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Patriot SAM replacement

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If it rotated why would you need three arrays?
instant situational awareness, critical for hypersonic threats and orientation main mast always on the most dangerous direction
imho azimuth turn ability is necessary (as on legacy radar)

 
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bring_it_on

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As per Raytheon is not a mock-up and an actual prototype in support of the program. The article posted earlier goes into how the stabilization mechanism is different (relevant portion quoted below). I would not call this a massive radar from a logistical or mobility perspective (relative to what it is replacing). Yes it is about 2.5 meters longer than the legacy radar but you get quite a bit in return for that. And the radar meets the Army's required mobility needs and utilizes the same movers and air-lift compared to the radar it is replacing. A large GaN AESA antenna on a high performance radar is going to consume a lot of power and is going to require a lot of cooling when it is in this frequency range. There are very limited options to avoid that. You can go for a more efficient lower frequency radar, reduce the volume search, range, and other performance requirements, or use a rotating radar to achieve 360 degree. The Army had made it clear that it was not willing to compromise on performance for the sake of 360 degree coverage so Raytheon needed to achieve both as the Congress inserted a 360-degree language in the NDAA and even though the Army did not specify a 360 degree sensor it was quite clear that they would want one that could at the very least grow to meet that requirement. One way they could have made it smaller is by placing the CEU on a separate mover like they do on the TPY-2 but that would have probably not met mobility or operational needs and would have increased the airlift requirement.

The radar that Raytheon specifically designed for the Army uses next-generation gallium nitride technology and is 7 feet longer but 11 inches more narrow than the radar unit. But it no longer requires outrigger stabilizing legs. Rather, the system is held stable by jacks underneath, which means its takes up less space on the sides, according to Bob Kelley, Raytheon’s director of domestic integrated air and missile defense programs for business development and strategy.
If it rotated why would you need three arrays?
No it does not need to rotate - that is the entire point of developing a staring sensor. Raytheon has disclosed that the rear panels are designed to offer more than 2x the search range of the current Patriot radar which would be plenty of rear sector performance given the LTAMDS mission. They are sized to perform the full spectrum of PATRIOT's mission. There will also be other sensors operating as part of the PATRIOT battalion and within the broader IAMD fold covering other vectors and airspace. I did reach out to a Raytheon team member to see if the radar can slew and whether that capability will be carried over from the legacy sensor into the fielded LTAMDS sensors. Haven't heard back but I would be highly surprised if the final variant of their sensor doesn't offer that capability in some shape or form. There is some indication that the ability to slew is built into the design and may show up in the final delivered product..
 

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sferrin

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No it does not need to rotate - that is the entire point of developing a staring sensor.
Yeah, it was a rhetorical question. :) With three arrays you get 360 coverage at all times albeit more range in the direction the large array is staring.
 

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I`m almost surprised that they just didnt come up with a railroad locomotive style turntable setup that the existing radar trailer could just be parked on and physically rotated instead.
It was a conscious decision on Raytheon's part not to go with a rotating design which would have been much simpler, cheaper but would not have performed as well. Raytheon on a number of occasions have commented that they discarded a rotator as they deemed it to be inadequate to best meet the performance requirements the US Army had set for them. They chose to go with a full mission spectrum simultaneous 360-degree capability. Hence the substantial increase in size of the rear panels compared to to what they had planned on the PATRIOT AESA upgrade or what their competition appears to have proposed. I think the question that still needs to be answered is whether this sensor can be slewed. Hopefully that will be known soon.
 
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Mark S.

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A work in progress. Slide 4 shows a more complete trailer but in it the unit is bolted to it to prevent it from being slewed. The jacks showed are the crank down variety used on the typical over the road semi trailers and the forward rails seem small when compared to the 3-axle design of the rear. Raytheon builds radars and does it well. I'm sure they'll get someone to clean up the trailer design.
 

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A work in progress.
I thought it was obvious that this was a prototype and same would be the case with the 6 that are to be delivered to the US Army for fielding by late 2022 following which production decision would be made for follow on orders. There are graphics where the rear assembly is not bolted, hence why I dropped a query to them to clarify this point as they would have insight into what the final configuration is likely to be. They have a pretty good team on this radar and beat some of the top radar suppliers on the planet. I'm sure they know how trailers work. At the end of the day, the design represents something built to meet or exceed requirements so there is Army influence on this as well. If the Army wants the sensor to slew, like its predecessor, that's what they'll deliver.
 
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bring_it_on

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Posting this here since 3DELRR is expected to be IBCS compatible (and has been previously discussed in this thread)..It seems that Lockheed with the TPY-X, Northrop Grumman with a TPS-80 derivative, and possible even Raytheon with a SPY-6 (V)2 derivative could offer something that may interest the USAF...Possible foreign off-the shelf radars as well via partnership with US OEM's..

AIR FORCE TO TERMINATE RAYTHEON'S 3DELRR CONTRACT

The Air Force plans to cancel a contract with Raytheon to develop the Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar due to "numerous technical and supplier challenges."

