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Paulhan-Pillard / SPCA aircraft

Jemiba

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Neither the Fairchild XC-120, nor the SIAI-Marchetti SM-105 was a new idea:
Here's a proposal for such an aircraft from 1929, made by the Société Provencale
de Construction Aéronautique (SPCA), intended especially for medical evacuation:
(from L'Aeronautique 7/1929)
 

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Skybolt

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VERY interesting, I'm readying an article on detachable pods transports...
 

GTX

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Skybolt said:
VERY interesting, I'm readying an article on detachable pods transports...
That would be an interesting article - what is it from if I may ask?

Regards,

Greg
 

Caravellarella

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Dear Jemiba, here is a article in French about the SPCA 70 air-ambulance pack-plane "project" of 1927......

The article comes from the 15th March 1969 issue of Aviation Magazine International......

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

Tophe

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So, Fairchild seems to have copied the French to 'invent' the XC-120, so... the French copied the Fairchild C-82 to 'invent' the Noratlas? Without any Copyright in either direction? No patent? Twin-boom illegality?
 

Grey Havoc

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Tophe said:
So, Fairchild seems to have copied the French to 'invent' the XC-120, so... the French copied the Fairchild C-82 to 'invent' the Noratlas? Without any Copyright in either direction? No patent? Twin-boom illegality?
I could be wrong, but I'd say independent development.
 

Stargazer2006

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Tophe said:
So, Fairchild seems to have copied the French to 'invent' the XC-120, so... the French copied the Fairchild C-82 to 'invent' the Noratlas? Without any Copyright in either direction? No patent? Twin-boom illegality?
And Tophe copied them ALL to make his crazy airplanes!!!
 

hesham

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My dear Caravellarella,

thank you for that great info,and in your picture,the SPCA 50 was a project
for patrol recce flying boat,intended to compete Latecoere-380 Bis and
Latecoere-381,Breguet-Short Trimotor and Villiers-23,the later was a
project,I spoke about it before;

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,395.msg6247/highlight,villiers+320.html#msg6247
 

Stargazer2006

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Once they had turned the Schneider works at Le Creusot into the SPCN (Société Provençale de Constructions Navales), the French Messageries Maritimes company launched the SPCA (Société Provençale de Constructions Aéronautiques) on June 12, 1925; the head of the company estimated that seaplane operation was a natural extension of maritime ship routes.

Taking up the project of engineer Conflenti from CAMS, the SPCA had two Météore 63 aircraft built in Meudon by the Letord company. These were assembled at La Ciotat, along with a third example built in 1928.

Following the 1926 naval competition at Saint-Raphaël, the Météore was to become the first seaplane to receive a certificate of airworthiness for public transport in the first category (maritime routes over 500 kms). The Météore was assigned to the Marseille-Alger (Marseilles-Algiers) route and sank in Algiers on its first flight (being later replaced on the same route by the #2 Météore).

The Météore was then piloted by Maurice Noguès to inaugurate Air Union's oriental line to Beirut.

Other all-metal aircraft (torpedo seaplanes, mail transports and bomber prototype) were then developed by the team of Paulhan-Pillard, with a few accidents along the way. All in all only nine seaplanes and a few landplanes were produced by SPCA.
 

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Stargazer2006

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The SPCA 30 was a multiplace combat design that was built in two examples in 1930, the first powered by two 600 hp Lorraine engines, the second by two 600 hp Hispano-Suiza engines. The engineer who studied the aircraft died before its construction. Another engineer took over, but unfortunately the perfomance of the type during tests was less than satisfactory.

The aircraft's only remarkable performance, if somewhat accidental, took place on August 7, 1931 at Villacoublay, before a select audience made up of Marshal Philippe Pétain and the Aeronautical commission of the French House of Parliament. After a low pass with one engine at low regime and the other at full throttle, the pilot decided to go at full throttle on both engines, only to find the two fuselages vibrating heavily. The vibration was so strong that his attempts to immobilize the rudder resulted in both his shoes being shredded, with part of the stirrup perforating his left foot. A tear even appeared in the port fuselage, but after reducing engine power the vibrations subsided. The crew considered ejecting, but then realized that they were flying at less than 100 meters above a wood that separated the runway from the golf course.

