I am still kind of surprised that no one has written a story about the $77.13m military construction contract that was awarded as part of the original LRS-B award in 2015.
 
That is interesting flateric, towed decoys for the B-21 but until more information comes out we will probably never know for sure.
 
Chaff and Flares for the B-21? The B-2 never had either Chaff or Flares to defend itself instead it relied on pure Stealth. So I would think the same would be true for the B-21.
You don't understand the mission requirements. It has stealthy Chaff and low observable Flares.
 

B-21 Raider continues flight test, production

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CA, UNITED STATES
05.22.2024

Following its formal unveiling, Dec. 2, 2022, the B-21 Raider began flight testing here where it continues to make progress toward becoming the backbone of the U.S. Air Force bomber fleet.

On May 8, 2024, during testimony at the Senate Armed Services committee, Andrew Hunter, Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, highlighted B-21 flight testing is on track to meet timelines and deliver to the warfighter.

“We are in the flight test program, the flight test program is proceeding well,” said Hunter in response to a question about the B-21 program. “It is doing what flight test programs are designed to do, which is helping us learn about the unique characteristics of this platform, but in a very, very effective way.”

Hunter explained this is the first aircraft that is more digital than not, which contributes to the program meeting requirements.

The B-21 is a long-range, highly survivable, penetrating strike stealth bomber that will incrementally replace the B-1 and B-2 bombers and will play a major role supporting national security objectives and assuring U.S. allies and partners across the globe.

The B-21 weapon system is manufactured under the Air Force's contract with Northrop Grumman. It is designed with an open systems architecture, enabling rapid insertion of mature technologies, and allowing the aircraft to remain effective as threats evolve over time. The aircraft is expected to enter service in the mid-2020s with a production goal of a minimum of 100 aircraft.

The Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office manages the acquisition program, focusing on making test aircraft as production representative as possible. Test aircraft are built on the same manufacturing line and use the same manning and tooling that will be used in the eventual production.

The AFRCO’s strategy includes building test aircraft as production-representative as possible. Rather than a traditional flight prototype approach, B-21 test aircraft are built including mission systems using the same manufacturing processes and tooling for production aircraft. This approach in development laid the groundwork for production to start more quickly.

When the B-21 enters the service, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, will be the first B-21 main operating base and location of the Formal Training Unit. Whiteman AFB, Missouri, and Dyess AFB, Texas, are the preferred locations for the remaining bases and will receive aircraft as they become available.
 
Oh another thing Smythers was wrong about, it doesn't fly nose up.
 
Oh another thing Smythers was wrong about, it doesn't fly nose up.
The angle seems to be similar to the B-2 for landing but for a flying wing, you have to fly the aircraft to the ground which means forward stick and don't try to flair, you'll just float down the runway in ground effect. I found that out the times I was in the flight simulator at Pico. I tried landing during one sim session with one of our excellent test pilots at the time, the late Kent Crenshaw and Kent told me to flair the aircraft, nope, just floated in ground effect.
 
 
Interesting to note that the artists' rendering looks just about identical to the Cerberus in terms of the visible structure of the aircraft...
looks like they made the side windows a LOT smaller between the time the render was released in June of 2021 and the rollout in December 2022!
 

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Interesting to note that the artists' rendering looks just about identical to the Cerberus in terms of the visible structure of the aircraft...
looks like they made the side windows a LOT smaller between the time the render was released in June of 2021 and the rollout in December 2022!
View attachment 729921
View attachment 729919

You have to hand it too them; their render was totally accurate. They didn’t try to mislead at all, although obviously that angle does not reveal a lot.
 
You have to hand it too them; their render was totally accurate. They didn’t try to mislead at all, although obviously that angle does not reveal a lot.
I agree, it is 1:1 other than the window and markings. My guess is that they had a 3D model that was used for some digital testing or flight simulation, and just decided they they could render it without showing anything sensitive! (unlike the other 3d render they released that was black and had b-2 style windows and no modeled exhaust)
 
Uhhh...censorship or have we swapped something?
View attachment 730492

Lots of weirdness. The angle of the air data probe looks like it changed, and there might be a skin or film over that flush air data sensor array.

The image that Brian Everstine posted also shows panel lines around the air data probe fitting that aren't there in any of the airborne images I've seen. Usually taped or faired over for flight?
 

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