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What might need 41,000 feet of landing strip?

sferrin

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???

You'll note both strips have these turnouts. Were they done in anticipation of the now cancelled Blackswift? (Given it's projected size though you'd think it would have been able to stop in less distance). One of those things that make you go "hmmm".
 

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Sundog

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I thought those curved paths were approach path reference marks for pilots, JIC something went wrong and they had to make a visual approach?
 

sferrin

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Sundog said:
I thought those curved paths were approach path reference marks for pilots, JIC something went wrong and they had to make a visual approach?

Er, I can't think of any other runway that I've seen that has them. Edwards included. On the other hand if you wanted to know exactly what path to follow on a long runout without having to worry if you were going to roll the aircraft over or hit the edge of the lakebed. . .
 

sferrin

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'nother pic.
 

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quellish

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sferrin said:
Sundog said:
I thought those curved paths were approach path reference marks for pilots, JIC something went wrong and they had to make a visual approach?

Er, I can't think of any other runway that I've seen that has them. Edwards included. On the other hand if you wanted to know exactly what path to follow on a long runout without having to worry if you were going to roll the aircraft over or hit the edge of the lakebed. . .

Actually, the shuttle uses something called the Heading Alignment Cylinder (or Cone, depending on who you ask) for lining up on the runway. While this is supposed to "virtual", I do believe the Edwards lakebed at one point had it drawn out.
http://www.orbiterwiki.org/wiki/Heading_Alignment_Cone
It is also not uncommon on dry lakebed runways to paint a compass rose or other VFR aid. Edwards has had these for some time.
http://www.dreamlandresort.com/info/edwardssat.htm


As far as needing 41,000 feet of landing strip.... During most of the year the portions of the DET 3 runway that are on the lakebed are unusable due to flooding. The lakebed itself really isn't used as much as it once was, in fact what looks on overhead photos to be the main runway (14R/32L) is in fact closed and now only used as a taxiway to the new runways. 14L/32R, the newer runway, does have an overrun that goes up to the smaller "hook" you see on the lakebed, but that is only because any overrun would use lakebed whose condition is seasonal. The actual usable length of both runways (new and old) at any time is under 10,000 feet.
 

Orionblamblam

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Runway extensions to existing runways out in the middle of nowhere are relatively cheap. Much less expensive than, say, the confusion and new expendature on intel that other nations might have to cough up to figure out what the runway is for, and waste resources on develping a counter to.
 

sferrin

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quellish said:
Actually, the shuttle uses something called the Heading Alignment Cylinder (or Cone, depending on who you ask) for lining up on the runway. While this is supposed to "virtual", I do believe the Edwards lakebed at one point had it drawn out.
http://www.orbiterwiki.org/wiki/Heading_Alignment_Cone
It is also not uncommon on dry lakebed runways to paint a compass rose or other VFR aid. Edwards has had these for some time.
http://www.dreamlandresort.com/info/edwardssat.htm


As far as needing 41,000 feet of landing strip.... During most of the year the portions of the DET 3 runway that are on the lakebed are unusable due to flooding. The lakebed itself really isn't used as much as it once was, in fact what looks on overhead photos to be the main runway (14R/32L) is in fact closed and now only used as a taxiway to the new runways. 14L/32R, the newer runway, does have an overrun that goes up to the smaller "hook" you see on the lakebed, but that is only because any overrun would use lakebed whose condition is seasonal. The actual usable length of both runways (new and old) at any time is under 10,000 feet.

So if all they are ever using is 10,000 feet why go through the bother of marking out overruns? Also it's not like the marked overruns are anything like the norm you'd see on any other runway. They go for literally MILES. There was one instance where a B-1B got it's wings stuck full-back and it had to land like that so they had it land on the lakebed at Edwards and even it didn't come close to what's marked out here.
 

Rosdivan

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sferrin said:
quellish said:
Actually, the shuttle uses something called the Heading Alignment Cylinder (or Cone, depending on who you ask) for lining up on the runway. While this is supposed to "virtual", I do believe the Edwards lakebed at one point had it drawn out.
http://www.orbiterwiki.org/wiki/Heading_Alignment_Cone
It is also not uncommon on dry lakebed runways to paint a compass rose or other VFR aid. Edwards has had these for some time.
http://www.dreamlandresort.com/info/edwardssat.htm


As far as needing 41,000 feet of landing strip.... During most of the year the portions of the DET 3 runway that are on the lakebed are unusable due to flooding. The lakebed itself really isn't used as much as it once was, in fact what looks on overhead photos to be the main runway (14R/32L) is in fact closed and now only used as a taxiway to the new runways. 14L/32R, the newer runway, does have an overrun that goes up to the smaller "hook" you see on the lakebed, but that is only because any overrun would use lakebed whose condition is seasonal. The actual usable length of both runways (new and old) at any time is under 10,000 feet.

So if all they are ever using is 10,000 feet why go through the bother of marking out overruns? Also it's not like the marked overruns are anything like the norm you'd see on any other runway. They go for literally MILES. There was one instance where a B-1B got it's wings stuck full-back and it had to land like that so they had it land on the lakebed at Edwards and even it didn't come close to what's marked out here.

Quite probably its just to screw with people's minds, case in point.
 

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