• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Brutus 155mm truck-mounted howitzer

seruriermarshal

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Joined
May 4, 2008
Messages
877
Reaction score
6
The U.S. Army developed an experimental 155mm truck-mounted howitzer, called the Brutus.

The photos of experimental truck-mounted howitzer were published on the Facebook page of the 75th Field Artillery Brigade (artillery brigade in the United States Army) on 26 October.

The Brutus is a 155mm truck-mounted howitzer for increased mobility and enhanced firing capabilities. Experimental 155mm howitzer installed on an FMTV 6X6 truck chassis.

Howitzer is capable of using a wide range of ammunition for deployment against protected and unprotected targets, to create counter-mobility obstacles to block the manoeuvres of enemy armoured forces and to obscure or illuminate an area.

No further details on the type of howitzer have been released.

The U.S. Army interested in new, more mobile, lightweight artillery pieces.

Early, Army’s officials showed interest in 105mm Mobile Weapon System (105MWS), also dubbed HAWKEYE by AM General, consists of one 105mm cannon mounted at the rear on HUMVEE light tactical vehicle chassis. Maybe U.S Army is also interested in upgrades for or modification to its existing weapons, especially lightweight 155mm cannons, or various types of self-propelled guns.

Having that kind of firepower on-call is immensely important for the Army’s light infantry, especially when conducting independent operations where they might not have the guarantee of support from other services or even other elements within the Army.

https://defence-blog.com/army/u-s-army-unveils-experimental-155mm-truck-mounted-howitzer.html
 

Attachments

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,178
Reaction score
102
Brutus because it is supposed to kill Caesar (the French truck-mounted howitzer)?
 

SpudmanWP

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
1,075
Reaction score
20
It's the Hummer's 105mm big brother



https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/04/26/infantry-units-need-more-mobile-light-artillery-to-counter-russian-capabilities/
 

riggerrob

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
301
Reaction score
7
SpudmanWP said:
It's the Hummer's 105mm big brother



https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/04/26/infantry-units-need-more-mobile-light-artillery-to-counter-russian-capabilities/
———————————————————————-

That reminds us of the experimental Bobcat 105mm SP gun.
It was based on the 1950s vintage, experimental, Bobcat Armoured Personnel Carrier. It absorbed massive amounts of R&D dollars, but never produced a reliable chassis for the Canadian Army.
They built one SP prototype with a 105mm howitzer in a high-sided hull.
Every time it fired, it landed in a different grid square!
Hah!
Hah!
 

bring_it_on

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Jul 4, 2013
Messages
1,907
Reaction score
6
Will be interesting to see what BAE offers the US Army in this space.
 

GWrecks

Big Wingy Thingy
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
77
Reaction score
1
SpudmanWP said:
It's the Hummer's 105mm big brother



https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/04/26/infantry-units-need-more-mobile-light-artillery-to-counter-russian-capabilities/
I remember seeing a Toyota pickup with a 105mm howitzer and I wasn't sure if it was some official modification kit (Aftermarket "upgrade"?) or just another one of those ridiculous things an insurgent cobbled together. Or if it would even work.

It was low-resolution and meant to be a meme more than anything, so for all I know it could have been Photoshopped as well. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

EDIT: It just occurred to me, CAESAR is a L/52 howitzer. I can't tell easily due to foreshortening, but doesn't Brutus appear to be carrying a L/39? Does that mean they put weight into other things like protection?

EDIT 2: Hmm, now I can't tell. The second image suggests it might be a L/52, but I can't see the muzzle.
 

