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Massive earthquake in Japan...

Grey Havoc

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This is a list of available Japanese robots under consideration for deployment to Fukushima as of early April, 2011. Note that there are some very interesting omissions from the list

Technology of Anti-Disaster Robotics (5) 2011.04.08

Robot Technology Currently Available in Japan


Hajime Asama, Professor, the University of Tokyo

There still does not exist such a versatile robot that it can move around obstacles such as rubble piles, protect oneself from radiation, gather information about one’s surroundings, handle multiple tasks, and so on. However, if we limit the purpose and range of use of robots, the following robots developed in Japan can be applied to the disaster relief at this time.

- Mobile rescue robot: “Quince”, “Kenaf”, “Kohga”, “Soryu”, “HELIOS”, etc. (MEXT*1, NEDO*2 – IRS, Tohoku University, China Institute of Technology, Kyoto University, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Osaka University, etc.)
- Unmanned construction system (MLIT – General contractors)
- Demolition robot (NEDO*2 – Hitachi Construction Machinery)
- Unmanned aerial vehicle (Yamaha, MEXT*2, etc.)
- Disaster monitoring robot (Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding)
- Disaster relief robot (Tokyo Fire Department, NRIFD, etc.)
- Rescue robot: “Enryu” (Tmsuk)
- Underwater robot (Tohoku University, University of Tokyo, Ritsumeikan University, etc.)
- Lunar robot (Tohoku University, JAXA, etc.)
- Active scope camera (Tohoku University)

Autonomous mobile robots developed in “Real World Robot Challenge” can be also utilized for monitoring surroundings. The robotics technologies useful for the nuclear accident and the disaster relief are also listed in the following link.

http://www.openrtm.org/robotcatalog/

(*1 MEXT: Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban Areas )
(*2 NEDO: Project for Strategic Development of Advanced Robotics Elemental Technologies)


http://roboticstaskforce.wordpress.com/english/technology-of-anti-disaster-robotics-5-2011-04-08/
 

Grey Havoc

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Kan's foes persist in pursuing resignation

The Yomiuri Shimbun


Executives of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan, members of the Cabinet and figures from the opposition issued public calls Saturday for Prime Minister Naoto Kan to step down, just two days after a no-confidence motion against the Cabinet was voted down.

Some within Kan's own party are trying to rally DPJ lawmakers to support their efforts to topple the prime minister.

Comments made by Kan during a meeting of DPJ lawmakers held just before the vote were interpreted by some as an indication of his intention to resign soon. At a press conference after the vote, Kan indicated he planned to remain in office for the foreseeable future, which in some quarters was seen as a reversal on his earlier words.

Yoshikatsu Nakayama, a parliamentary secretary of economy, trade and industry and a senior member of a group of DPJ lawmakers led by former Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama, said on a TV Asahi program Saturday morning, "We're determined to hold a general meeting of all Diet members of our party and press the prime minister to resign."

Convening a general meeting of all DPJ members of the House of Representatives and the House of Councillors requires the support of at least one-third of those lawmakers. Nakayama indicated a list of signatures will be submitted to the party leadership early next week.

"We've already collected signatures from more than one-third of our party's lawmakers," Nakayama said on the TV program.

Appearing on the same program and also critical of Kan was Shu Watanabe, chairman of the DPJ's National Rallying and Canvassing Committee and a member of the party's Standing Officers Council.

"What the prime minister said in the meeting of our party's lawmakers prior to the vote on the no-confidence motion was nothing less than a pledge to step down. I don't think he's got much time left," Watanabe said.

From the opposition camp, Nobuteru Ishihara, secretary general of the Liberal Democratic Party, appeared on a BS Asahi TV program Saturday. "We hope to see Prime Minister Kan step down soon, preferably by the end of June," he said.

Asked about potential developments after Kan's resignation should that come to pass, the LDP's No. 2 mentioned two possibilities--an LDP-DPJ grand coalition, or a new DPJ cabinet with cooperation from the LDP.

