Patriot SAM replacement

bring_it_on

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It is an interesting direction for IBCS's export customers like Poland who are looking to also field a complementary short range system. With G/ATOR and CAMM IBCS integration possible or being explored it does give competition to the likes of NASAMS and Spyder or Iron-Dome, particularly if they can demonstrate the ability to rapidly integrate indigenous C2 and sensors.
 

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Lower Tier Future Interceptor Program - New start for FY20 -

The Lower Tier Future Interceptor program will provide improved operational effectiveness against evolving air and missile defense threats within the lower tier portion of the ballistic missile defense battlespace. The future interceptor will increase Air and Missile Defense (AMD) capability through increased velocity, altitude and maneuverability. The acquisition program will competitively select a future interceptor to complement existing Air and Missile Defense (AMD) capabilities to overmatch evolving threat.
 

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Original LTAMDS program fades, focus now: 'Sense-Off' top-10 capabilities


The Army has formalized plans with Raytheon and Lockheed Martin to wind down by September the original Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) program of record, a key part of the service's pivot toward a new approach to accelerate the fielding of a Patriot radar replacement by 2022 through a “Sense-Off” competition beginning in May.

On March 12, just as the Pentagon was unveiling its fiscal year 2020 budget request, the Army executed contracts with Raytheon and Lockheed Martin that effectively extend LTAMDS concept development deals first awarded in 2017. This marks a dramatic narrowing of the scope of the LTAMDS program of record from expectations set in late September, when the two companies were selected by the Army to proceed from the concept-development phase to what was expected to be a technology-maturation and risk-reduction phase.

A representative from one of the companies said there was no expectation the Army would extend the contract after the end of the current fiscal year. “That program is likely to sunset here at some point,” the person said.

In late 2017, the Army awarded four companies -- Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Technovative Applications -- concept-development contracts to perform risk-reduction work on the planned LTAMDS sensor.

Last September, the Army selected only two companies to proceed into the TMRR phase of the program -- Raytheon and Lockheed Martin. That program of record was accompanied by a schedule that assumed initial operational capability in 2027, a date that did not sit well with Congress. Lawmakers adopted a provision in the Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act to fence half of LTAMDS funding if the Army advances an acquisition strategy for a new 360-degree sensor system that proposes a target date for initial operational fielding after Dec. 31, 2023.

In late October, to the surprise of many in industry, the Army unveiled plans for a “Sense-Off” event in May and June of 2019 that charted a course to initial fielding of an LTAMDS capability by 2022, a development that effectively opened the program again to competition and led many to believe the service would proceed with two, parallel LTAMDS efforts.

The combination of the recent LTAMDS contract options with the two defense contractors and the FY-20 budget request make clear the “Sense Off” is now the dominant focus of the service's new radar acquisition effort.

The service is seeking $427 million for LTAMDS in FY-20, an increase of 240 percent compared to the FY-19 forecast of $125 million the service would seek in FY-20 for the new sensor.

On April 22, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman are required to deliver their respective LTAMDS candidate radars to White Sands Missile Range, NM, in preparation for each demonstrating their sensor against a series of targets in May and June.

The Army, according to a little-noticed briefing slide made public in January, has ranked 10 capabilities that it wants in an LTAMDS radar. First is the ability to defend against tactical ballistic missiles; second is defense against anti-radiation missions and anti-surface missiles; third is non-tactical ballistic missile defense; fourth is “full-sectored” defense; fifth is electronic protection; sixth is “kill assessment/interceptor” support; seventh is operations and sustainment; eighth is training; ninth is emplacement accuracy; and 10th is “mass attack."
 

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Army launches new-start Lower Tier Future Interceptor program


The Army wants to launch a new-start Future Interceptor program in fiscal year 2020, a milestone development for the service's lower-tier missile enterprise that envisions a possible follow-on to the Patriot missile, setting the stage for a major competition to provide a new air-and-missile-defense interceptor.

The service's FY-20 budget request includes $8 million for a new-start Lower Tier Future Interceptor program that the Army says will "complement" existing air and missile defense capabilities. The Army budget request forecasts $232 million in research and development funding through FY-24 to advance the new program.

"The Lower-Tier Future Interceptor program will provide improved operational effectiveness against evolving air and missile threats within the lower-tier portion of the ballistic missile defense battlespace," the Army budget documents state.

"The future interceptor will increase Air and Missile Defense capability through increased velocity, altitude, and maneuverability. The acquisition program will competitively select a future interceptor to complement existing Air and Missile Defense capabilities to overmatch evolving threat [sic]," according to the budget.

The Army plans in FY-20 to develop an analysis of alternatives and begin working "on the competitive concept developments" using other transaction authorities, the service's research, development, test and evaluation budget justification document states.

"To provide improved operational effectiveness, the Army will use the Defense Ordnance Technology Consortium OTA to execute a competitive initial concept development (CD) with multiple contractors," the budget document reads.

