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NASA/Lockheed Martin X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST)

FighterJock

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TomcatViP

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Major remaining parts delivered (look at that nose!):

X-59-quiet-supersonic-27102020-2.jpg

p20-161-03_1-1024x683.jpg

 

TomcatViP

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New milestone with wing skin pannels sealed:

p20-272-232.jpg



The stereoscopic projector mount is not the least interesting in the picture (notice the slaved dual camera set also)...
 

TomcatViP

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Definitely, yes. (great pic- you can see the projected graphics cuts by the operator harm).
 

TomcatViP

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NASA had to determine a target noise level before NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft could be designed to reduce a loud sonic boom to a quiet thump. To do this, NASA used traditional research aircraft to perform a low-boom dive maneuver, as seen here from the cockpit of a NASA F/A-18.

Traditional research aircraft typically produce a disruptive sonic boom when flying supersonic, or faster than sound, but NASA’s low-boom dive maneuver produces a sonic thump, similar to what we envision the X-59 will sound like. This dive reduces the strength of the shockwaves produced and perceived intensity of those shockwaves, making it much quieter for people on the ground.

The low-boom dive is a key tool in NASA’s supersonic research and the Low-Boom Flight Demonstration mission.

View: https://www.facebook.com/nasaarmstrong/videos/293072715583724/
 

Archibald

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Those low sonic-boom designs are supremely ugly. Marcel Dassault must spin in his grave...
 

TomcatViP

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p21-019-01-3600x2400.jpg


In this picture, the black rectangle panels are the air intakes for the environmental control system (ECS) that regulates the temperature, cabin pressure, and air distribution. The silver grate located at the rear of one of the ECS panels is the exhaust — both of these sections are traditionally housed on the underside of the plane. By placing these features on top of the X-59 wing, the wing blocks and prevents the ECS exhaust from interacting with the shock waves on the bottom of the aircraft. This unique design approach to re-shaping the shock wave pattern substantially reduces the sonic boom to more of a sonic “thump” when it reaches the ground.
 

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