After a flight at higher altitude, the crew had to make a forced landing on a tank operating field at Trappes, and as the aircraft didn't have any brakes then, it ended up muddled in a four-meter deep trench. The propellers and landing gear had to be repaired on the spot and the aircraft had to take off from a 250-meter long space, facing a row of poplar trees.

The C.E.V. (Centre d'Essais en Vol) requested that further development be pursued on the prototypes to address a problem of centering, but this didn't work out and the type had to be abandoned.
 

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Stargazer2006

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The SPCA Type 90 was a larger, trimotor derivative of the SPCA 80 colonial aircraft, and was entered in a 1932 competition for colonial trimotors. Like all other aircraft of this type, it had to be a multipurpose machine, capable of performing a variety of rather dissimilar tasks. First flown on December 8, 1932 at Istres, the aircraft confirmed the company's expectations. It remained stable even without the pilot's grabbing the controls. On December 23, it was registered F-AKFJ.

The French government awarded nine contracts for a total of 13 prototypes to be delivered to the Ministry of Colonies. The market for the SPCA IX Type 90 Col 3 amounted to FF 2,795,000 out of the 36,155,000 total. All were all high-wing monoplanes except for the Weymann Type 66 biplane. All were powered by radial engines, which were more sturd, less heavy and more easily maintained than the water-cooled types.

The SPCA Type 90, which had been developed under the guidance of engineer Redon, received the highest grades and finished first in the competition. Apart from the strict colonial work, it was liable to be used as a troop transport for 14 men, their weapons and their packages. In its strictly sanitary version, it could carry 10 men, six on stretchers and four sitting.

In April 1933, the aircraft was taken to Villacoublay, beginning a new test phase at the STAé in May. After three days of testing it was handed over to the GAN (Groupe des Avions Nouveaux, or New Airplanes Group). After the 350 hp Gnome-Rhône Titan engines received Townsend cowlings to reduce drag, the SPCA started in September a new series of tests in the hands of state pilots Barrucand and Bogard. At the end of the year, the aircraft was fitted with Messier propeller brakes to be used in case of engine failure.

On January 30, 1934, the SPCA 90 escaped a severe accident. When the port engine tore apart and flipped back 180 degrees, it made a breach into the cockpit area. Pilot Jacques Lecarme kept his cool and asked his passengers to jump for fear that the wing was going to tear off. Yet the aircraft managed to land safely, emphasizing the sturdiness of Redon's design.

Fitted with a new engine mount and vertical rudder, the SPCA 90 was sent on April 25 to the new CEMA (which replaced both the STAé and GAN) and parked in the "Guynemer" hangar. Unfortunately, no production of the type (or any other colonial type, for that matter) ensued, despite its proven qualities.


Translated/adapted from Aviation Magazine.
 

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Apophenia

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Great collection -- thanks Stéphane! On my designation list, I show the SPCA 80 fitted with a lower-power 300 hp Titan-Major (Gnome-Rhône 7Kb). Is that an error?

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,18695.0.html
 

Stargazer2006

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Apophenia said:
On my designation list, I show the SPCA 80 fitted with a lower-power 300 hp Titan-Major (Gnome-Rhône 7Kb). Is that an error?
All I can say is that I copied these pictures directly from the engine company's inhouse publication, so at least the info underneath the pictures is meant to be reliable (unless it was wishful thinking on the part of Gnome-Rhône, which is also possible). Now the funny thing here is that they refer to the power of the engine using the "HP" unit instead of the usual "CV" found in those magazines... The two units supposedly mean the same but are in fact a little different, so perhaps 300 CV and 350 HP would be the same? Can anyone help with this unit thing?
 

Stargazer2006

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Also, just realized that the construction photo had a caption referring to the SPCA VII (SPCA 40), not the SPCA 80. I'm reposting the picture separately here instead.
 

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Apophenia

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Stargazer2006 said:
More material on the SPCA Météore 63, which is also designated as the E-5 in the Popular Aviation article attached below...
Curiouser and curiouser ... Photos of the E-5 seemed to show the SPCA 10 :eek:

On horsepower and CV (for cheval fiscal versus ch for cheval vapeur): The two measures are almost identical -- HP being roughly 98% of CV. So, rounded up, 350 HP equals 355 CV while 300 HP equals 304 CV.
 

Stargazer2006

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Here is a set of pictures which I saved from the web and that once were for sale.

