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Author Topic: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative  (Read 20826 times)

Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #45 on: April 25, 2017, 09:52:46 am »
This video looks at recent facility developments at KSC including both commercial and SLS activities.


Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #46 on: December 21, 2017, 05:18:12 pm »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2018, 01:17:57 pm »
NASA studies extending Boeing commercial crew test flight to support ISS

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WASHINGTON — A commercial crew contract modification moves NASA one step closer to using a test flight as an operational mission to maintain a presence on the International Space Station.

NASA announced April 5 that it had updated its Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract with Boeing to study potential changes to the second of two test flights of the company’s CST-100 Starliner vehicle, currently intended to carry two people on a short-duration mission to the station.

Those changes, NASA said, would involve adding a third crewmember to flight and extending its mission from two weeks to as long as six months, the typical length of an astronaut’s stay on the ISS. The changes would involve training and mission support for that third crewmember and the potential to fly cargo on both that mission and an earlier uncrewed test flight.

http://spacenews.com/nasa-studies-extending-boeing-commercial-crew-test-flight-to-support-iss/

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #48 on: May 01, 2018, 01:38:48 pm »
SpaceX and Boeing spacecraft may not become operational until 2020

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A new report provides some insight into the challenges that SpaceX and Boeing are facing when it comes to flying commercial crew missions, and it also suggests both companies may be nearly two years away from reaching operational status for NASA.

The assessment of large projects at NASA, published on Tuesday by the US Government Accountability Office, found that certification of the private spacecraft for flying astronauts to the International Space Station may be delayed to December 2019 for SpaceX and February 2020 for Boeing.

"Both of the Commercial Crew Program's contractors have made progress developing their crew transportation systems, but delays persist as the contractors have had difficulty executing aggressive schedules," the report states.

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The GAO report also provides some clarification on the major technical issues each company is working on as it gets closer to test flights into space.

For SpaceX, the top risks identified in the report are fairly well-known and concern the Falcon 9 rocket used to launch Dragon. NASA has concerns about the composite overwrap pressure vessels that led to a catastrophic accident during fueling of the Falcon 9 rocket in 2016. NASA engineers are also tracking the company's changes to the Merlin engines to be used in the Block 5 design of the Merlin rocket.

"NASA program officials told us that they had informed SpaceX that the cracks were an unacceptable risk for human spaceflight," the report states. "SpaceX officials told us that they have made design changes, captured in this Block 5 upgrade, that did not result in any cracking during initial life testing. However, this risk will not be closed until SpaceX successfully completes qualification testing in accordance with NASA's standards without any cracks."

The report also cited two significant issues that Boeing is working regarding the Starliner. In some abort scenarios the company has simulated, the Starliner spacecraft has tumbled. Boeing hopes to put these concerns to rest with a pad abort flight test, which should occur soon.

NASA also has concerns about Starliner's forward heat shield, which protects the parachutes during re-entry but may damage the parachutes as it is pulled away from the spacecraft. "If the (commercial crew) program determines this risk is unacceptable, Boeing would need to redesign the parachute system, which the program estimates could result in at least a six-month delay," the new report states.

On the positive side, the report notes that unlike some of NASA's other large programs also experiencing significant delays, the space agency will not directly bear the cost of these delays. Because the commercial crew program operates under a fixed-price contracting system, its costs are within one to two percent of earlier estimates.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/05/new-report-suggests-commercial-crew-program-likely-faces-further-delays/

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #49 on: July 24, 2018, 12:40:35 pm »
Boeing suffers a setback with Starliner’s pad abort test

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/07/boeing-may-have-suffered-a-setback-with-starliners-pad-abort-test/

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The engines successfully ignited and ran for the full duration, but during engine shutdown an anomaly occurred that resulted in a propellant leak. "We have been conducting a thorough investigation with assistance from our NASA and industry partners," the statement said. "We are confident we found the cause and are moving forward with corrective action. Flight safety and risk mitigation are why we conduct such rigorous testing, and anomalies are a natural part of any test program."

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Boeing officials have apparently told NASA they believe there is an operational fix to the problem rather than a need to significantly rework the Starliner spacecraft itself.

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One source indicated that this problem may not affect the uncrewed test flight but that it could delay the crew test.

The company astronaut

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Chris Ferguson, the citizen test pilot for the first flight of Boeing’s commercial craft, hopes to make history — and make space more accessible.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/07/24/feature/nasa-trained-boeing-employed-chris-ferguson-hopes-to-make-history-as-a-company-astronaut/

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #50 on: August 03, 2018, 09:54:27 am »
NASA announces astronaut crews for first commercial vehicle flights.


Offline Flyaway

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Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #52 on: August 09, 2018, 08:56:32 am »

Offline Grey Havoc

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« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 02:14:56 am by Grey Havoc »
The sole imperative of a government, once instituted, is to survive.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #54 on: September 01, 2018, 07:24:25 am »
What The Flight Tests Will Teach Us



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Learn about the first flights of Boeing’s Starliner and SpaceX’s Crew Dragon with and without astronauts on board, and what they will accomplish for NASA and its commercial partners.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2018/08/31/what-the-flight-tests-will-teach-us/

Offline fredymac

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #55 on: September 06, 2018, 12:51:04 pm »

Offline Grey Havoc

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The sole imperative of a government, once instituted, is to survive.

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #57 on: October 04, 2018, 02:00:16 pm »

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #58 on: October 04, 2018, 11:22:29 pm »
https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew/2018/10/04/nasas-commercial-crew-program-target-test-flight-dates-4/
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Test Flight Planning Dates:
Boeing Orbital Flight Test (uncrewed): March 2019
Boeing Crew Flight Test (crewed): August 2019

Offline Flyaway

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Re: Commercial Crew Development (CCDev) initiative
« Reply #59 on: October 06, 2018, 01:58:39 am »
NASA announced that it bought Soyuz seats for 2017 and 2018 from Boeing last week:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/additional-crew-flights-boost-space-station-science-and-research/