XB-52 competition

RyanCrierie

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Skybolt said:
A chart describing the three original proposals for the 1945 Hevy Bombardment Aircraft competition of 1945.
Ranking was:

#1 Boeing won with 846 points
#2 Martin with 824 points
#3 Convair with 748 points
 

lark

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It must be noted that the Fairchild M-128 project
was inteded for a US Navy competition and not for the B-52 one..
 

Vahe Demirjian

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There's more info on the Fairchild 121 in American Secret Projects: Bombers, Attack, and Anti-Submarine Aircraft 1945-1974.
 

TomS

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This is a Douglas Model D-1211J, one of competitor.
I'm taking that the US got an eye on the Russian's Bear bomber......
Timing doesn't support that. Earlier in this thread we have a January 1951 magazine article on this design, which describes it as being a year old at that point, so the design is c. 1950. The requirement that led to the Tu-95 was issued in 1950 and the design approved in July 1951, so design work was happening in 1950-51, the exact same time that the Douglas design was being developed. It seems very unlikely that the Douglas designers were aware of the Tupolev aircraft's configuration at that time. It's probably a case of parallel requirements using similar technology bases coming up with similar designs.
 

taildragger

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I'd bet that if the Fairchild approach had progressed much further, the anticipated cost of throwing away what are effectively full-sized wings (and the cost of cleaning up their impact sites) would have inspired the development of a fly-back version, at least for training flights. Even Gen. Lemay had a budget.
 

edwest

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This is a Douglas Model D-1211J, one of competitor.
I'm taking that the US got an eye on the Russian's Bear bomber......
Timing doesn't support that. Earlier in this thread we have a January 1951 magazine article on this design, which describes it as being a year old at that point, so the design is c. 1950. The requirement that led to the Tu-95 was issued in 1950 and the design approved in July 1951, so design work was happening in 1950-51, the exact same time that the Douglas design was being developed. It seems very unlikely that the Douglas designers were aware of the Tupolev aircraft's configuration at that time. It's probably a case of parallel requirements using similar technology bases coming up with similar designs.

No one knows that. But yes, a lot of designs and prototypes existed earlier than popular history tells us. The British and the Americans began their spy overflights in 1946. How much of that is declassified?
 

TomS

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This is a Douglas Model D-1211J, one of competitor.
I'm taking that the US got an eye on the Russian's Bear bomber......
Timing doesn't support that. Earlier in this thread we have a January 1951 magazine article on this design, which describes it as being a year old at that point, so the design is c. 1950. The requirement that led to the Tu-95 was issued in 1950 and the design approved in July 1951, so design work was happening in 1950-51, the exact same time that the Douglas design was being developed. It seems very unlikely that the Douglas designers were aware of the Tupolev aircraft's configuration at that time. It's probably a case of parallel requirements using similar technology bases coming up with similar designs.

No one knows that. But yes, a lot of designs and prototypes existed earlier than popular history tells us. The British and the Americans began their spy overflights in 1946. How much of that is declassified?
I'm not at all sure how this is relevant to what I wrote.
 
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