===

Kan digs in, others speak out

Kan, for his part, reiterated his intention to stay on as leader Saturday.

Kan met with Keisuke Tsumura and Hiranao Honda, both members of the lower house and of Kan's intraparty group, at the prime minister's official residence.

"I'd like to run the government with input from a wide range of people in our party," Kan was quoted as telling the two.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, appearing on a TV Tokyo program on Saturday, said, "Prime Minister Kan has no intention of remaining in office for very long, I believe."

The chief government spokesman denied Kan wants to stay in office until the crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant is stabilized, or even until a planned visit to the White House in September.

"There's a Japan-U.S. summit meeting scheduled for September, but Prime Minister Kan has never said he himself will attend the meeting," Edano said.

On the same program, DPJ Diet Affairs Committee Chairman Jun Azumi seemed to predict Kan's resignation was around the corner. "My impression is that Mr. Kan will make a big decision sometime this summer," Azumi said.

Defense Minister Toshimi Kitazawa, who helped compose a memorandum agreed upon by Kan and Hatoyama before Thursday's vote that helped Kan secure the support of Hatoyama's group, spoke to reporters in Singapore on Friday night. The memorandum, he said, was based "on the assumption the premier would step down."

(Jun. 5, 2011)

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110604003130.htm
 

Grey Havoc

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(Heads up to JAPAN SECURITY WATCH. From JAPAN TODAY:)


Young people sign up as SDF's image soars in disaster aftermath



Think of all the credibility trashed by the March 11 earthquake-tsunami-meltdown. Tokyo Electric Power Company’s is now zero, the government’s not much higher. Distrust and contempt for an intellectual, corporate and power elite seen as having driven Japan into this tragic mess are deep, surly and pervasive. That’s not likely to change soon.

One institution however, not much regarded until now, has seen its luster brighten – the Self-Defense Forces. So impressive have the quiet heroics of servicemen and women been, reports Weekly Playboy (June 13), that young people increasingly at loose ends in a stalled economy have shown a sudden interest in signing up – not simply for lack of something better but as a path to a fulfilling and productive life.

The biggest disaster in Japan’s postwar history generated the biggest SDF deployment in its history – some 100,000 troops, out of a total of 230,000. Within 11 minutes of the quake, the first Maritime SDF helicopters were hovering overhead. Ground forces quickly followed. One enlisted man was celebrating his marriage when the quake struck – he sped to the scene in his wedding finery. Other members had lost family, friends, homes. It didn’t stop them. Nothing did. Apart from the practical services they’re performing, they’re giving a very depressed nation something to admire.

“Never, ever, have I been deployed to any scene so shocking,” Weekly Playboy hears from one four-year veteran. He was in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, searching through rubble for survivors hopefully, corpses if worse came to worst, as it usually did. “I found my first within five minutes, a man in a car, already dead. Since then, I’ve found dozens of bodies. For the first few days, I couldn’t sleep. Some troops were hit really hard, emotionally. Mental health care squads are out making the rounds. Still, compared to what the victims are going through, our suffering is no big deal.”

Weekly Playboy gives its feature an English title: “Should I join the SDF? All about Japan Self-Defense Force for young people.” It poses some basic questions, and offers answers. For example: “Is there bullying in the SDF?” Yes and no, is the answer. There’s no nonsense about the SDF, the magazine’s sources warn. You obey orders, or else. You stifle your complaints, or else. To some, that’s bullying. If it is to you, you’re better off grubbing in the civilian sector.

“Q: If war breaks out, can I quit?” No, you cannot. You can apply for release, which you probably wouldn’t get in wartime. Leaving without it is a punishable violation of the SDF Law. In the SDF, your life isn’t quite your own, in the sense you’re probably used to. Accept that, or look elsewhere.

