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Assault on Bin Laden: mystery of the downed chopper

Fluff

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'Rocky Mountain Airport'
RAM coating on the fuselage, whats the RCS on a powered Rotor? Pretty high?
My gut tells me this thing is being parked on a mountain, rotors off, transmitting something in all directions....
 

TomcatViP

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Sorry, im going to change my view.

the emitter is the central item, one facing fore, one aft, both at 45deg.

the emitter masks some of the other item, so they aren’t emitting.

now it would make sense You can see, one face is flat, one has a panel shape. I Think’ the flat is the emitter.

the 12 square things are cooling the one emitter.

so what ever it is, it gets hot.
Am I the only one who thinks those blue components look like data cables?
High amperage cable. That would explain test article have them on the outside (any shaffing will be grounded already)
 

coanda

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High amperage cable would be orange. The blue tubing is for refrigerants.
 

yasotay

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High amperage cable would be orange. The blue tubing is for refrigerants.
Unless of course you are SOF and you would rather not assist in letting everyone know what you are doing.
 

TomcatViP

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Some mysterious low fly by mentioned by Bidden in his recent interview regarding the raid:
“In my view,” Biden told CNN, “there was one option there that was remaining: you could have done one more very low flight … spying down on the site” – a compound in Abbottabad – “to determine whether this was Bin Laden, because again, there was no certainty.
 
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rooster

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Some mysterious low fly by mentioned by Bidden in his recent interview regarding the raid:
“In my view,” Biden told CNN, “there was one option there that was remaining: you could have done one more very low flight … spying down on the site” – a compound in Abbottabad – “to determine whether this was Bin Laden, because again, there was no certainty.
What is so mysterious? There's a plethora or small drones some that look like birds......no its not a ufo or a stealthy manned recon
 

marauder2048

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Some mysterious low fly by mentioned by Bidden in his recent interview regarding the raid:
“In my view,” Biden told CNN, “there was one option there that was remaining: you could have done one more very low flight … spying down on the site” – a compound in Abbottabad – “to determine whether this was Bin Laden, because again, there was no certainty.
What is so mysterious? There's a plethora or small drones some that look like birds......no its not a ufo or a stealthy manned recon
The only mystery is what Biden actually said since he and Obama can't keep their story straight.
This isn't a political polemic since it's really hard to reconcile the various accounts that have emerged.
 

TomcatViP

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@rooster: to me logically a very low flight with a small drone as you say can only be... A shave.
I sense in that quote something more consequential. And no, I am not arguing about UFO or laser kitty.
It could be a covert flight at low alt to get oblique view of the compound.
 
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RavenOne

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marauder2048 said:
LowObservable said:
Yes, according to most responsible and authoritative reporting going back to 1987.

Despite the absence of available noise reduction options/retrofits
for the S-70/UH-60 family + derivatives (S-76 and S-92)?

With ever tightening noise regulations, you should have seen something by now.

I'm not super familiar with helicopter noise regs, but it looks like the new, more stringent Stage 3 rules only apply to new helicopter types, so there may not be a pressing market for hushkits on existing aircraft.

Also, the lack of commercial S-70s might be a factor -- there really don't seem to be any true civilian users at all, just military and a few paramilitary or police users.

Speaking of commercial and modified HawK ....BHI or B3 (Brainerd Firehawk and Brown Helicopter joint Venture) has got a H-60X (ex US Army UH-60A) which they use for various mods and trials from modified füel tanks / system (my pics below from Heli Expo 2016 in Louisville) To avionics trials.
 

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RavenOne

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marauder2048 said:
LowObservable said:
Yes, according to most responsible and authoritative reporting going back to 1987.

Despite the absence of available noise reduction options/retrofits
for the S-70/UH-60 family + derivatives (S-76 and S-92)?

With ever tightening noise regulations, you should have seen something by now.

I'm not super familiar with helicopter noise regs, but it looks like the new, more stringent Stage 3 rules only apply to new helicopter types, so there may not be a pressing market for hushkits on existing aircraft.

Also, the lack of commercial S-70s might be a factor -- there really don't seem to be any true civilian users at all, just military and a few paramilitary or police users.
Also from attending following year Heli Expo 2017 in Dallas, so I saw BHi/B3 H-60X and this time it was configured for customer weapons trials. So here are my photos.

Cheers
 

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yasotay

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There will be more commercial S-70A in the coming years as many of the UH-60A are taken out of the active fleet. As mentioned a number of them are being bought for military use (no surprise there), but they are also being used by para-military and I believe there are a few being used for logging ops (not sure). Still pretty big helicopter for many of the commercial applications and it has to compete with purpose designed helicopters with lower operating cost.
 

RavenOne

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There will be more commercial S-70A in the coming years as many of the UH-60A are taken out of the active fleet. As mentioned a number of them are being bought for military use (no surprise there), but they are also being used by para-military and I believe there are a few being used for logging ops (not sure). Still pretty big helicopter for many of the commercial applications and it has to compete with purpose designed helicopters with lower operating cost.
Timberline Helicopters Inc using them for supporting forestry etc (my pics from Heli Expo 2016). Also for electricity company in California PAG or PAC is using them...

