• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Boeing 737 Development Concepts

hesham

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
25,312
Reaction score
2,194
Hi,

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2006/02/07/204505/the-737-story-little-wonder.html
 

Attachments

hesham

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
25,312
Reaction score
2,194
Hi,

I found that book in google search and I found a strange info
about the two Boeing-737 configurations,I know they spoke
after that about the Sud Aviation Carrvelle,but notice the hint
under the drawing;

http://books.google.com.eg/books?id=NG2_qiSjmMEC&pg=PA418&dq=aircraft+design++2&lr=&num=100&as_brr=3&cd=6#v=onepage&q=aircraft%20design%20%202&f=true

Also I found on the pages 10 to 14,the M-184 jet airliner,and
I can't ID this aircraft.
 

Attachments

Stargazer2006

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2009
Messages
13,242
Reaction score
264
XB-70 Guy said:
Could the M-plane be from Martin?
Definitely not in that timespan! (Martin's Model 184 was a 1944 project).
Besides, Martin never used the M- as a prefix, that was a mistake from magazines and historians!

M-184 seems like a Fairchild designation... and probably is, too. Other Fairchild projects of the same era were the M-185, M-186 and M-225.

Hesham, if you can post a picture of that M-184, we can see if it holds any commonality with the other Fairchild designs.
 

bucky74

CLEARANCE: Restricted
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
It kills me that all those models are stacked in a storeroom...
 

Orionblamblam

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
7,534
Reaction score
500
Website
www.aerospaceprojectsreview.com
Realistically - and historically - the alternative would be to either throw them out or destroy them. It's rare for an American aerospace company to give a damn about keeping such things.
 

bucky74

CLEARANCE: Restricted
Joined
Feb 5, 2010
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
True - you only have so much space. Wish I could get a job dusting that room.
 

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,723
Reaction score
330
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Model of Boeing 737 concept located at the Boeing Archives Bellevue, Washington.

Source:
http://airchive.com/html/museums/boeing-archives-bellevue-washington-usa/boeing-737-rear-twin-engine-development-model-mid-1960s/19073
 

Attachments

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,723
Reaction score
330
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Model of Boeing 737-200 concept located at the Boeing Archives Bellevue, Washington.

Source:
http://airchive.com/html/museums/boeing-archives-bellevue-washington-usa/boeing-737-200-overwing-engine-model-at-boeing-archive-mid-1960s/19078
 

Attachments

Jemiba

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
8,105
Reaction score
548
Strange coincidence, that the nose of the version with the rear mounted engines looks much closer
to the much later "Boeing 717", although the fuselage diameter seems to have been the same for
all versions.

(blowup of the nose comes from a photo from http://www.sxf-spotterlempio.de/Diafundus.htm )
 

Attachments

Jemiba

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2006
Messages
8,105
Reaction score
548
Triton said:
Boeing 717 as in the re-branded McDonnell Douglas MD-95? Or are you referring to another Boeing 717?
No, I meant the MD-95, or actually the "DC 9", as shown in the lower part of the photo.
 

Sentinel Chicken

American 71 Heavy, contact departure 126.47
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
591
Reaction score
42
Website
theavgeeks.com
Didn't know such models still existed, the forward/overwing nacelle configuration is new to me. There's a past issue from Air International that has pictures and line drawings of the design evolution. Gonna have to go digging in the library for those.

The rear-engined T-tail version I believe is an early design study for five-abreast seating before Jack Steiner went for six-abreast seating to use the 707 fuselage cross-section/nose for two reasons- to save on development costs and time because Douglas was two years ahead of Boeing on the DC-9 and Steiner (with Joe Sutter's help) had determined that six-abreast seating offered better operational costs.

When they switched over to a six-abreast fuselage, the rear engined placement became more problematic. The model in the back left of the first shot *might* be one of the rear-engined six-abreast designs with a low set tailplane.
 

TsrJoe

CLEARANCE: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Messages
367
Reaction score
78
Boeing 737-100 in USAF Military Airlift Command livery (but never ordered for MAC, only as CT-43), scale 1/100 (source: P. LaCicero). Made in the mid 1960s from resin, by Precise Models?

aviation.watergeek.eu/topping_inc.html
 

Attachments

hesham

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
25,312
Reaction score
2,194
Nice find my dear TsrJoe.
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
10,295
Reaction score
856
With regards as to the 737-200, looks like it will be with us for a while yet, especially our Canadian friends:

 

kitnut617

CLEARANCE: Secret
Joined
Dec 15, 2006
Messages
347
Reaction score
57
Flew on one of those to a diamond mine which is near the Arctic Circle a few years ago. We landed and took off on a gravel runway. You can see the 'gravel kit' in the picture above. You actually see more of the -200's converted as freighters up there.

OOPs, should have watched the video first. Four of those airlines shown I used to see at YYC (Calgary International) when I worked there (up to November 2018) and I've seen most of the -200s too
 
Last edited:

Foo Fighter

I came, I saw, I drank some tea (and had a bun).
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
219
That explanation is at least 9 minutes too long but he does love his own voice. ZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
 

taildragger

You can count on me - I won a contest
Joined
Nov 2, 2008
Messages
240
Reaction score
106
Here's a brochure produced fairly late in the development of the world's most successful jetliner 737-100 showing a different aft fuselage profile. Since the 707, all Boeing jetliners (the 727 doesn't count) have had a similar upswept rear fuselage, but this drawing shows that this wasn't always a given. It seems kind of dumpy-looking in this configuration and I think that the final shape is an aesthetic improvement. I wonder if this was a purely engineering-driven change or if someone insisted on more of a family resemblance for marketing reasons.
737 early configuration.PNG
 
Last edited:
Top