“Q: I’m physically weak – is that OK?” Yes – to begin with. Don’t worry. The SDF training regimen – pushups, chin-ups, long-distance running, and so on and so on – will mold that body of yours into a fine instrument – if you can stand it.

“Q: How much is the pay?” Not impressive at first sight – average 237,800 yen at age 30 – but there are benefits, including on-base housing, which compensate. Then there are the various increments. One to two thousand yen a day, for example, if you’re unearthing bodies from earthquake rubble.


http://www.japantoday.com/category/kuchikomi-shukan-post/view/young-people-sign-up-as-sdfs-image-soars-in-disaster-aftermath
 

Grey Havoc

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Some more good news for the JSDF:

http://newpacificinstitute.org/jsw/?p=6585
 

Grey Havoc

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‘Magic’ temple soothes Japan’s tsunami survivors

By Christopher Johnson - Special to The Washington Times

10:53 a.m., Wednesday, June 8, 2011




OTSUCHI, Japan | On a misty Sunday morning, a cloud of fog seems to hover like a halo over the temple.

For many locals who come to worship here, the temple seems to have magical powers. The March 11 tsunami rushed up a slope to the steps of the temple grounds and then turned back, dragging thousands of people and buildings with it back into the ocean.

After that, an inferno of exploding fuel from canisters, cars and gasoline stations engulfed most of the town, where local officials said they can confirm the whereabouts of only about 6,400 of the town’s 15,000 residents.

Though flames leapt up the mountainside and scorched the trunks of trees encircling the temple grounds, the fire stopped before reaching the main wooden shrine — which has been periodically rebuilt, according to Shinto custom, for more than 1,000 years.

“No firemen came here to put out the flames. God was protecting the temple,” said Takaaki Goto, 74, a city councilor and former geography teacher who survived the tsunami that killed the mayor and 31 other town officials.

“I’ve heard people say that Japan is a country without God. But if you look around, you can see that God protected many things.”

The tsunami and fire gutted his new home across the street, but his most treasured possession — a small shrine containing the ashes and scrolls of his ancestors, who have been living in Otsuchi since the 17th century — survived.

Like Mr. Goto, many who lost their material possessions are turning to spirituality to comfort them in hard times.

On the other side of Otsuchi, the tsunami blew apart a 35-foot-high wall and obliterated the port, fish processing factories and hundreds of homes in the Ando district. The ocean, attacking in a series of three waves, grew to 50 feet in height, chasing about 130 people up a staircase to the hilltop Inari shrine.

One of the most important buildings in Otsuchi, the shrine complex holds festival gear, including lanterns, masks and the area’s “mikoshi,” a heavy gilded spirit house that residents carry on their shoulders as they chant and parade through town every autumn. The complex is built around giant trees that people have been preserving for centuries.

The tsunami crashed against a concrete wall fortifying the hillside and mangled a guardrail and fence as it climbed the stairwell. Somehow, it stopped at the foot of a passageway lined with traditional lanterns. The ancient trees and shrines, though less than a mile from the ocean, survived intact, seemingly untouched by perhaps the strongest earthquake and tsunami in Japan’s long history.

“I saw everything,” said Toku Juoudate, 74, whose family has been looking after the shrine for 23 generations.

“The tsunami pushed the boats along with it, and the boats tore the roofing off houses. The tsunami swept people away who were standing on rooftops. My son yelled for everybody to come up higher, and we all survived because God protected the temple and turned back the tsunami,” she said.

In a region prone to earthquakes and tsunamis, wise elders have constructed and preserved Shinto shrines, Buddhist temples and Christian churches on slopes and hilltops, which have stayed above the reach of tsunamis in 1896, 1933, 1960 and on March 11 this year.

Among the few intact buildings, they have become havens for evacuees who lost their homes and other worldly possessions. Mrs. Juoudate said 70 of the people who fled to her temple are still sleeping on the tatami mats of a ceremonial meeting hall.

