Man-Amplifiers and exoskeletons

Triton

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Lockheed Martin HULC (Human Universal Load Carrier) exoskeleton

Dismounted Soldiers often carry heavy combat loads that increase the stress on the body leading to potential injuries. With a HULC exoskeleton, these loads are transferred to the ground through powered titanium legs without loss of mobility.

The HULC is a completely un-tethered, hydraulic-powered anthropomorphic exoskeleton that provides users with the ability to carry loads of up to 200 lbs for extended periods of time and over all terrains. Its flexible design allows for deep squats, crawls and upper-body lifting. There is no joystick or other control mechanism. The exoskeleton senses what users want to do and where they want to go. It augments their ability, strength and endurance. An onboard micro-computer ensures the exoskeleton moves in concert with the individual. Its modularity allows for major components to be swapped out in the field. Additionally, its unique power-saving design allows the user to operate on battery power for extended missions. The HULC’s load-carrying ability works even when power is not available.

Lockheed Martin is a leading provider of advanced technology solutions for the Warfighter including ground Soldier systems such as wearable situational awareness equipment and mobility assistance systems. Future advancements in exoskeleton technologies will focus on specific user communities, shifting energy and performance requirements. Lockheed Martin is also exploring exoskeleton designs to support industrial and medical applications.

Source:
http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/hulc/index.html


Videos of Lockheed Martin HULC exoskeleton

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kat8I5UM_Vs


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWumbs9MQdM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ_qR8zCLDc


Lockheed Martin HULC product cards:

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/mfc/PC/MFC_HULC_PC.pdf

http://www.lockheedmartin.com/data/assets/mfc/PC/MFC_HULC_PC2.pdf
 

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Triton

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Triton

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Man-Amplifier from 1966

Source:
http://paleo-future.blogspot.com/2007/05/man-amplifier-1966.html
 

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Triton

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General Electric Hardiman exoskeleton from the 1960s.

Source:
http://davidszondy.com/future/robot/hardiman.htm
 

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bobbymike

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Raytheon Sarcos's Exoskeleton Nears Production The real-life Iron Man suit is lighter, stronger, and more efficient

Raytheon Sarcos's second-generation exoskeleton robotics suit, XOS 2, which was named one of Time magazine's 50 Best Inventions last year, is now a mere five years away from production, its inventors say.
The wearable robotics suit augments the operator's strength by using a system of high-pressure hydraulics, sensors, actuators, and controllers to bear the weight of an object, while leaving its wearer agile enough to kick a soccer ball. It's also lighter, stronger, and more environmentally resistant, and it uses half the power of the company's first exoskeleton, XOS 1, which rolled out in 2008. The XOS 2 has been nicknamed the Iron Man suit in homage to the high-tech power suit in the comics and movies.
Since the 2010 introduction of the XOS 2, its engineers have continued to tweak the device, further increasing its power efficiency by cutting the suit's weight and redesigning the servo valves so that more hydraulic fluid can be forced through them without undue turbulence. They aim to reduce power consumption by more than 70 percent. That in turn will lead to smaller, lighter power sources and, ultimately, an increased payload.
The XOS 2 "doesn't feel any different if it's unloaded or you put 150 pounds [68 kilograms] on the back," says XOS 2 test engineer Rex Jameson. "I don't feel the strength, but I can pick up more. The big deal is that it takes a lot less power."
Raytheon Sarcos, a robotics development group within Raytheon's Integrated Defense Systems division, designed the suit to lighten a soldier's load and help the military reduce injuries. Military support personnel can find themselves each lifting as much as 7300 kg of supplies and armaments in a day, leading to considerable orthopedic damage.
 

John21

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In some ways the future is coming quicker than I thought. We will probably end up seeing the first "portable"(under 100kg) Lethal DEW weapons by the middle to end of this decade at this rate. Here's to power armor and Space Marines and orbital dropships in the future..... ;D
 

saintkatanalegacy

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Hmmm... I wonder if they're going to use solid state lithium batteries and ultracapacitors for this one. The combination is a very promising solution.
 

bobbymike

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saintkatanalegacy said:
Hmmm... I wonder if they're going to use solid state lithium batteries and ultracapacitors for this one. The combination is a very promising solution.

I'm waiting til they strap on a 7.62mm mini-gun and call the whole rig the "Street Sweeper" ;D
 

Creative

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bobbymike said:
saintkatanalegacy said:
Hmmm... I wonder if they're going to use solid state lithium batteries and ultracapacitors for this one. The combination is a very promising solution.

I'm waiting til they strap on a 7.62mm mini-gun and call the whole rig the "Street Sweeper" ;D
This was the first thing to come to mind ;D

http://metalgear.wikia.com/wiki/File:SUDAM%C3%89RICA_MANSI%C3%93N_VISTA_1.jpg
 

sferrin

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Do we have a compact power source for these new wonders yet? And am I the only person wondering what the point of these are? As cool as they may be in science fiction it seems to me to be a good way to price yourself out of an army.
 