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,178
Reaction score
102
Word is that the gun is Mandus Group's soft-recoil 155, which can take either 39- or 52-caliber tubes.

https://www.armyrecognition.com/weapons_defence_industry_military_technology_uk/u.s._army_tests_truck-mounted_low-recoil_155mm_howitzer_called_brutus.html

http://www.mandusgroup.com/news.php?topic=details&ni=15
 

GWrecks

Big Wingy Thingy
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
77
Reaction score
1
TomS said:
Word is that the gun is Mandus Group's soft-recoil 155, which can take either 39- or 52-caliber tubes.

https://www.armyrecognition.com/weapons_defence_industry_military_technology_uk/u.s._army_tests_truck-mounted_low-recoil_155mm_howitzer_called_brutus.html

http://www.mandusgroup.com/news.php?topic=details&ni=15
Soft recoil? Like a 155mm version of the XM204?
 

Void

CLEARANCE: Confidential
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
129
Reaction score
2
Yes, it is a fire out of battery weapon.

Not much word if and how Mandus group has resolved the longstanding problems that come with it...
 

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,178
Reaction score
102
I suppose Course-Corrected Fuze technology might help.
 

GWrecks

Big Wingy Thingy
Joined
Jul 15, 2018
Messages
77
Reaction score
1
Void said:
Yes, it is a fire out of battery weapon.

Not much word if and how Mandus group has resolved the longstanding problems that come with it...
What problems existed with it, exactly? I know someone who worked in artillery who said that recoil was actually a good thing, though their explanation for it was a bit murky.
 

aonestudio

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
12
Reaction score
9
Test firing of the Brutus, an U.S. Army experimental 155mm low-recoil self-propelled howitzer mounted on an 5-ton FMTV ( Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles) truck at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, Jan. 17, 2019.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1osxeZ9gcg


U.S. Army demonstrates experimental Brutus howitzer
https://defence-blog.com/army/u-s-army-demonstrates-experimental-brutus-howitzer.html
 

jsport

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
13
excellent thank you for posting aonestudio
 

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,178
Reaction score
102
Doesn't look like it's firing out of battery, but maybe the effect is too quick to see with the naked eye.
 

SpudmanWP

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
1,075
Reaction score
20
Slowing down the vid shows that there is no "out of battery" when fired.

IMHO it's due to such a small charge being used to launch the practice round.
 

saumyasupratik

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Sep 23, 2018
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hi, a similar program exists in India, the Indian company Kalyani Strategic Systems Limited showcased this at DefExpo 18. It's simply called Bharat MGS 155mm L39.615172

KSSL is also working with Mandus Group. They showcased the Hawkeye which was rebadged here as the Garuda 105 equipped with Indian copy of the L118 LFG at DefExpo 14.


Eventually they would change the chassis for the Garuda 105 from Humvee to the Tata LPTA 713 2.5 Tonne.
 

Maiwand1880

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Messages
24
Reaction score
18
TomS said:
Brutus because it is supposed to kill Caesar (the French truck-mounted howitzer)?
;D
CAESAr (which is the proper spelling by Nexter and in the Armée de terre) is an acronym : CAmion Équipé d'un Système d'Artillerie. The name of the roman emperor in French is César. Sorry to disappoint.
 

Kadija_Man

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
1,899
Reaction score
14
Hi, a similar program exists in India, the Indian company Kalyani Strategic Systems Limited showcased this at DefExpo 18. It's simply called Bharat MGS 155mm L39.View attachment 615172

KSSL is also working with Mandus Group. They showcased the Hawkeye which was rebadged here as the Garuda 105 equipped with Indian copy of the L118 LFG at DefExpo 14.


Eventually they would change the chassis for the Garuda 105 from Humvee to the Tata LPTA 713 2.5 Tonne.
All three appear to be remarkably lightweight mountings for their guns IMO. It is almost as if they were mockups of what they wanted them to look like, rather than what they should look like.
 