“People are tired and cranky, and they are losing patience and sometimes arguing, because it is crowded and noisy at night with coughing and snoring. But this is a temple, so people are trying to stay peaceful,” she said.

Not every temple, however, has been so lucky. The tsunami swamped the Koganji temple at sea level at the foot of a mountain in the central business area of town. A demolished car lies in the gutted ruins of the temple’s main hall, where flowers and Buddha statues preside over a wasteland of devastation.

Locals say the temple’s keepers did not always follow strict religious codes. Many evacuees died in the temple instead of running up a hillside path through the cemetery behind it.

Tomoko Nakamura, 32, said her parents and grandmother fled from their home across the street to take shelter in the temple. She has not seen them since and continues to search for their bodies, although she knows that they probably were swept out to sea.

Staying at a shelter on higher ground a few miles from the sea, she goes back to the site of her home almost every day. Nothing remains except a traditional “Kura” storehouse made of stone, dating back to before Japan’s modernization in the 19th century.

Though the waves toppled tombstones, she believes her ancestors are resting peacefully in a large grave site of a cemetery, dating back more than 300 years, next to the Koganji temple.

Like many Japanese, she worships her ancestors, especially during the Bon festival in August, when ancestors come home to visit the living. She said Otsuchi always will be her home, even if she and her new husband end up moving elsewhere for work.

In a rainstorm just hours before the fall of darkness in a town without electricity, she stood in the space that used to be her family room, waiting for her parents and grandmother to return to hold her and speak to her.

“I am not scared of coming here,” she said, the lone soul in the charred ruins of the town. “My ancestors are all here to protect me.”


http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/jun/8/magic-temple-soothes-tsunami-survivors/
 

Grey Havoc

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Tohoku Earthquake: The Coast Guard’s Response

BY James Simpson– June 9, 2011
Posted in: analysis, disaster relief, domestic ops, featured, Japan Coast Guard, search and rescue, Tohoku Earthquake, traditional press



Following on from the article in June edition of the magazine Sekai no Kansen (Ships of the World), a loyal Japan Security Watch reader, who occasionally produces translations of Japanese magazine articles, forwarded on a follow-up article from the July 2011 edition entitled “Rescue Operations of Japan Coast Guard (JCG) in the Great East Japan Earthquake.” The article was written by Toru Takikawa, a former editor for the Mainichi Shimbun. The Coast Guard have not received the same attention as the SDF, despite being involved in the search and rescue efforts – partly this is due to them being far off shore and underwater, invisible to reporters on the ground, but also because they are far fewer in number. Nevertheless, like the SDF in the region and nationally, the JCG responded to the quake with a lot of hardware and personnel. Excerpts from the translation follow.

* * *

A magnitude 9.0 earthquake occurred on 11 March at 14:46. Tsunami advisory and warnings were issued across the nation and the JCG dispatched ships and aircraft in all regions simultaneously. As several regions lifted the warnings and advisories, JCG shifted the focus of their operation to the most devastated area, the Tohoku region.

As of 10 May, the JCG response force includes 54 vessels — 33 patrol ships, 17 patrol boats, 1 aids to navigation vessel, and 3 hydrographic survey vessels; and 19 aircraft — 4 fixed wings and 15 helicopters. There are 6 members from the special rescue team, 6 members from the mobile rescue team, and 4 from the national strike team currently supporting the relief efforts. Total invested forces (work days) since 11 Marchis: 3279 patrol vessels, 1169 aircraft, 470 members from the special rescue team, 460 members from the mobile rescue team, and 244 from the national strike team.

Since the disaster, the JCG rescued 360 people to date (10 May). The teams have recovered 201 bodies. Furthermore, 449 drifting vessels were searched for survivors, and 70 were retrieved/towed back to various ports.

The JCG also patrols around the borders of the restricted water space surrounding Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The JCG provided disaster relief support by delivering various supplies, food, and water via ships and aircraft. The JCG also provided shelter for evacuees at two of the regional headquarters and supplied blankets and food.