Dragon029

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sferrin said:
Do we have a compact power source for these new wonders yet? And am I the only person wondering what the point of these are? As cool as they may be in science fiction it seems to me to be a good way to price yourself out of an army.

I assume it's primarily so that you can get more equipment, etc to the battlefield per person, reducing the need for supplies to be sent forward (handy for when the roads and skies of an area are under enemy control). The advantage then over bringing along a cargo-carrying UGV is that you have the gear on you at all times and aren't reliant on tracking software.

Additionally, if you're ever caught in a cave with a bunch of advanced western tech, being forced to create a cruise missile, you could use it as the basis of a protective battle armour, to which flame throwers and booster rockets could be added.


Also, for the power source, there is a lot of capacitor tech being worked on, around the general area of graphene circuitry, etc, but really we don't have anything that's cheap enough or that can be produced quickly enough for this system to be fielded just yet - unless you don't mind swapping some of that equipment and stealth for a couple of gasoline power generators.
 

sferrin

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Dragon029 said:
I assume it's primarily so that you can get more equipment, etc to the battlefield per person, reducing the need for supplies to be sent forward (handy for when the roads and skies of an area are under enemy control). The advantage then over bringing along a cargo-carrying UGV is that you have the gear on you at all times and aren't reliant on tracking software.
You won't be hauling more equipment per person when you factor in the maintenance tail and all their equipment, supplies, etc. too.

Dragon029 said:
Additionally, if you're ever caught in a cave with a bunch of advanced western tech, being forced to create a cruise missile, you could use it as the basis of a protective battle armour, to which flame throwers and booster rockets could be added.
I hope you don't actually believe Iron Man is real.[/quote][/quote]
 

Dragon029

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sferrin said:
Dragon029 said:
I assume it's primarily so that you can get more equipment, etc to the battlefield per person, reducing the need for supplies to be sent forward (handy for when the roads and skies of an area are under enemy control). The advantage then over bringing along a cargo-carrying UGV is that you have the gear on you at all times and aren't reliant on tracking software.
You won't be hauling more equipment per person when you factor in the maintenance tail and all their equipment, supplies, etc. too.

Dragon029 said:
Additionally, if you're ever caught in a cave with a bunch of advanced western tech, being forced to create a cruise missile, you could use it as the basis of a protective battle armour, to which flame throwers and booster rockets could be added.
I hope you don't actually believe Iron Man is real.

If you were using the tech to set up forward operating bases, they'd be helpful regardless.

If, like I was trying to put across, you were sending a team on a strike mission behind enemy lines (excuse the cliche'), they would be helpful as it reduces the distance the insertion vehicle has to travel into dangerous territory and also allows said troops to take along additional demolitions, comms, survival equipment, etc.

For example, tactical air control parties who need to direct air efforts in hot airspace can be dropped in from afar, then using this equipment, take longer range radio / satellite equipment, as well as target designators, etc, along with additional combat gear which might previously have been delegated to additional men or simply not taken with them.

While this is quoted from a recent B-rate movie; 'Victory loves Preparation.'

Also, Iron Man is totally real, I know a guy that ran the beach event a few years back. ;) [/quote][/quote]
 

bobbymike

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sferrin said:
Dragon029 said:
I assume it's primarily so that you can get more equipment, etc to the battlefield per person, reducing the need for supplies to be sent forward (handy for when the roads and skies of an area are under enemy control). The advantage then over bringing along a cargo-carrying UGV is that you have the gear on you at all times and aren't reliant on tracking software.
You won't be hauling more equipment per person when you factor in the maintenance tail and all their equipment, supplies, etc. too.

Dragon029 said:
Additionally, if you're ever caught in a cave with a bunch of advanced western tech, being forced to create a cruise missile, you could use it as the basis of a protective battle armour, to which flame throwers and booster rockets could be added.
I hope you don't actually believe Iron Man is real.
[/quote]
[/quote]

I'm a little more optimistic. I think advances is material science with bring us compact enough energy sources that untethered suits will be a reality (timeframe ??) It would make the heavy weapon squad interesting if they could carry mini guns and maybe some of the small guided munitions currently being developed all aimed by a cross hair on an eye reticle that has thermal and maybe even x ray vision.
 

saintkatanalegacy

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well, there's this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_double-layer_capacitor


they're actually getting cheaper. Those in conjunction with a battery focused more on storage will be very viable.


come to think of it, if regenerative braking in cars generates electricity from the resistance, maybe... just maybe heavy loads or cushioning might actually be used to regenerate power if done right; that is by resisting the load from gravity and inertia. hmmm...
 

