• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

3D printing technology news

bobbymike

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Joined
Apr 21, 2009
Messages
9,896
Reaction score
965

fredymac

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
2,021
Reaction score
528
3D printed sub

And 3D printed boat (25 feet long and 5000 lbs)
 

riggerrob

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
816
Reaction score
334
Next year's fashion in home 3D printers will print on conveyor belts, allowing plastic parts of infinite length or semi production line rates.
 

fredymac

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
2,021
Reaction score
528
High speed printing using a fluid layer to remove heat and keep resin from sticking.

 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,395
Reaction score
1,607
Challenged by the Army’s emerging NGCV requirements, the Army Research Laboratory is now working to engineer and build new, lightweight yet survivable vehicle parts such as brackets, turret components, propulsion systems and weapons, using “additive manufacturing” or 3D printing technology. In particular, the effort includes the exploration of lightweight metals such as titanium, titanium alloys and hybrid ceramic tile/polymer-matrix composites.


“Titanium is lightweight and has a specific strength to weight ratio. Titanium is half the weight of other metals currently in use," Dr. Brandon A. McWilliams, Materials Engineer, Lead for Metals Added Manufacturing, Army Research Lab, Combat Capabilities Development Command, Army Futures Command, told Warrior in an interview, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. "With additive manufacturing, the costs can come down and make business sense.”

Certain elements of lower-cost titanium have already been in use for several armored vehicle applications such as up-armor for the Abrams tanks and the Commander’s Hatch in the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle. However, this integration has been minimal and largely peripheral. Army engineers working on future combat vehicles are now calling for more titanium for large and vital elements in combat vehicles, in part because 3-D printing can deliver it in a more efficient, lower-cost fashion.

Interestingly, using more titanium for military vehicles is emphasized and anticipated in a 1997 essay, entitled “Low-Cost Titanium Armors for Combat Vehicles.” The essay, published in JOM, states “future-vehicle hull and turret will have to be manufactured using more ballistically efficient materials than rolled homogeneous steel armor. Low-cost titanium, with its good mechanical, ballistic, and corrosion properties and acceptable fabricability, offers the overall best alternative to achieving this objective.”
One major howler in the article though (highlighted by me):
This was published years before “additive manufacturing” existed. Unlike traditional or more standard manufacturing techniques, new combinations of materials can be explored, or even created, using computer modeling as the essential step prior to printing parts with 3-D printing.
Additive Manufacturing (then better known as Laser Sintering) was around during the 1980s (NASA for example was a major pioneer in this area).
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,395
Reaction score
1,607
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,395
Reaction score
1,607
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,395
Reaction score
1,607
With a worldwide shortage of hospital equipment such as ventilators and protective gear for medical workers, organisations, educational institutions and individuals have been joining the effort to meet the demand.

In the UK, around 1,400 3D-printer owners have pledged to use their machines to help make face masks for the NHS.
 

bobbymike

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
Joined
Apr 21, 2009
Messages
9,896
Reaction score
965
 

riggerrob

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
816
Reaction score
334
Back in 2018 and 2019, 3D printer manufaturers promised us home machines that could print items of infinite length on conveyor belts.
When will they go on sale?
 

Richard N

CLEARANCE: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2009
Messages
424
Reaction score
162
I've seen 3D conveyor printers on YouTube vids at recent printer conventions. At the rate new printers are coming out, it shouldn't be long.

For commercial conveyor printers, it would allow manufacturing of bars of materials with differing tailored material characteristics along their length. Printed spars could have stronger materials at the wing roots and only as strong and light as needed at the wingtips.
 

Lc89

CLEARANCE: Confidential
Joined
Aug 10, 2019
Messages
117
Reaction score
40
[URL unfurl = "true"] https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/navy-ships/a32744310/submarine-cold-spray-printing/ [/ URL]
 

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
11,395
Reaction score
1,607

TomcatViP

Hellcat
Joined
Feb 12, 2017
Messages
1,757
Reaction score
517

muttbutt

CLEARANCE: Secret
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
219
Reaction score
18

aonestudio

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
91
Reaction score
126

 
Top