Due to the severe damages to main roads, primary access to some of the devastated areas had to be via water — the JCG played a big role in securing access to ports by removing debris and obstacles. This effort allowed fuel tankers to gain access to deliver gasoline. The tsunami had damaged many of the sea marks too, but the JCG restored a total of 134 sea markers to secure safe navigation.

The JCG was granted 12.5 billion yen to restore the damaged vessels and aircraft, 2.2 billion yen for cost incurred in SAR missions, and 1.9 billion yen for restoring sea marks from the primary supplementary budget (total 4 trillion yen), which includes restoration costs for the Great East Japan Earthquake. The 12.5 billion awarded to restore damaged vessels and aircraft include the following repairs:

•1.8 billion yen on the Bombardier
•2.8 billion yen on the Beach
•3 billion yen on Super Puma


So, was the JCG prepared for this level of disaster?

JCG Region 2 had been warning the dangers of tsunami for quite some time through photo exhibitions and speeches. They had regularly scheduled “Disaster Preparedness Talks” in the Tohoku regions to elevate the awareness. Although they didn’t expect to experience a 9.0 magnitude and 25,000 dead and missing persons, they believe that their efforts paid off to those who reacted because of the knowledge given through the JCG’s efforts.

However, despite the fact that the JCG has been putting forth significant efforts in disaster relief, the media focus their coverage on the SDF. The reality is that the number of personnel involved is significantly lower than SDF and perhaps another reason is the missions are farther away from the coast line so it’s out of sight as well. However, the videotape of MATSUSHIMA navigating over the Tsunami waves has been a sensational footage via internet. Perhaps if this tape would have been released sooner, the JCG could have received appropriate recognition accordingly.

http://newpacificinstitute.org/jsw/?p=6604

(Photos and videos available at original article.)
 

starviking

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A crazy letter to the Editor of The Japan Times:

An idea for a containment dome
By RICHARD MESCE Arcata, California The No. 4 reactor of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant contains large quantities of radioactive material that presents a hazard due to the threat of aftershocks like the one (6.7 magnitude) recorded Thursday morning off the Tohoku-Pacific coast.
It is impossible to erect a conventional containment dome over a spent-fuel storage reactor due to the highly radioactive exposure risk to the workforce.
I have designed a special type of dome and would like to help to contribute to the cost of its construction. The containment dome is a Geodesic Coanda lift body made from light interlocking heat-shield ceramic sections.
The dome is shaped like an airfoil that produces vertical lift when air is forced to flow over its surface. A Vortex Cup attaches to helicopter skids. Air is blown from a compressed air tank through the side of the cup. The tetrahedral sectioned dome would be suspended beneath the cup.
When the compressed air swirls down and around the cup, the containment dome would begin to generate its own lift.
We could fly this light ceramic heat-shield containment dome over the hazardous reactor. The geodesic dome would have twin ducts: one to blow cold air over the fission reaction, and the other to filter the exhaust. The lift body dome and overhead vortex cup would evenly distribute the heavy load. And inertial stability would be added by inducing a slight spin.
Worst case assessments forecast a massive evacuation if a strong aftershock causes more damage.
We must act now to prevent further contamination from harming people.
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/rc20110626a4.html
 

Orionblamblam

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Here we go again...
quake.jpg
 

starviking

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We certainly felt that one - not too bad as they go. Still, I reckon we'll be be getting them for a long time to come. :-\
 

Grey Havoc

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UpForce said:
Food for thought, as we ponder - and build - the nuclear aspects of our future.

I saw that article too. Not sure about some of it's assertions and conclusions, although I agree that there should be more research in such areas as gas-cooled reactors.

In other news, Quince, after it's little mishap last month, has begun to redeem itself.
 

Grey Havoc

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Speaking of nuclear robots, looks like Honda may be getting into the picture.