Grey Havoc

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Polymer based batteries are also likely to play a part.
 

Grey Havoc

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http://www.military.com/video/forces/special-operations-forces/tactical-assault-light-operator-suit/2732874942001/

EDIT: Woops, already beaten to it.
 

piginapoke

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What happens if it fails when youre fully laden? How is the user protected?
 

Dragon029

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It'd depend on the extent of the exoskeleton; any component connected to the assistive limbs should be protected from hyper-extension, but when it comes to crush forces (eg, arms being pinned between ground and body when falling forward), then the only real viable protection would be in having rigid protective rings / bands that cover part of the limb. That however goes against the plan to have liquid armour, which, while it can go solid and protect in such a scenario, is still power-dependent.
 

Grey Havoc

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From Soviet journal (I think, between 1960 and 1990) - "magical skin", with self healing and moisture drainage:
View attachment 628494
(nanosuit from "Crysis"?)
...
In first half of 60th, in NII-100, worked at 500-kg armoured exoskeleton, with small ICE, machine gun and AT weapons in hands.
A few years ago, in Russian Federation, also, started works at military exoskeleton with ICE.
...
Russian passive infantry exoskeleton (late 1990th or early 2000th), named BSIKPE (Translated, Armoured-power indiviadual complect - passive exoskeleton):
View attachment 628497
View attachment 628498
Full weight 53.4 kg, weight of exoskeleton 17 kg. Use old Russian rating of armour, canceled in 2014. Helmet and details of body armour, 5 rate, or, 7.62x54R with LPS bullet (steel core, not AP), from Dragunov SVD, on 5-10 m. Other details of body armour - 6a rate, or, 7.62x54R with B-32 AP bullet (special core). Other elements - 3 rate, or, 5.45x39/7.62x39 with PS bullets (steel core, not AP), from Kalashnikov AK-74/AKM, on 5-10 m. Protection area - to 180 square decimetres, or 19.375 square foots.
...
Other passive exoskeleton, later than BSIKPE:
View attachment 628496
Adjustible sizes, use under armour, equipment and warm clothing.
View attachment 628495
You can see, variants of use. I think, the most interesting - with "Scorpion" system:
View attachment 628500
Data of "Scorpion":
 

jsport

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From Soviet journal (I think, between 1960 and 1990) - "magical skin", with self healing and moisture drainage:
View attachment 628494
(nanosuit from "Crysis"?)
...
In first half of 60th, in NII-100, worked at 500-kg armoured exoskeleton, with small ICE, machine gun and AT weapons in hands.
A few years ago, in Russian Federation, also, started works at military exoskeleton with ICE.
...
Russian passive infantry exoskeleton (late 1990th or early 2000th), named BSIKPE (Translated, Armoured-power indiviadual complect - passive exoskeleton):
View attachment 628497
View attachment 628498
Full weight 53.4 kg, weight of exoskeleton 17 kg. Use old Russian rating of armour, canceled in 2014. Helmet and details of body armour, 5 rate, or, 7.62x54R with LPS bullet (steel core, not AP), from Dragunov SVD, on 5-10 m. Other details of body armour - 6a rate, or, 7.62x54R with B-32 AP bullet (special core). Other elements - 3 rate, or, 5.45x39/7.62x39 with PS bullets (steel core, not AP), from Kalashnikov AK-74/AKM, on 5-10 m. Protection area - to 180 square decimetres, or 19.375 square foots.
...
Other passive exoskeleton, later than BSIKPE:
View attachment 628496
Adjustible sizes, use under armour, equipment and warm clothing.
View attachment 628495
You can see, variants of use. I think, the most interesting - with "Scorpion" system:
View attachment 628500
Data of "Scorpion":
all that extra plastic on the belt may add to relaible feed but it is alot of weight, cost and volumn.
 

jsport

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TSNIITOCHMASH showed the passiv (1,2) and active (3,4) #exoskeleton at Army-2020 forum.
 

GARGEAN

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1,2 looks like active too. Passive ones usually look different and ones currenty in use in RuArmy are quite distinct
 

shin_getter

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Some videos of those design:

Supposely from CASIC Second Research Institute 206 lab
Passive exo for transferring load to land (80% when static), weight is 4kg. Supposely 5~10% of work can be save while moving.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bai4D-GgLQ


20kg weight support for straightening back, for moving ammo
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=STrH0dT3UZI


View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TfNdSa_B34


----
So, in the grim darkness of 21 century war, there is only exoskeleton dudes with halberds in no atmospheric pressure environments~
 

DWG

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My FB memories just pointed out that this kind of new technology will bring new hazards to the battlefield - an ant finding its way between the exoskeleton and your skin!

(I was wearing a walker boot, seven damned straps to undo before I could get to the thing - imagine if it was a fire ant!).
 

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