, both firing the VT-1 hypervelocity missiles developed with LTV for FAADS.
 

Grey Havoc

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Mercurius Cantabrigiensis said:
amsci99 said:
Strange that the West never fielded a tracked air defence system less the Gepard when the Soviet Bloc had the ZSU-24 and later the 2S16 Tunguska.

There was the ill-fated US Roland programme in the late 1970s in which the European SAM system was extensively redesigned at subsystem/module level to conform to US engineering practice. The entire project was steadily given the budgetary 'death of a thousand cuts' until only a handful of units were built and issued only the National Guard.


1. Army Programs

a. ROLAND Air Defense Missile System

In 1974 the US selected the French-German designed ROLAND II
air defense missile system instead of developing a new US short range
air defense system. Hughes Aircraft Corporation won the bid for
technology transfer, fabrication and test of the US ROLAND. The
three countries have established a joint control committee to insure
a maximum level of standardization between the European and American
configurations, and Norway plans to purchase the US version. ROLAND
entered into production in Europe in 1977, and a US production decision
will be made in 1978. Unanticipated difficulties in the exchange and
translation of detailed technical information, resulting in some US
timetable delays and cost increases, have now been resolved with data
transfer essentially complete.
The restructured program approved by OSD in December 1976
with total RDTE expenditure is planned at $276 million.
b. Short-Range Air Defense

1) ROLAND

ROLAND will replace the fair-weather/daylight
CHAPARRAL system in the Corps and rear areas and is required to
counter the increasing night/adverse weather air threat. The
ROLAND RDT&E program consists of a technology transfer and fabrication
effort from Europe (French/German). The program is a
significant U.S. effort to adopt a foreign-developed major weapon
system to U.S. fabrication and will, therefore, have a major impact
on the future success of weapon system cooperation and standardization
with our NATO Allies. The restructured technology transfer,
fabrication and test (TTF&T) program was approved in December 1976
and is proceeding on schedule to a planned production decision in
September 1978. The first two U.S.-produced missiles were successfully
fired from French-built fire units in December 1977. During the
FY 1978 Appropriation Hearings, the Congress directed that $11.4
million in procurement effort be transferred to the RDT&E program
with appropriate adjustments in funds. Total development cost is now
estimated at $276.4 million (previous $265 million plus $11.4 million).
The FY 1979 RDT&E request is $22.7 million, and the procurement
request Is $200.1 million.


THE FY 1979 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAM FOR RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND ACQUISITION
 

PMN1

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Kadija_Man said:
gollevainen said:
Is there any images of the cancelled Mauler SAM system, the one that led soviets to developt the OSA (SA-8 Gecko)??

Yes.

mauler.jpg


That image appears a bit distorted to me. The next one is better and clearer:

mauler_01.jpg

What were the dimensions of the Mauler system when closed down for travel?
 

Grey Havoc

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Again on the subject of Roland, and western tracked air defence systems in general:
6.1 Air Defense Missile Systems based upon the Leopard Main Battle Tank (Studies)
In 1978, under contract by the Dutch Company, Hollandse Signaalapparaten BV., Krauss-Maffei completed a feasibility design study. The objective of the study was to investigate mounting a surface-to-air Missile Tank Turret on a modified Leopard MBT chassis. Three different types of missiles were considered:
6.1.1. "Roland" Surface-to-Air Missile Turret
By considerable retention of most of the standard CA 1 turret, a fully autonomous, air defense missile system was created. In all it was planned that the complete system would carry ten, ready-to-fire "Roland" Anti-Aircraft Missiles. Besides which, for self-defense purposes two 7.62 mm FN Machine Guns and two "Swingfire" Anti-Tank Missiles were proposed. The three man crew concept of the CA 1 was retained. In the roof of the turret the standard Gunner's periscope was replaced by an optronic missile Tracking Unit.
6.1.2. "Rapier" Surface-to-Air Missile Turret
Also with this concept the CA 1 turret remained practically unchanged, two laterally mounted missile launchers replacing the 35 mm cannon. Each launcher containing five of these British developed surface-to-air missiles ready to fire. The means of self-defense which were provided being identical which were proposed for the "Roland" concept. Again the standard Gunner's periscope was replaced by an Optronic Tracking Unit.
6.1.3. "Chaparral" Surface-to-Air Missile Turret
The "Chaparral" lightweight, supersonic, surface-to-air missile requires no guidance after launching, an infrared target seeker head serves this purpose. "Chaparral" is a derivative of the "Sidewinder" AIM-9D air-to-air missile. Eight "Chaparral" missiles (4 on each side) could be stowed in armored launchers on the almost standard CA 1 turret (Guns removed as in both other concepts). Once again, for self-defense purposes two "Swingfire" Anti-Tank Missiles were included in the concept. As target tracking was unnecessary due to the missile infrared seeker, the Gunner periscope remained standard, only an additional "black-box" adaptor was necessary for providing guidance for the "Swingfire" missiles.
found what you were looking for in the Gepard book
 

Grey Havoc

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The Secretary of Defense's 1985 cancellation of the SGT York Air Defense Gun dealt a serious blow to the Army Air Defense community's plan to correct serious materiel deficiencies for air defense of divisional forces in the forward area. Long an area of insignificant Army resourcing, forward area air defense drew increasing attention during the 1970-1980 period with the recognition of rapidly-growing Soviet air capabilities. In particular, Soviet attention to, and resourcing of, a family of heavily-armed antitank helicopters highlighted the problem of inadequate active air defenses for the division. Threat community projections of the ability of future Soviet helicopters to hover and engage at stand-off ranges doomed the expensive and problem-riddled SGT York program. Yet with that cancellation, the Department of Defense further widened the serious vulnerability gap between US maneuver force air defense capabilities and the air threats targeted against them.