TomS

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2008
Messages
3,178
Reaction score
102
TomS said:
Brutus because it is supposed to kill Caesar (the French truck-mounted howitzer)?
;D
CAESAr (which is the proper spelling by Nexter and in the Armée de terre) is an acronym : CAmion Équipé d'un Système d'Artillerie. The name of the roman emperor in French is César. Sorry to disappoint.
I suppose the French name might not be intended to evoke the Roman emperor (though I suspect it was, if only for the export potential). In any case, do you think the Americans who named Brutus are aware of this? I suspect not.
 

riggerrob

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
301
Reaction score
7
From my understanding ... those new, light-weight howitzers don’t fire out of battery ... because the breech is locked before the firing pin hits the primer.
Rather the barrel (and breech) are not fully forward when it fires.
Basically, the recoil mechanism holds the barrel and breech to the rear after the gun fires. .... reload .... Pulling the lanyard allows the barrel to start its forward travel. The firing pin hits the primer partway through counter-recoil/forward travel. When the cartridge fires, it both stops forward momentum of the barrel and starts pushing the barrel backwards again.
 

jsport

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
13
Does anyone have information on this 155mm towed system which was apparently cancelled when the Future Combat System (FSC) program was started?

Department of Defense Annual Report on
Cooperative Agreements and Other Transactions
Entered into During FY2000 Under 10 USC 2371

Title: Multi-Role Electro Thermal Chemical Armament System for Future Combat System (Formerly Future Direct Support Weapon System (FDSWS) and Viking)

Awarding Office:
U.S. Army TACOM-ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

Awardee:
General Dynamics Armament Systems, Inc.

Effective Date:
23 Dec 1999

Estimated Completion or Expiration Date:
23 Dec 2003


Technical objectives of this effort including the technology areas in which the project was conducted:

Since the OT was signed, the FDSWS program was refocused and merged under the Multi-Role Electro Thermal Chemical (ETC) Armament Program for the Future Combat System (FCS). The Recipient will participate with Integrated Product Teams, perform system engineering and integration, and identify, develop and demonstrate new technologies for lightweight weapon systems. The technologies and concept areas are relevant to ammunition handling, fire control, secondary armament, recoil mitigation, and propulsion for the Multi-Role ETC Armament for FCS.

Extent to which the cooperative agreement or other transaction has contributed to a broadening of the technology and industrial base available for meeting Department of Defense needs:
As part of the OT agreement between General Dynamics Armament Systems (GDAS) and the Government, GDAS is developing a “smart” or “active control” recoil mechanism utilizing Magneto-Rheological (MR) Fluid technology. This technology will reduce the maximum loads and forces seen by the weapon platform. This effort will leverage existing MR technology used in commercial automobile airbags and developed by General Dynamics.