But tbh any heavy logging is carried out with likes of Erickson AIrcrane or Kaman K-MAX or Super Puma.

cheers
 

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bob225

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Some little bits of info about the choppers on the raid: (updated with quotes)

LEON PANETTA: They decided to make use of these newer helicopters that had been developed because they were better able to avoid radar detection.

JEREMY BASH: We all went out to the observation post—we were given night vision goggles and parkas to stay warm—and looked out over the ridge and waited for the helicopters to emerge. To the surprise of everybody, the helicopters emerged not at the ridge we were looking at, but actually right behind us, right over our backs. It reinforced how these aircraft could come with a pretty good degree of surprise.

LEON PANETTA: They had to put the body on the helicopter, get whatever intelligence they could that was in the compound, destroy the helicopter that was down because it was classified and they did not want it falling into the hands of the Pakistanis or, more importantly, the Chinese.

MIKE LEITER: The president at the moment quipped to Bill McRaven, “You just blew up a $65 million helicopter and you don’t have enough money to buy a tape measure?”

EON PANETTA: Then it was really a question of McRaven working with the SEAL team to practice that operation. A model of the compound was built at one of our classified facilities.

 
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RavenOne

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And we are still no wiser there’s a myriad of clues


- Flight Concept Division at Felker AAF, Fort Eustis

- Modified EH-60A pic from 3 decades ago

- A technical paper from near 4 decades ago on lowering radar signature and acoustics for H-60 of which drawings resemble the movie prop


Also here’s a story about one Nightstalker MH-47G crew that took part in the raid and how the CWO pilot, a graduate of the Marine Corps Marine Aviation Weapons Tactics Squadron MAWTS-1 Weapons Tactics Instructors (WTI) course said it helped him and his crew survive unwanted attention from the Pakistani F-16C.


cheers
 

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Q-nimbus

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And we are still no wiser there’s a myriad of clues


- Flight Concept Division at Felker AAF, Fort Eustis

- Modified EH-60A pic from 3 decades ago

- A technical paper from near 4 decades ago on lowering radar signature and acoustics for H-60 of which drawings resemble the movie prop


Also here’s a story about one Nightstalker MH-47G crew that took part in the raid and how the CWO pilot, a graduate of the Marine Corps Marine Aviation Weapons Tactics Squadron MAWTS-1 Weapons Tactics Instructors (WTI) course said it helped him and his crew survive unwanted attention from the Pakistani F-16C.


cheers
It’s not that hard to evade the F16’s radar in a helo when flying in low, mountainous terrain. Not only can you use the terrain to shield yourself from view, but the helicopter blades shield the helicopter from (Doppler) radar because they act as a phase locked loop; the signal/frequency that goes in goes out (very simply speaking).

So it seems the story is spiced up a bit, but the timeline doesn’t add up either; the first Pakistani planes weren’t in the air until well after the raid, by then the helicopters participating in the raid were already over the border, or at least very close.
 
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Q-nimbus

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About the SHHHHHH-60’s: I think a lot of people focus on it’s radar evading/stealth capabilities. I believe it’s true stealthiness is that it’s very, very quiet. I still wonder if the helicopter that was heard when the raid was tweeted about by a local was the Chinook that came in later, or one of the SHHHHH-60’s.
 

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And we are still no wiser there’s a myriad of clues


- Flight Concept Division at Felker AAF, Fort Eustis

- Modified EH-60A pic from 3 decades ago

- A technical paper from near 4 decades ago on lowering radar signature and acoustics for H-60 of which drawings resemble the movie prop


Also here’s a story about one Nightstalker MH-47G crew that took part in the raid and how the CWO pilot, a graduate of the Marine Corps Marine Aviation Weapons Tactics Squadron MAWTS-1 Weapons Tactics Instructors (WTI) course said it helped him and his crew survive unwanted attention from the Pakistani F-16C.


cheers
It’s not that hard to evade the F16’s radar in a helo when flying in low, mountainous terrain. Not only can you use the terrain to shield yourself from view, but the helicopter blades shield the helicopter from (Doppler) radar because they act as a phase locked loop; the signal/frequency that goes in goes out (very simply speaking).

So it seems the story is spiced up a bit, but the timeline doesn’t add up either; the first Pakistani planes weren’t in the air until well after the raid, by then the helicopters participating in the raid were already over the border, or at least very close.
The Chinook was removing the target‘s remains after the raid

cheers
 

yasotay

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As the Admiral mentioned in the interview (the) onsite operators asked to stay around to collect all of the intel, which it seems they had not anticipated as being on site (somewhat surprising). He then mentioned that they had overstayed their time and crowds were beginning to gather, necessitating a Pakistani speaking ,member of the team to inform the crowd it was a training effort.

The Chinook was called in because the remaining Blackhawk could not lift the entire ground team, remains, and all of the intel from the site. Recall that it is said that the Chinook was used to set up the FARP for the returning Blackhawks inside Afghanistan. In this case likely carried the FARP Security Team and some of the equipment. Assuming it was called forward immediately after the first Blackhawk crashed, and assuming it was still running at the FARP at flight idle, it would likely have taken ~20 to ~30 minutes for it to get to the target area.

