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TomcatViP

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I don't know if this has been referenced already:
Artemis accords web site:
Copy of Artemis document enclosed.
 

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TomS

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I don't think they come in multiple size since all the swiveling interfaces looks to be standards. You can also see the lady test subject in the video bent forward during the presentation what could be a way for her to not enter in contact with the front torso inner shell.

Whatever suit they adopt will certainly come in multiple sizes/configurations. The current ISS EVA suits already come in a couple of different sizes and the astronauts pick the one that works best for them (or whichever one is available that they can make work -- some EVAs have been shuffled to match astronauts to the available suits).

I expect we'll see a lot more modularization or customization in the future, especially for missions where astronauts are wearing suits for a high percentage of their work time. The interface points will be standardized (the diameter of the joint where the arms meet the torso, for example, or the helmet ring) but other parameters might be different (like the length of the arm segments or the height or diameter of the torso).

That said, there are biometric constraints on astronauts -- they have to fit within certain height/weight limits. And suit design is likely to be an input into that (as well as being a driver to suit design).
 

TomcatViP

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I would suggest that the guy that ordered the suits to be "size" customized instead of by gender takes his wife to the next department store, push her in the men's clothes department and tell her to choose whatever fits... Never sputnik like objects would have reached orbital status for so cheap. :rolleyes:
 
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TomS

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I would suggest that the guy that ordered the suits to be "size" customized instead of by gender take his wife in the next department store, push her in the men's clothes department and tell her to choose whatever fits... Never sputnik like objects would have reached orbital status for so cheap. :rolleyes:

The current generation suits are around 40-years old, and unisex design wasn't a priority (which was definitely a mistake). I guarantee the newer generations are being designed with women in mind. See how many of the test subjects in that video are women, for example.
 

TomcatViP

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@TomS : I understand that you see today situation as a marked improvement from past but I personally remain sceptical after what I saw in those video presentations
Having the experience with design ergonomically adapted for women, I can guess that some initial steps are missing here.

Moreover It's obviously not the amount of women you poor in a project that will ensure the result. It's obviously better but women employee are much like their male colleagues and will follow decisions and strategies set by their management.

EDIT:
As an illustration of the above, changes are made when a situation is fully acknowledged and appropriate decisions taken.
The poor-fitting equipment isn’t just uncomfortable for female pilots or air crew. It’s also dangerous and could lead to situations where pilots suffer hypoxia, lose consciousness, or suffer injuries when ejecting because it doesn’t fit right.
----------------------------------//////

Changing subject, Airbus presented its Roxy new design to extract from lunar regoliths breathable oxygen and metals:

 
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TomcatViP

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RS-25-Evolution-For-SLS.jpg

graphic showing the basics of the evolution of the multi-flight, reusable requirements for the SSME to the higher-performance, reduced service life RS-25 production restart requirements. New engine components will be certified for only a small number of firings that culminate in a single flight on the expendable SLS vehicle

 
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TomcatViP

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Japan will provide several capabilities for the Gateway’s International Habitation module (I-Hab), which will provide the heart of Gateway life support capabilities and additional space where crew will live, work, and conduct research during Artemis missions. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) planned contributions include I-Hab’s environmental control and life support system, batteries, thermal control, and imagery components, which will be integrated into the module by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to launch. These capabilities are critical for sustained Gateway operations during crewed and uncrewed time periods.
 

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Cross posting this news.

 

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Grey Havoc

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Worried about adverse reaction from Congress and/or the new administration for some reason?
 

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No announced intention to cancel the program, scale back its goals, or put it under a review as Constellation was. And they're still intending to pick the lander early this year, if a few months later than planned. This is a pretty solid win for Artemis fans.

No real surprise here.



So when will NASA launch the Space Launch System now? 2025 or 2026?
The SLS itself will launch at the end of this year or early next, barring a massive problem. This slide of the Artemis landings is happening because the funding required to hit 2024 never materialized, and they're trying to make the program work with they money they have.
 

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From Gateway to China-Russia lunar station​

The development follows Russia opting not to join eight nations, including the U.S., in signing on to the Artemis Accords last October. The Accords are a set of principles and norms for those who want to participate in the NASA-led Artemis lunar exploration program.

