Yangel R-56 (8K68 )

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flateric said:
Yangel's 8K68 (R-56)
http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/r56.htm

...Yup. One of those Universal Raket designs where you simply took the same basic ballistic missile and pyramid-stacked them to make as big a booster as you needed to get the job done. Always felt the damn things had about as much chance of getting off the ground in one piece as a house of cards.
 
Bonus 1
 

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Hello there.
I just found some new information about the Soviet lunar program. It turns out that there was an intermediate link between "vostok/voskhod" and "soyuz" called "sever" (translated as north), had the indices 5k and 3k. See the first 5 photos. They show: 1 test ship "sever", a kind of Soviet gemini 2. sever 3 upper stage 4 docking of upper stages; then the north docked with the" train " of upper stages. 5 sever is ready to fly around the moon. The flight was planned to be manned. Unfortunately, the program was quickly closed, immediately switching to Soyuz.
Now just about that. The first project of "soyuz" was called soyuz-a. 6 photo - its model (there should still be solar panels, see below). Then it docked with the upper stage soyz-b and went to the moon (7 and 8 photos). Pay attention to the similarity of Shenzhou with this project. Well, as a bonus, I attach the final project of a manned flyby of the moon, 3 variations of the r-56 Yangel rocket and Afanasyev's book "non-light ships", from where I took most of the information. Enjoy
This is a great find and adds some clarity… always looking for more info on Yangel’s plans for the moon… sketches anything thing..
 
An R-56 monoblock with nine RD-270s would have been something to see-'the toxic avenger.'
 
Hello there.
I just found some new information about the Soviet lunar program. It turns out that there was an intermediate link between "vostok/voskhod" and "soyuz" called "sever" (translated as north), had the indices 5k and 3k. See the first 5 photos. They show: 1 test ship "sever", a kind of Soviet gemini 2. sever 3 upper stage 4 docking of upper stages; then the north docked with the" train " of upper stages. 5 sever is ready to fly around the moon. The flight was planned to be manned. Unfortunately, the program was quickly closed, immediately switching to Soyuz.
Now just about that. The first project of "soyuz" was called soyuz-a. 6 photo - its model (there should still be solar panels, see below). Then it docked with the upper stage soyz-b and went to the moon (7 and 8 photos). Pay attention to the similarity of Shenzhou with this project. Well, as a bonus, I attach the final project of a manned flyby of the moon, 3 variations of the r-56 Yangel rocket and Afanasyev's book "non-light ships", from where I took most of the information. Enjoy
This is a great find and adds some clarity… always looking for more info on Yangel’s plans for the moon… sketches anything thing..

r-56, that was the name of Yangel's rocket, and it existed. Three options were worked out: six-block, four-block and monoblock. We stopped at the monoblock, but then the government said: Korolev works for the media, a man for himself, and who will work for us? Stop worrying about any Moon there, strengthen the defense. However, they took part in the H-1 program. We made Block E for the lunar lander. This is the LC propulsion module, which was supposed to carry out a soft landing on the Moon and launch from it.
They haven't really developed a rocket either. They have been shut down at this stage. And there was no talk about the ship. the r-56 was closed very quickly, there were already a lot of projects.
 
Korolev works for TASS…something…Yangal works for us….I can’t remember all of it. He was a lot like Putin or Schriever in the United States…not *really* a space guy. Utkin was of his school and Leonid Kuchma under him, correct?

I think the R-56 was the best HLLV concept of that era.
 
Korolev works for TASS…something…Yangal works for us….I can’t remember all of it. He was a lot like Putin or Schriever in the United States…not *really* a space guy. Utkin was of his school and Leonid Kuchma under him, correct?

I think the R-56 was the best HLLV concept of that era.


See HERE :-

'The military had a saying: "Korolev works for TASS, Chelomei makes shit, and Yangel works for us". '

cheers,
Robin.
 
Ha!
There is a priceless photo of Chelomei chewing out an underling over at russianspaceweb, if memory serves. I don’t think it was Nikita’s son at least.
 
Korolev works for TASS…something…Yangal works for us….I can’t remember all of it. He was a lot like Putin or Schriever in the United States…not *really* a space guy. Utkin was of his school and Leonid Kuchma under him, correct?

I think the R-56 was the best HLLV concept of that era.


See HERE :-

'The military had a saying: "Korolev works for TASS, Chelomei makes shit, and Yangel works for us". '

cheers,
Robin.
Exactly, my friend :) I just decided to translate ot more politely
 
Korolev works for TASS…something…Yangal works for us….I can’t remember all of it. He was a lot like Putin or Schriever in the United States…not *really* a space guy. Utkin was of his school and Leonid Kuchma under him, correct?

I think the R-56 was the best HLLV concept of that era.

R-56 Polyblock Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (by Hazegrayart)​

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
View: https://www.youtube.com/embed/0K_3GVG6X_Y?si=IYhZvMUGQ-eqx7_r
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
I am surprised China didn't try something like the R-56 Monoblock, scaled up.

Nine RD-270s would have given them a true HLLV. (Once the bugs were worked out---perhaps by using both multiple nozzles AND partitioning injector plates---whatever it took.

Instead, they spent money developing many different propellant combinations.
 
I am surprised China didn't try something like the R-56 Monoblock, scaled up.

Nine RD-270s would have given them a true HLLV. (Once the bugs were worked out---perhaps by using both multiple nozzles AND partitioning injector plates---whatever it took.

Instead, they spent money developing many different propellant combinations.

Until recently, China had only three launch centers, Xichang, Tayuan and Jiuquan, these are all inland, and in relatively hard to access or isolated regions, so rail transport is necessary to bring rocket stages and payload from their main manufacturing sites around Beijing or Shanghai, this limits diameter of rocket stages from their launch sites to 3.35m, the maximum loading gauge of chinese railway (actually, the origin of that diameter comes more from early Ballistic missile design than launch sites access, but it was for the same reason, rail transport).

So the chinese couldn't have rockets with large diameters. That's why they went for side boosters for the CZ2F that launches the Shenzhou, or the CZ3B that launches most of their Geostationnary satellite. There were plans in the 80s and 90s to make larger launchers by either lenghtening the boosters or even adding 4 of them for a total of 8, but that didn't go anywhere since the Chinese didn't need these capabilities in the short or medium term.

Then the chinese developped Closed Cycle kerolox (derived from the RD-120) , and larger Open cycle hydrolox engines, and they built wenchang space center in Hainan, whose rocket stage are brought from the Mainland by ships and barge.

Clustering engines is not particularly easy, it seemed their first Kerolox engines, YF-100, could not be easily clustered in more than a pair, and it seems they only very recently (past 5 years) managed to make variants and new engines that could be clustered more efficiently.
 

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