"From the CD phase, rapid prototype development approaches will utilize detailed modeling and simulation of the future interceptor as well as conduct prototype development of high-risk hardware technologies," the document adds. "The prototype technologies and detailed simulation-based interceptor design will be used to competitively down-select to a single vendor."

While beginning the analysis of alternatives in early 2020 the Army plans, in tandem, to award industry the concept development contracts. These two efforts will then inform work on a capabilities development document that will commence in early 2021.

The service plans a competitive solicitation for the Future Interceptor in March 2022 with contract awards in March 2023, according to the budget request.
 

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A Huntsville company getting ready for the big “Sense Off”


HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- The Patriot surface to air defense missile system earned its early fame in the Gulf War. The latest and best version of the Patriot is the PAC-3, and it is a life saver. It does, however, need a great radar to sense the incoming targets that it will shoot down. That radar is about to get a major upgrade.

"There's going to be a Sense Off," said Bob Kelly, Raytheon’s director for integrated air and missile defense in the company’s Integrated Defense Systems division.

Kelly had a lot to say about the upcoming Sense Off at the recent AUSA Global Force Symposium in Huntsville. The competition at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico was the Army's idea. "They basically said, 'okay industry, you say you are ready to do this, bring your stuff to White Sands Missile Range and prove it,' and that's what we hope to do," said Kelly.

All the competitors to build the radar will get the chance to prove their sensors are the best, and it is not going to be easy. "These are very hard requirements to meet. This is going to be the world's best land-based radar," said Kelly.

It's a ready to make the PAC-3 even more effective. For instance, where the current radar might have one beam, the new radar will have thousands. It will see a lot more of the sky. "And it's going to be able to increase the defended area that air and defense forces have on the battlefield today...significantly," said Bob Kelly.

Soldiers will no doubt appreciate a little more safety when they're in harm's way. They might also like the idea that a competition will pick the winner that will be the new radar. Even the companies that are competing understand this is a great way to choose such an important system. "I'm sure that every industry competitor out there is going to bring a better radar than they ever thought they could, because of the competitive nature of what we're trying to do," said Bob Kelly.

Raytheon is joined in the effort by four Huntsville companies, IERUS Technologies, Kord Technologies, Cummings Aerospace, and nLogic. The Sense Off is scheduled for about a month from now.
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxY-tolQ4V0
 

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Army fielding new ALPS to detect cruise missiles, aircraft, UAS


he Army has begun deploying a new prototype Long-Range Persistent Surveillance passive sensor developed to meet urgent needs from commanders in Europe, the Pacific and U.S. Central Command, launching a two-year campaign to provide improved capability to detect enemy cruise missiles, aircraft as well as unmanned aircraft systems.

Lt. Gen. James Dickinson, head of Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, revealed the modernization project -- launched two years ago in response to a request from U.S. European Command -- in April 3 testimony prepared for the Senate Armed Services strategic forces subcommittee....

ALPS can be configured to meet a particular user's needs, according to the Army. The most common configuration, according to the service, is a transportable, 100-foot trailed tower and a conex-based processing shelter.

Dynetics spokeswoman Kristina Hendrix confirmed today the company is building ALPS, but referred other questions about the sensor to the Army.

Dynetics will install and maintain the ALPS prototype systems, according to Monks.

“ALPS is currently supporting multiple urgent requirements from various combatant commanders,” according to Monks.
 

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So is it a mast mounted IRST? Or a receiving element in some type of passive/bi-static radar system?
 

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marauder2048 said:
So is it a mast mounted IRST? Or a receiving element in some type of passive/bi-static radar system?
I think the number of references to "Long Range" would lead me to the latter while the reference to a persistent capability could also point to an IR based staring sensor though it would be tough to imagine such a system to be able to detect these things at long range in all weather conditions.

Also, hasn't Dynetics been prototyping passive RF capability (PCL etc) for quite a while now?
 

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“Adversaries have demonstrated rapid advances in range and overall missile performance,” said Lt Gen Dickinson. “To meet the demands resulting from the shift to great power competition, we continue to pursue increased capacity within the missile defence area. Russia and China have achieved parity with the US in many cases, and overmatch in others.”
The ALPS’s database reportedly has the capacity to store about 700 different types of targets including Russian cruise missiles used in the Syria conflict, according to media sources.
https://www.janes.com/article/87897/pentagon-confirms-deployment-of-new-passive-sensor
 

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IT’S BRAND-SPANKING NEW


As the world becomes more complex, the need is arising for a new radar. “You can’t just update or redesign an already fielded radar,” said Doug Burgess, program director for Raytheon’s LTAMDS solution. “You really need something brand new if you want to defeat what’s coming down the pike."

That’s why Burgess and his team took a clean-sheet approach to Raytheon’s LTAMDS proposal.

“We started with two thoughts: What does the Army want, and what is the threat? And then we built a new radar around that,” he said.
 
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