In recognition of the seriousness of the problem, the Secretary of Defense directed a thorough combined arms audit of forward area air defense threats and capabilities. This priority study resulted in the his 1986 approval of the FAADS Program. Far more than a substitute for the SGT York, FAADS represented long overdue recognition by the Defense community that air defense of divisional forces was, and remains, a serious deficiency warranting priority resourcing. From the SGT York test, the Defense community learned that "one weapon alone, or even multiple weapons acting independently, cannot defeat the air threat." FAADS Is consequently based on a "system of systems" which Integrates five complementary components: a Line-of-Sight Forward (LOS-F) (Heavy) system; a Line-of-Sight Rear (LOS-R) system; a Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) system; an ADA C3 System; and a Combined Arms Initiative (CAI) element by which non-ADA battlefield systems gain enhanced anti-air capabilities.
(References left out for clarity)
 

Pioneer

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The Secretary of Defense's 1985 cancellation of the SGT York Air Defense Gun dealt a serious blow to the Army Air Defense community's plan to correct serious materiel deficiencies for air defense of divisional forces in the forward area. Long an area of insignificant Army resourcing, forward area air defense drew increasing attention during the 1970-1980 period with the recognition of rapidly-growing Soviet air capabilities. In particular, Soviet attention to, and resourcing of, a family of heavily-armed antitank helicopters highlighted the problem of inadequate active air defenses for the division. Threat community projections of the ability of future Soviet helicopters to hover and engage at stand-off ranges doomed the expensive and problem-riddled SGT York program. Yet with that cancellation, the Department of Defense further widened the serious vulnerability gap between US maneuver force air defense capabilities and the air threats targeted against them.

In recognition of the seriousness of the problem, the Secretary of Defense directed a thorough combined arms audit of forward area air defense threats and capabilities. This priority study resulted in the his 1986 approval of the FAADS Program. Far more than a substitute for the SGT York, FAADS represented long overdue recognition by the Defense community that air defense of divisional forces was, and remains, a serious deficiency warranting priority resourcing. From the SGT York test, the Defense community learned that "one weapon alone, or even multiple weapons acting independently, cannot defeat the air threat." FAADS Is consequently based on a "system of systems" which Integrates five complementary components: a Line-of-Sight Forward (LOS-F) (Heavy) system; a Line-of-Sight Rear (LOS-R) system; a Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) system; an ADA C3 System; and a Combined Arms Initiative (CAI) element by which non-ADA battlefield systems gain enhanced anti-air capabilities.
(References left out for clarity)
Thanks Grey Havoc, very interesting and confronting. Confronting because even though 'In recognition of the seriousness of the problem and priority' identified by the Secretary of Defense; the basic and fundimental need and requirement has still been ignored and played down by the U.S. till this day!!!

Regards
Pioneer
 

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I find it kind of unbelievable that a projectile like this have not been revived and pushed with a big budget, outside of Russia.

A few things:
1. Modern runway independent air threats can not be effectively neutralized by traditional air superiority or long range area air defense. Some kind of short ranged land based system is almost required for safe maneuver.
2. Wheeled and unarmored systems lack mobility and survivability to match up with "heavy formations." With only wheeled systems the entire formation can be locked onto roads and those very expensive systems can be totaled against light artillery fire or micro-munitions, certain to be attempted by any battle-networked equipped opponent.
3. Historical systems before MAV/PGM revolution is likely inefficient and ineffective and new designs leveraging modern AESA radars, DEW, guided cannon munitions does offer a path to superior performance.
 

JohnR

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I agree that the West has been very short sighted regarding ground based air defences, in my opinion it is based on an arrogant presumption that we will always operate with air superiority, a prime example of hope foitr the best, ignore the worst.

It always amazes me that the US is only using Stinger as its point air defence, despite the numerous failed attempts; Mauler, Roland and ADATS and the only system to have entered service Chaparral has been withdrawn.

I know the we -the UK - have improved our ground based performance with the introduction of CAMM increasing range from 6 to 15 miles, but I have a gut feeling that the CAMM system is more cumbersome than Rapier. Also I have not read anywhere if the RAF regiment is adopting CAMM to defend airfields, if they are ,I would suggest using CAMM ER which means they could undertake a degree of area defence as well as defending airfields. However, I actually think that the airfield should be protected by the land based ASTER 30's which would provide a more comprehensive national air defence.
 

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