.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

jsport

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
13

Sandia and partners work together to build prototype electromagnetic mortar launcher for future armies
By John German
Sandia and a team of government and university labs are building a prototype mortar launcher that could alter the way armies have launched projectiles at their enemies for a thousand years.
As part of a two-year electromagnetic mortar project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the research team is building a prototype electromagnetic (EM) gun and demonstrating electromagnetic launch of mortar-class munitions. Full-scale field testing is scheduled for this fall at Sandia.
Partners in the project include the Institute of Advanced Technology at the University of Texas; the Munitions Development Division of the US Army Armaments Research, Development, and Engineering Center; and capacitor film manufacturing company TPL, Inc.
The DARPA-funded project focuses on low-cost, high-fire-rate munitions. A complementary joint Sandia project with Lockheed Martin is demonstrating EM-launched missile systems (Lab News, Jan. 21, 2005).
In conventional mortar-firing operations, crews determine mortar range by the amount of propellant (the number of individually packaged propellant charges behind the round), barrel attitude, and external factors such as terrain features and wind direction.
The science is essentially unchanged since 11th-century Chinese combatants used the first crude gunpowder-propelled projectiles to decimate enemy lines. Later in Europe, 15th-century armies perfected the use of cannonballs to pulverize castle walls.
“Although today’s mortar crews become very good over time, launching mortars is by today’s standards an inexact science, and it is constrained by the incremental degree of control offered by propellant rings,” says Bob Turman, Senior Manager for Directed Energy Systems Org. 5440.
In an electromagnetic launcher, coils stacked along the gun’s barrel are subjected to precisely timed current pulses, one after the other, creating a magnetic wave that moves quickly up the barrel and pushes the mortar and armature along with it.
No propellant is necessary, eliminating not only a safety hazard for soldiers and a logistics headache for the military, but also a major source of imprecision in conventional mortar guns. A very slight variation in propellant quality, temperature, or quantity can result in a mortar missing its target.
“There is only so much fidelity you can get with propellant rings,” says project manager Ron Kaye (5445).
The barrel-end velocity of an EM-launched projectile, on the other hand, when timed by computer, can be very precisely controlled, he says. The intensity with which individual coils are fired in succession can also be adjusted on the fly to make slight adjustments, literally while the mortar is traversing the barrel.
“This will allow the warfighter to essentially dial a range,” says Ron. “It will allow for a new degree of control.”
Because no propellant loading is necessary, launch cycle times can be reduced from the 10 rounds-per-minute maximum of a skilled mortar crew to, Bob estimates, 16 to 24 rounds per minute —determined by the time required to reload the mortar and recharge the energy-storage capacitors. Eliminating the propellant also opens the door to fully automated, robotically reloaded EM mortar guns that might achieve even faster fire rates.
EM guns produce almost no muzzle flash and a fraction of the muzzle report associated with traditional artillery. In essence, the mortar departs the barrel with a swoosh rather than a bang. In today’s world of space- and aircraft-based reconnaissance sensing, reducing the optical and acoustic signal will make it more difficult for the enemy to pinpoint the source of artillery fire, says Ron.
Sandia’s DARPA project focuses on land-based army munitions, and the Sandia team has built a nonfunctional replica of a turret containing an EM gun that could sit atop a Future Combat System vehicle or Bradley fighting vehicle.
A full-scale, 50-coil EM gun prototype has been designed and is being built in Area 4.
Projectile interaction with the EM gun barrel components have been modeled on Sandia computers and validated using data from a four-coil mock-up gun. Laboratory tests on the full-scale prototype are scheduled for this fall.
For vehicle applications, a portable electrical power generation and capacitance-based storage system would be necessary, which Bob believes need be only as large and weighty as the turrets on current military platforms.
DARPA is considering EM mortar launchers as a potential component of the US military’s Future Combat System. If hybrid electric vehicles are adopted, the EM launcher could, essentially, share an on-board power plant with its host vehicle, says Ron.
The Sandia-led project falls in the category of applied development and goes well beyond the research projects conducted at Sandia in the early ‘90s that resulted in demonstration of an EM-launched projectile across Coyote Canyon, says Bob.
“DARPA has provided the specifications and the parameters and asked us to build them a mortar demonstration using existing 120 mm mortar ammunition,” he says. “We’re getting close to a working, full-scale gun.” -- John German
 

jsport

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
1,225
Reaction score
13
Please notice Not a railgun


Abstract ID: 11670
Title: Versatile Electromagnetic Mortar Launcher for the JLTV-B

Abstract Text: Sandia National Laboratories has developed prototype electromagnetic coil launcher technologies of various bore sizes, lengths, and muzzle energies. Operational characteristics that distinguish induction-based electromagnetic (EM) launch from competing approaches include: continuously-adjustable, precise muzzle energy; near-silent launch; no muzzle flash; multiple round simultaneous impact (MRSI) capability; minimal EM impact on sensors/payloads in cargocapable rounds and on GPS nose/tail kits; and open breech for auto-loader. Sandia proposes rapid construction and demonstration of an 81 mm mortar launcher prototype for deployment on the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) weapons carrier, payload configuration B, for use by light mobile infantry. This proposed application would be based upon induction electromagnetic gun technology developed and matured at Sandia, and leverage pulsed-power energy density and system efficiency gains achieved by industry in the past few years. Mortar launcher system performance, 81 mm mortar round flight performance, and conformity to JLTV-B carriage specifications would be developed through use of our EM and circuit modeling analysis tools, aerodynamic performance codes, and solid modeling tools. Programmatic, technology, and system maturation
 
Top