"The Air Force is changing its acquisition strategy for the Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar (3DELRR) program and will take actions to conclude its current engineering and manufacturing development contract with Raytheon," Air Force spokeswoman Patty Welsh told Inside Defense today.

The service originally chose Raytheon as the 3DELRR prime contract in 2014, but Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman -- both of whom made failing bids for the project -- protested the award. Then, when the Air Force opted to take corrective action to re-start the bidding process, Raytheon protested the service's decision. The compounding protests resulted in a nearly three-year program pause that culminated with a new contract to Raytheon in 2017.

The Air Force didn't expand on the nature of the technical challenges Raytheon experienced and didn't immediately provide details on when the contract will be officially terminated, but the Government Accountability Office raised concerns in a 2018 report that a "lack of technical readiness" was delaying the program and highlighted software development risks. The Air Force expected it would cost more than $1.3 billion to develop and produce 35 radar systems.

Raytheon said in a statement to Inside Defense it continues to work with the service to overcome the program's challenges.

"We are aware of the Air Force's position and share their concerns with the challenges facing the 3DELRR program," the company said. "We have been working closely with the Air Force to resolve these issues, and continue to support the U.S. Air Force with their efforts."

The service had previously expected the program to reach initial operational capability in 2023 and full operational capability in 2029. Under the new strategy, Welsh said, the service will use Middle Tier Acquisition authorities to reach IOC for the capability "no later than FY-24."

The program office, based out of Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, will host an industry day Feb. 4, and is asking radar developers to pitch production-ready systems to participate in a forthcoming demonstration. Welsh said the service will release a solicitation soon after the event. The service is referring to the rapid acquisition effort as "SpeedDealer."

"Current market research shows that due to advancements in technology, other alternatives are now available that can deliver the capability faster," Welsh said. "The Air Force believes there is technology that will allow for demonstration of production-ready systems within the next nine months."

3DELRR is meant to replace the Air Force's legacy AN/TPS-75 and serve as its primary ground-based sensor for long-range surveillance, detection and tracking. -- Courtney Albon
 
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bring_it_on

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LTFI seems to be funded. Here are the FY-21 activities for which funding is requested (schedule attached) -

- Continue execution of concept definitions through Other Transactions Agreements (OTA)
-Continue Modeling & Simulation development for enhanced system effectiveness assessment
-Provide program support in the development and execution of the Analysis of Alternatives (AoA)
-Initiate Prototyping activities for high risk technology

RFP out in 2023, and single vendor down-select a year later..
 

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bring_it_on

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Lockheed has confirmed to Inside Defense that it has submitted its bid for the 3DELRR SpeedDealer with its TPY-X which is an upgraded version of what it had initially offered to the USAF. Posting it here because of the 3DELRR requirement for IBCS compatibility.

 

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SpeedDealer demonstration participants chosen

HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. – As the Air Force moves forward with its new acquisition strategy for the Three-Dimensional Expeditionary Long-Range Radar, the program office here selected three companies May 8 to participate in a rapid prototyping program to demonstrate expeditionary radar performance this summer.

The Lockheed Martin Corp. and the Northrop Grumman Corp. will participate under Other Transaction Agreements, and CEA Technologies, an Australian firm, will demonstrate their system through a Foreign Comparative Test project award.

3DELRR will be the principal Air Force ground-based sensor for long-range surveillance, detection and tracking of aerial targets in support of theater commanders and will replace the AN/TPS-75. The program office canceled a delayed development contract late last year, after determining that production-ready systems were available that could deliver the capability faster. The first step in the new strategy is this SpeedDealer demonstration that will allow the Air Force to assess the military utility of the systems to perform the 3DELRR mission.

“Based on our successful industry day in early February, we released a solicitation March 2 for companies to support our new aggressive strategy,” said Lt. Col. Matthew Judge, materiel leader. “We are excited to see what these three systems can do.”

Program office personnel requested responses to the solicitation by April 1, but extended the deadline to April 15 due to the pandemic. In less than one month’s time, the team evaluated all received proposals and made the selections.

Each award provides $500,000 for the companies to demonstrate their radar system’s capabilities, maintenance concepts and radar performance against operationally-relevant targets and conditions, no later than the end of September. Following the demonstration, a system that successfully completes the event may be selected for integration, and potentially production, contracts by the end of this calendar year.

By using a contracting mechanism known as an Other Transaction Authority, the team has greater flexibility in executing the SpeedDealer demonstration and streamlining the transition to follow-on production. The use of the Foreign Comparative Test program, a congressionally-approved authority, allows the Defense Department to test and acquire technologies from designated foreign sources to satisfy U.S. military needs.

“We are not starting over; this is not a new development contract,” said Col. Michael Harm, 3DELRR’s senior materiel leader. “Through the information presented during our industry day and received in the companies’ response to the solicitation, we were able to confirm that production-ready systems can be demonstrated this year.”

The Air Force anticipates a production-ready radar could reach initial operational capability by late fiscal year ’24.

“Our air control squadrons need this important capability, and this strategy will accelerate delivering it to them,” said Har
 
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