(via Drudge Report.)
 

Grey Havoc

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The ongoing situation has had an unexpected effect on the issuing of GSDF and ASDF rations.
 

ninjamode

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My friend was in Japan at the time of the big earthquake, it was his second day or so and he actually beat the BBC in reporting it! (cause he saw it on Japanese tv, so he didn't really beat all media :D). I'm glad he left to travel abroad soon after, I'd be terrified to live there to be honest, I've only experienced two mild to not significant at all earthquakes and they still freaked me out.
 

starviking

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ninjamode said:
My friend was in Japan at the time of the big earthquake, it was his second day or so and he actually beat the BBC in reporting it! (cause he saw it on Japanese tv, so he didn't really beat all media :D ). I'm glad he left when he did, I'd be terrified to live there to be honest, I've only experienced two mild to not significant at all earthquakes and they still freaked me out.

A lot of my Japanese friends colleagues are freaked out by earthquakes too now - but I'm pretty used to them now myself.
 

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A table showing general JGSDF jurisdictions during it's response to the disaster (as of April 28th 2011) can be found here. (Scroll down.)
 

ninjamode

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I don't know, I guess it's different - I mean I would expect Japan to have an adapted infrastructure or like transport system and such, given the earthquakes are such often occurances there. I am afraid of earthquakes where there aren't any and the occasional one firstly freaks people out, so there's people danger, and secondly, is capable of doing quite a lot of damage (even if it's a small scale one), because none of the buildings or anything have met this type of phenomenon before.
 

starviking

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ninjamode said:
I don't know, I guess it's different - I mean I would expect Japan to have an adapted infrastructure or like transport system and such, given the earthquakes are such often occurances there. I am afraid of earthquakes where there aren't any and the occasional one firstly freaks people out, so there's people danger, and secondly, is capable of doing quite a lot of damage (even if it's a small scale one), because none of the buildings or anything have met this type of phenomenon before.

Buildings are generally built to withstand a certain amount of earthquake shaking here - though the infrastructure and transport links were hit pretty bad by the earthquake here. No major areas were cut off - but petrol was in short supply, and rail links were down as was electricity.

The earthquake did freak people out because this area never expected to see this magnitude of earthquake - but we do have regular earthquake drills anyway so we did what we're trained to do - get under the table and wait for the quake to subside - then get out of the building. The sheer size and frequency of the aftershocks were more disquieting - once we thought things had settled down we'd go back to our flat and then another shock would hit. We actually never grasped how bad things were until a few days later when the electricity was restored and we could see the devastation on TV.
 

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Hi!

http://www.rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp/dojo/GE_dose.php

At first. You should install Google earth to watch this site.
You will see 5 year predictions(5年予測) of radioactivity level without decontamination in 3 months interval at home of this site. (push top left button)
The radioactivity level were measured 1m above the ground.
Natural level in Japan:1.4mSv/year(0.16μSv/hour), Nuclear workers limit(ICRP):20mSv/year(2.28μSv/hour).
Air liner(altitude 11,000m):1.16μSv/hour(10.16mSv/year)
 

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blackkite

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TEPCO completed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station No.1 reactor building cover.
TEPCO estimate that 90% radioactivity of reactor building gas will be removed through filter.
TEPCO also plan same cover for No,3 and No.4 reactor buildings.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vcig7S-nAQA

Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station reactor pressure vessel bottom temperature at 23th of October 2011.
No,1 reactor : 72.2 degree centigrade, No.2 reactor : 79.8 degree centigrade, No.3 reactor : 71.9 degree centograde.
 

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blackkite

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Yes it is!!!!!
We are facing the possibility of another big Tsunami at the middle and the west part of Japan which facing Pacific ocean.
Possibility is over 80% in near future.
 