Bleddyn Bowen, a lecturer in international relations at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, told SpaceNews that the development is not such a surprise, given that Russia has always been lukewarm to the Lunar Gateway, part of the Artemis program, and this will have been factored in. However the project will still suffer from the loss of Russian expertise.

Bowen sees the move from Russia as an ISS partner to working more closely with China in lunar exploration rather than ISS partners is part of wider space-related and geopolitical shifts, particularly since the outbreak of the Ukranian conflict.

“This MoU fits the larger trend, which is Russia moving into a closer orbit with China,” says Bowen, adding that this more formal agreement builds on existing cooperation in material science, data sharing, purchase agreements and lunar exploration.

Bowen cautions however that this is “just a memorandum of understanding, so we’ll have to wait and what, if anything, comes from this”.

Zhang Ming, a researcher on international security and space issues at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, told SpaceNews both China and Russia, who have long cooperated in space, have difficulties in working with the U.S. for different reasons. Zhang notes that Russia had expressed concerns that Artemis was too “U.S.-centric” and she would expect “more and more space and lunar cooperation between Russia and China” if the “United State continues its space policies and practices without any change.”

“The U.S. advances its space agenda aggressively and sometimes unilaterally in recent years despite the concerns of the rest [of the] world, which made China and Russia very worried. The mistrust and skepticism towards U.S. motives will promote China and Russia to further their space cooperation,” Zhang said.

Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin last year told Russian media China and Russia had agreed they will “probably” build a moon research base together, following talks with Director of the China National Space Administration Zhang Kejian.

Brian Weeden of the Secure World Foundation also believes the split has been coming for sometime, citing the Ukraine invasion and 2016 election interference. “I think we’re at a much different US-Russia space relationship than we had for the past few decades.”

“I don’t think it’s going to have a serious impact on Artemis. Russia indeed has some experience in robotic lunar landers but no human spaceflight experience and their space sector has been declining for some time,” says Weeden. “The space partnership with Russia in the ISS was driven more by national security and foreign policy reasons than a need to have Russian expertise. It’s useful, but not critical.”

The European Space Agency has also been involved in discussions, while recently having signed an MoU with NASA on the Gateway. “At ESA we are following the Chinese lunar exploration plans very closely in order to see where our respective programmatic interest could meet, primarily the CE-6, -7 and -8 missions but also the ILRS initiative”, Karl Bergquist, ESA’s international relations administrator, told SpaceNews last year.
 

Flyaway

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NASA spokesperson says Falcon Heavy will launch the Gateway's PPE & HALO modules into an initial Earth orbit, and PPE thrusters will send it to orbit the moon.

Parking orbit parameters under review & Falcon Heavy capability hinges on whether boosters are recovered or expended.

View: https://twitter.com/StephenClark1/status/1359973708744581123
Regarding the above and as per NSF this is set to launch NET May 2024.
 

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Blue Origin, the private space company set up by Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos, will begin repurposing its rockets so that NASA can use them to simulate lunar gravity.
NASA has signed an agreement with the company that will see Blue Origin’s New Shepard rockets simulate lunar gravity for up to two minutes at a time by using their thrusters to turn the rockets into a giant centrifuge.
Simulation of lower gravity environments has so far been limited to short, 30-second windows caused by aircraft flying parabolic trajectories.
The new flights using repurposed Blue Origin rockets are set to begin in late 2022, NASA said in a statement.
Closer links with NASA could hand Mr Bezos’ Blue Origin an advantage over Elon Musk’s rival SpaceX business as they compete for lucrative space contracts.

“One of the constant challenges with living and working in space is reduced gravity,” said Christopher Baker, the program executive of NASA’s Flight Opportunities technology demonstration program. “A wide range of tools we need for the moon and Mars could benefit from testing in partial gravity, including technologies for in situ resource utilisation, regolith mining, and environmental control and life support systems.”

 

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TomcatViP

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Nelson, 78, who himself spent six days in orbit when he flew to space in 1986 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, served as the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee during his 18 years in Congress, where he was instrumental in establishing many of NASA's current priorities.

Extracted from the link above. It would have been a pity not to be quoted.
 

Flyaway

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It will fly at least. But at what cost, and at what rates ? that the main issue...

I will be glad to see the Orion capsule fly in November despite all the cost over runs and delays.
It’s more likely to be early 2022 now.

That is a shame I was looking forward to seeing the launch of Orion in November, I hope that there are no more delays to the launch in 2022.
 

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