The JPG samples had watermarks all over so I had to do some heavy work cleaning them, and in a few cases I had to figure out what the missing details could be. Because this is only tentative, I cannot swear on their accuracy, so I'm also attaching the "originals" for comparison.
  • SPCA III type 30 combat multiplace - 1st example flying at Istres
  • SPCA 90 colonial trimotor first flown at Istres on Dec. 8, 1932
  • SPCA T-3 BN4 (Type Paulhan-Pillard) assembly (2 pictures)
 

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Stargazer2006

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Apophenia said:
Stargazer2006 said:
More material on the SPCA Météore 63, which is also designated as the E-5 in the Popular Aviation article attached below...
Curiouser and curiouser ... Photos of the E-5 seemed to show the SPCA 10 :eek:

On horsepower and CV (for cheval fiscal versus ch for cheval vapeur): The two measures are almost identical -- HP being roughly 98% of CV. So, rounded up, 350 HP equals 355 CV while 300 HP equals 304 CV.
My fault! I got mixed up on this one. OF COURSE the article is about the E-5, which WAS the SPCA 10 (also known as the Paulhan-Pillard flying boat). I removed the image and am reposting it here, along with a poster of the same. Sorry again about the blunder.


I have also added a picture of the SPCA 30 in the first page...
 

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hesham

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Jemiba said:
Neither the Fairchild XC-120, nor the SIAI-Marchetti SM-105 was a new idea:
Here's a proposal for such an aircraft from 1929, made by the Société Provencale
de Construction Aéronautique (SPCA), intended especially for medical evacuation:
(from L'Aeronautique 7/1929)

Also from Les Ailes journal.


http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6555794t/f3.image
 

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hesham

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Jemiba said:
Neither the Fairchild XC-120, nor the SIAI-Marchetti SM-105 was a new idea:
Here's a proposal for such an aircraft from 1929, made by the Société Provencale
de Construction Aéronautique (SPCA), intended especially for medical evacuation:
(from L'Aeronautique 7/1929)

With more info,from the same source.
 

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hesham

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Also from l'Aeronautique 1932,


the little known variant,SPCA-91T airliner.
 

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hesham

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Jemiba said:
Neither the Fairchild XC-120, nor the SIAI-Marchetti SM-105 was a new idea:
Here's a proposal for such an aircraft from 1929, made by the Société Provencale
de Construction Aéronautique (SPCA), intended especially for medical evacuation:
(from L'Aeronautique 7/1929)
And from Italian Aeronautic.

http://www.avia-it.com/act/biblioteca/periodici/PDF%20Riviste/Aeronautica/L'Aeronautica%201932%2002.pdf
 

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blackkite

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Hi! SPCA-20 prototype torpedo bomber.
http://www.airwar.ru/enc/bww1/spca20.html
"The program for the development of bombers and torpedo bombers of naval aviation, which was launched in 1927, required the creation of seaplanes of two types: for operations on the high seas and in the coastal zone.
In accordance with the requirements of the program for action on the high seas, six aircraft were created: four-engine Bernard H 340, SAB AB 21, Latécoère 550 and two-engine Farman 311, CMS 60 and SPCA II (they can be supplemented with LeO 204, which was installed on floats LeO 203 ). All these aircraft were contracted, but most of these seaplanes were unsuccessful.
The SPCA II (or SPCA PP 20), developed by the Marseilles company in collaboration with Alphonse Tellier, had an advanced design for float seaplanes performing the functions of bombers and torpedo bombers. "

"France's Navy headquarters refused to accept the aircraft for service. As in the case of the SPCA II, the engines were mounted too close to the thick wing, becoming some kind of air brakes.
The emphasis in the program of creating seaplane torpedo planes was shifted towards single-engine coastal class vehicles, one of which - Latécoère 290 - was put into serial production. None of the seaplanes for operations on the high seas has been put into serial production."

"Wing span : m 26.22, Length : m 18. 62, Height : m 6.40, Wing area : m2 123.00,
Weight : kg empty aircraft 4300, normal take-off 7300
engine's type : 2 PD Gnome-Rhône 9 Ae , Power : hp 2 x 480, Maximum speed : km / h 180 , Cruising speed : km / h 165
Practical range : km 1200 , Practical ceiling : m 5000, Crew : people 4
Armament : only planned
 

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hesham

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Hi,

does anyone hear about Paulhan-Pillard Type 10,12 & 17 of 1927 ?.

http://www.acam.asso.fr/histo/premiers_equipements6.php
 
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