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here some alarming and worrying news

Japanese TV newscaster Norikazu Otsuka
in a gesture of goodwill of japanese government
he’s been promoting Fukushima food by eating them in the morning show on Fuji TV.
now has been diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia and is now hospitalized
http://www.agoracosmopolitan.com/news/intrnational/2011/11/13/1692.html

Japan is cover larger by Fallout as estimated and has more hotspots outside Fukushima prohibited area !
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15691571

a German TV channel had reporters in area
the doku "Fukushima: Leben in der Todeszohne" Fukushima: life in Death zone
is a event wat give you the goosebumps:

it seems that japanese government take no action against fallout
and put this task to local authorities, who have no idea at to do !
while people keep there children in house and go only outside if it requires
they interview a man who claimed, he is former TEMCO worker and was on site during the disaster
He says that nuclear power station No.3 it's reactor core explode during disaster

if this Doku is true, i don't know
 

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Michel Van said:
here some alarming and worrying news

Japanese TV newscaster Norikazu Otsuka
in a gesture of goodwill of japanese government
he’s been promoting Fukushima food by eating them in the morning show on Fuji TV.
now has been diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia and is now hospitalized
http://www.agoracosmopolitan.com/news/intrnational/2011/11/13/1692.html

I'd wait until something more definative comes out about this. We need to know how long the disease takes to reach this stage, and if it can be caused by radioisotopes.

Michel Van said:
Japan is cover larger by Fallout as estimated and has more hotspots outside Fukushima prohibited area !
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15691571

That's a simulation, in which the authors point out their program cannot replicate regional Japanese weather. What is needed is more sampling on the ground

Michel Van said:
it seems that japanese government take no action against fallout
and put this task to local authorities, who have no idea at to do !

if this Doku is true, i don't know

Sadly, Health and Safety is the responsibility of local authorities in Japan. It makes no sense - but that's the fact.
 

blackkite

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TEPCO released their analysis report for No1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station #1,#2 and #3 reactor.
TEPCO analyzed that all the core of #1 rector melted and depositted on the concrete located bottom of the Primary Containment Vessel(PCV) through Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV).

圧力容器(原子炉圧力容器):Reactor Pressure Vessel
格納容器:Primary Containment Vessel
給水系:Water Supply System
CS系:Core Spray System

http://www.tepco.co.jp/nu/fukushima-np/images/handouts_111130_07-j.pdf
 

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blackkite

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Michel Van said:
there no info about reactor No4 ?

Yes there are no information about #4 reactor,because #4 reactor is empty.
All fuel are in fuel storage pool for reactor maintenance.
#4 reactor building hydrogen explosion's cause was hydrogen from #3 reactor, because #3 and #4 reactor's stack is common.
 

Michel Van

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at last
now the biggest challenge begins: clean up the mess
and that can take decades until it's finish
 

blackkite

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Grey Havoc said:
Good news, although keeping it that way may be tricky.

Yes we will do everything what we can do.
 

blackkite

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Hi! Air dose rate and cesium137 level.
 

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starviking

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Cheers for that Blackkite!

So we can get that info from Yahoo Japan's homepage?
 

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Michel Van said:
at last
now the biggest challenge begins: clean up the mess
and that can take decades until it's finish

Or a few minutes.

I've often wondered: if you have some horrible melted-down reactor, what would happen if you actually *nuked* it? Put a massive thermonuclear warhead right in the midst of it. Beef up the bomb with additional depleted uranium casing and lithium deuteride... turn a 1 megaton bomb into, say, a 100-megaton bomb. Salt the LiD with other elements to make it emit a flood of neutrons, enough to cause the existing uranium/plutonium waste to undergo fission.

Obviously you'll get a mighty BANG, and you'll blast the nuclear waste sky-high. But if you don;t just blast it, but also really heavily nuke the waste, you might cause the waste to do *all* of it's radiating in short order. So you'll turn a puddle of goo from somethignt that'd be a local hazard for a hundred thousand years into something that's a big hazard for a few minutes or a few hours, and then fades away.
 

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