Of course there is possibly a healthy dose of misinformation associated with the story as well. It will likely be some time before a truly clear picture of the event is provided.
 

quellish

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As the Admiral mentioned in the interview (the) onsite operators asked to stay around to collect all of the intel, which it seems they had not anticipated as being on site (somewhat surprising). He then mentioned that they had overstayed their time and crowds were beginning to gather, necessitating a Pakistani speaking ,member of the team to inform the crowd it was a training effort.

The Chinook was called in because the remaining Blackhawk could not lift the entire ground team, remains, and all of the intel from the site. Recall that it is said that the Chinook was used to set up the FARP for the returning Blackhawks inside Afghanistan. In this case likely carried the FARP Security Team and some of the equipment. Assuming it was called forward immediately after the first Blackhawk crashed, and assuming it was still running at the FARP at flight idle, it would likely have taken ~20 to ~30 minutes for it to get to the target area.

Of course there is possibly a healthy dose of misinformation associated with the story as well. It will likely be some time before a truly clear picture of the event is provided.
FARP was inside Pakistan, 30 miles from target. Chinook arrived at the target from the FARP about 10 minutes after being called.
 

yasotay

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As the Admiral mentioned in the interview (the) onsite operators asked to stay around to collect all of the intel, which it seems they had not anticipated as being on site (somewhat surprising). He then mentioned that they had overstayed their time and crowds were beginning to gather, necessitating a Pakistani speaking ,member of the team to inform the crowd it was a training effort.

The Chinook was called in because the remaining Blackhawk could not lift the entire ground team, remains, and all of the intel from the site. Recall that it is said that the Chinook was used to set up the FARP for the returning Blackhawks inside Afghanistan. In this case likely carried the FARP Security Team and some of the equipment. Assuming it was called forward immediately after the first Blackhawk crashed, and assuming it was still running at the FARP at flight idle, it would likely have taken ~20 to ~30 minutes for it to get to the target area.

Of course there is possibly a healthy dose of misinformation associated with the story as well. It will likely be some time before a truly clear picture of the event is provided.
FARP was inside Pakistan, 30 miles from target. Chinook arrived at the target from the FARP about 10 minutes after being called.
Interesting. Then the delay associated with the time on ground was likely due to the amount of intelligence that was being recovered from the building. Out of curiosity, where is the information published regarding the tactical actions associated with the entire mission?
 

quellish

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As the Admiral mentioned in the interview (the) onsite operators asked to stay around to collect all of the intel, which it seems they had not anticipated as being on site (somewhat surprising). He then mentioned that they had overstayed their time and crowds were beginning to gather, necessitating a Pakistani speaking ,member of the team to inform the crowd it was a training effort.

The Chinook was called in because the remaining Blackhawk could not lift the entire ground team, remains, and all of the intel from the site. Recall that it is said that the Chinook was used to set up the FARP for the returning Blackhawks inside Afghanistan. In this case likely carried the FARP Security Team and some of the equipment. Assuming it was called forward immediately after the first Blackhawk crashed, and assuming it was still running at the FARP at flight idle, it would likely have taken ~20 to ~30 minutes for it to get to the target area.

Of course there is possibly a healthy dose of misinformation associated with the story as well. It will likely be some time before a truly clear picture of the event is provided.
FARP was inside Pakistan, 30 miles from target. Chinook arrived at the target from the FARP about 10 minutes after being called.
Interesting. Then the delay associated with the time on ground was likely due to the amount of intelligence that was being recovered from the building. Out of curiosity, where is the information published regarding the tactical actions associated with the entire mission?
Was posted previously in the thread:

 

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As the Admiral mentioned in the interview (the) onsite operators asked to stay around to collect all of the intel, which it seems they had not anticipated as being on site (somewhat surprising). He then mentioned that they had overstayed their time and crowds were beginning to gather, necessitating a Pakistani speaking ,member of the team to inform the crowd it was a training effort.

The Chinook was called in because the remaining Blackhawk could not lift the entire ground team, remains, and all of the intel from the site. Recall that it is said that the Chinook was used to set up the FARP for the returning Blackhawks inside Afghanistan. In this case likely carried the FARP Security Team and some of the equipment. Assuming it was called forward immediately after the first Blackhawk crashed, and assuming it was still running at the FARP at flight idle, it would likely have taken ~20 to ~30 minutes for it to get to the target area.

Of course there is possibly a healthy dose of misinformation associated with the story as well. It will likely be some time before a truly clear picture of the event is provided.
FARP was inside Pakistan, 30 miles from target. Chinook arrived at the target from the FARP about 10 minutes after being called.
Interesting. Then the delay associated with the time on ground was likely due to the amount of intelligence that was being recovered from the building. Out of curiosity, where is the information published regarding the tactical actions associated with the entire mission?
Was posted previously in the thread:

Great story but I would suspect there was more than flying on that mission than 4 helicopters, i.e. something else was protecting the choppers from the pak's f16s radar.
 

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